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Well I've pretty well eaten up my E3 front tire. I ordered a Harbor Frieght motorcycle tire bead buster.($20.00) Now I was wondering what irons to buy. I don't want junk that will break or bend when I'm giving it all it's worth removing a tire.

What kind of tire irons do you guys recommend? Thanks, jimsjinx
 

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I use the 24"ones from Harbor freight. I got three of them and they work nicely....



You should also have some rim protectors. I got 3 sets off Ebay kind of cheep.
 

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Thanks Bama! Say, where is that shot taken of the wall in your avitar, if I may ask? We are sorta nieghbors ya know! jimsjinx
 

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jimsjinx wrote:
Thanks Bama! Say, where is that shot taken of the wall in your avitar, if I may ask? We are sorta nieghbors ya know! jimsjinx
That is from our trip last month to Green Mountain Falls, CO. It is at the "Garden of the Gods".
 

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Appropriatly named! It is beautiful! Reminds me of the painted desert in Az.. jimsjinx
 

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I do my own tires also.

At first I was using the HF 2' irons. They worked. I found them a bit bulky to handle, thick so harder to get into a tight spot. I broke the end off one.
HF did replace the broke one free when I was up there last week.

I bought a set of spoons from the local bike shop. Cost about $15 each but I like those so much better now that I got to use them a couple times.
Thinner so easier to get into tight spots. Smooth chromed so they slide easier if you want to slide a bit. Being smooth and rounded they are less likely to chew up the rim or dig into it. Being smaller size I find they are easier to handle and don't get in their own way as much as the bulky bars. Being steel the spoons should not break, and really should not need to force anything that would bend them either, they are strong.

If done right I think most times you should not have to fight the tire very much or use too much force. Small spoons work well for me, I don't need lot's of leverage.

Watch some of the U-tube videos for changing tires, I did fine with my first couple tires but it's much easier after I found some tips in some videos.

Soap up the tire bead good and the first side of the tire you can just press on by hand, start on side towards you then push push it down as you go around the rim.
First couple tires I mounted I did not do that, soaped up bead then fought with bars to mount the first side LOL
Much easier to just PUSH it on LOL

I like spoons best now for most of the work, it's still handy to have the $5 bars around also. 2 Spoons and 1 bar should work well.
 

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i do all my own tires i use the 24inch bars, soapy water and a can of ether
 

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peterbilt wrote:
i do all my own tires i use the 24inch bars, soapy water and a can of ether
The either trick works well LOL
I used to do that when doing Semi-Truck tires and such as a tire man once at a truck stop.

So far I have not needed to do that to the bike tires, mine just air up nice and pop pop right onto the beads like they should.

Edit to mention

First time a person does tires they may have a bit of trouble airing up and seating the beads.
Can't push enough air fast enough though a valve stem with the core in, and take out the core and an air chuck does not work since nothing to press the center valve in.

Simple fix, buy a cheap air chuck, unscrew the cap and take out the valve! Now when seating beads I use that chuck, I crimp the airhose and put the chuck into the coupler and onto the tire then let go the hose. When both beads POP I crimp the hose and remove the chuck. This lets the air flow free with out the valve stem core or chuck valve in the way.

The first tire I did I could not air up to seat the bead and took it to tire shop and let them air it to seat it. Then I took out the valve on a cheap chuck and never had a problem seating mine since.
.
 

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Saw some where where a guy used a cargo strap to assist in seating the bead. I think it was just for emergencies but lots of negative feedback on that as a I recall.
 

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The cargo strap may work also.
If you can wrap something around the tire in center of tread and tighten it, when it squeezes in on the center of the tire it should push the beads outwards. Might be a good trick for on the road if a tire bead is off, like patch a tire or replacing bad valve stem etc..
In a case like that you would not have a large fast supply of air, so maybe the strap would get the bead close enough to hold air from those slow little 12V compressors until enough air built up to POP the beads.

For around home/shop with a real compressor air chuck with core removed works well and probably the easiest way.
 

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Thanks brother Chromo! Yeah, I've seen the either and propane technoque before. Just something about compressed explosive gasses and fire concerns me!!LOL Fireman for ever I suppose! I get nervous when I see guys puor gasoline in carbs, BBQ's, and for lighting other utility fires. I figured I'd just hold up a large photo of my EX, and SCARE the tire back on the bead!! LOL jimsjinx
 

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Hmmm... well, I do the gas in the carbs pretty often.
I do try to be prepared just in case. Main thing is don't spill it all over the carb and engine and don't be looking down into carb when engine cranks LOL
A nice pop backfire through carb can light up your world LOL

Not too bad normally if 2 rules above are followed, don't spill gas everywhere and don't have your face over the carb!

What scares me more than gas is smoke that smells like burnt rubber!
Tried to start my Porsche that been sitting for months in shop. Ran fine when parked. I got a BUNCH of smoke out from under dash and it smelled like rubber!
So much for driving it anytime soon I guess.
Probably a mouse or something chewed some wires?
 

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I saw it being done on a Toyota Landcruiser in Greenland or Antartica somewhere. They used lighter fluid. Big "POP" and the tire was seated.



Mind you, the only combustible stuff around was a tire and the fluid. And the wheel jumped about a foot in the air. Best not to do it in the workshop !!!



Dave.
 

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Just an add on question here,when you remount the tire is there any lub/sealent you should use to seal the bead ? My apologize for hopping on you post Jim.

Jim
 

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rideandslidejim wrote:
Just an add on question here,when you remount the tire is there any lub/sealent you should use to seal the bead ? My apologize for hopping on you post Jim.

Jim
You do not need to put any type of sealant on the bead. Youuse lube to get the tire and bead on the rim (soap water, KY, ect).
 

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"Youuse lube to get the tire and bead on the rim (soap water, KY, ect)."

Soap and similar products may cause pitting on the aluminum wheel.
Grease, if too much is used may make your DynaBeads stick together, then they won't work.
I always recommend ArmourAll or similar product.
KY Jelly in your toolbox may get you some funny looks,but does work well. Won't damage rubber like petroleum based lubes do. :)
 
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