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It seems to me that we need some kind of write up on timing belt changing or at least some permanent warning on the subject. There have been at least three folks on the forum who've damaged their bikes with the belt change, and probably scared off several others who would have done thier own but took it to a shop. The job isn't complicated or difficult but the price of error is high. What do you think, should some one write up the process and submit it to Wingnut for possible inclusion into the Goldwing Tips page or some such so that we could just refer anyone to that instead of recommending a search on the subject or have to re-type the whole process each time?
 

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Sounds like a good idea to me. I think that my 86 Aspy with 90,000+ miles is due.

I amsomewhat mechanically inclined and have done some minor repairs to this point but after reading some of the posts I had felt that maybe I would be better off to take it to the shop.

If there was a post with detailed instructions I might attempt it over the winter.
 

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I think that's a great idea. One of the first questions new old wingers have is about their timing belts. A tutorial would be most helpful. It could include a few members tips and some reassurance to not freak out when that right hand pulley moves after the old belt is removed. I think that scares alot of people away from attempting the job themselves. Their afraid that they won't line up the pulley correctly. My own tip is to mark the pulley to the engine case with an indelible magic marker before disassembly. That way you can be sure your not a tooth off. I'm sure other members have other tips that they'd be willing to share. The trick to putting it on the Tips section would be to keep it clear and concise.
 

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Good idea! It would definitely add to the comfort level of the first timer.

I changed mine a couple of months ago (worried the whole time). I printed out all of the relevent info that I found on this site before starting, and still came back and asked questions before firing back up.
 

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I too, would fall in that camp. I consider myself fairly mechanically inclined, but after reading some of the horror stories, am planning on taking my 86 in to a shop for the belts, this winter.
 

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It's really not that difficult guys. Don't be in a hurry, have the right tools and a good working environment with good light.
All the marks are clearly visible on the cam, crank and flywheel. Once you remove the old belts you install the new ones in reverse order. Just make sure you put the inside (closest to engine) on first. It’s sort of like rebuilding the carbs, the first time you wrestle them out, mess with them and wrestle them back in. By the third time you don’t even think about it.
 

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gkiesel wrote:
I think that's a great idea. One of the first questions new old wingers have is about their timing belts. A tutorial would be most helpful. It could include a few members tips and some reassurance to not freak out when that right hand pulley moves after the old belt is removed. I think that scares alot of people away from attempting the job themselves. Their afraid that they won't line up the pulley correctly. My own tip is to mark the pulley to the engine case with an indelible magic marker before disassembly. That way you can be sure your not a tooth off. I'm sure other members have other tips that they'd be willing to share. The trick to putting it on the Tips section would be to keep it clear and concise.
I know that when that right hand gear jumped it got my attention. Being somewhat mechanically inclined, I was able to overcome the problem but to those who don't really know the mechanics of an internal combustion engine, it could scare you.

I did get a whole lot of information while scanning the forum, though. Great information on here.
 

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Here is a start at listing the points of importance. When this is complete, then all someone needs to do is write it up in a user friendly format: Feel free to add or omit things that you deem necessary:

Belt change--at each?????? distance ???????? time interval. If you are unsure of the last belt change, do it.

Orientation---while sitting on the bike, left is port side, right is starboard side. That never changes, no matter from where you view the engine.

The timing cover is at rear center top of the engine and looks like a big silvercoin with a slot in it.

Easier done if the coolent is drained and the rad removed or moved foward at the bottom.

Remove both belt covers--good time to polish them if they need it.

Remove the spark plugs

Rotate the engine CCW(moving the top of the crankshaft bolttoward the port side) until the T-1 mark in the viewing hole is aligned with the reference mark, and the two cam pulleys are aligned with their marks on the outboard of thehousing, and the "UP" marks on the pulleys is pointing up. If it all aligns, then the old belts were installed correctly.

Do not move the crank or cam pulleys again until you are completed.

Loosen the tensioner bolts and remove both tensioners and springs.

Spin the tensioner pulleys and listen for any noise and feel for any roughness. Noise or roughness means a bad pulley-replace it.

The stbd. cam willwant to rotate about 20 degrees when you remove that belt. Expect it but do not worry aboutit now.

Remove both belts

I gotta go for awhile so am going to post this uncompleted--I will edit complete it or if anyone else wants to chime in--feel free as we should include all ideas and tips in the final version.I would volunteer to write it up if we get a reasonable concensus as to its content, and it is agreeable with Exavid, and ultimately,the Wingnut.
 

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One thing I'd be sure to include are pictures of the timing marks on the cam gears. On my 83 1100 there are 2 other marks on the right cam gear which could be easily confused with the correct marks.
On this replacement 81 1100 the marks look all together different than the 83.
For this reason I'd say the most important step without fail would be to mark the gears and case with a sharpie before removing them like mentioned after the crank is at TDC 1.

My next tip would be to replace radiator hoses if age isnt known.
I like to remove the lower front water pump housing instead of trying to muscle the hose off of it and taking a chance damaging the fragile radiator fitting.

Heck, while at it might as well pull the radiator all together, makes the belt job easier, hose replacement easier and the thermostat will never be any more accessible so replace that too.
 

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Exavid:

From the what its worth department, I have some photos that I took when I did my bike, I could add it to the information available. I would be very interested in what you all have to say on this subject.

I did mine back in august and the bike runs fine. However;knowing what to do as time (and miles) march on would be nice.



Mark
 

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Hi Teacher--Since this is Exavids idea and thread, I was only putting foward a possible method of gathering most of the good ideas for the job into one thread.I was now kinda waiting to hear again from Paul andhow he feels about this method. Just because I volunteered does not mean that I am best suited to do it. He, himself is an excellent writer.
 

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I think Hawker's approach is the way to go, maybe it could be filled out a little bit more in detail. If Whiskerfish's contact, Octane would allow his write up to be either posted here or permanently linked that would be even better since he's got pictures.
 

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For the 1500," Rudy" has a link in his signature line that take you to his web page and among other information is a tutorial on changing belts, with pictures and everything. I found it very helpfuland stress relieving as I had never done them on a 1500 before.
 

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One question! I was interested to see Octanes approach to keeping the right side pulley from moving when the tensioner bolt is removed! (Using an offset wrench over the pulley bolt then wire-tied to the frame) He mentions applying the new belt loosely over the pulley BEFORE the wrench trick. I'm assuming this is because the wrench blocks the new belt from going on. If this is so, how do you remove the old belt without taking the wrench off? Also, how can tension adjustments be done with the wrench on there. I must be missing something here, The instructions say the crank must be rotated 360 degrees to do the respective belt tensioner adjustments. Prior to this tensioning, how do you keep the right side pulley from slipping. Sorry if this is a stupid Q, it's just not all straight in my mind yet...Thanks!
 

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Wow! That tutorial has great pictures.

Is the removal of the radiador necessary, or to illustrate?

I have done two belt jobs, with the same problem. The right side pulley moves two teeth and you must twist it with your hand. Agh!
 
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