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I have an 86 goldwing aspy. I need new tires and am considering changing them myself. This would be my 1st time. Any advice about taking the rear wheel off, getting the old tires off, putting the new ones on and balancing would be appreciatted.
 

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I put a new reartire on my 1500 but I chickened out and had a shop mount the front tire. The job is easier if you have a bike jack but it can be done on the center stand. I think pulling the rear wheel on the 1200 is pretty much the same as the 1500. On the 1500 you need to take the saddlebags off, remove the bolt holding the muffler, loosen the muffler clamp, twist and rotate the muffler enough to clear the axle. Take the caliper off and hang it with some wire to the frame. Put a piece of wood between the pads so the pistons don't come out and to make it easier to put it back on. Remove the axle and caliper bracket, You may have to remove both lower shock bolts.Pull the wheel out of the final drive. You may have to take the back part of the rear fender off and/or let the air out of the tire to get it out from under the bike. I used a bench vise and some pieces of wood padding to break the bead on the old tire but you can do it with a couple tire irons and a rubber mallet. Get a rim protector or use some scrap between the irons and the rim to avoid scratching. Good idea to replace the valve stem too. Be careful of the brake disk, I removed mine so I wouldn't warp or bend it while wrestling with it. Most new tires have a mark to show the lightest part of the tire that goes next to the valve stem. Also make sure you have the arrow on the sidewall pointing in the direction of rotation. I balanced my wheel and tire, do a search and there's a post on the subject. It's not hard, the front tire defeated me, the Dunlop EIII has very stiff sidewalls and I was afraid I'd damage my rim so I had it done. I took both brake disks off first because all it takes is for a propped up wheel to fall over and you could have a bent disk.
 

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HI ,

I changed both tires on my 1200, it took me two days. Get the longest tire irons you can find, mine wre about 9" long. I broke the beads by using the front bumper of my Jeep, some 2x4's and a hydraulic jack. Most of my time was fighting the tires.

Next time I'll take the wheels off, bring them to the dealer and have new tires mounted.

TOJ
 

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Hi Bwssr,

By all means take the wheel off, but would strongly suggest you let a tire dealer fit the new rubber and sort the balancing. it saves all the bad language and scrapped knuckles

Nick

welsh winger
 

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Absolutely.........take the tires off and take them somewhere to have them changed and balanced. I used to do the tires on my Yammys, but for the 82 wing I can get the tire off by taking off the saddlebag crash bar and that's it. I don't have to remove any exhaust brackets or the saddlebags (but I usually do remove the saddlebags, total of 4 bolts and I have to remove 2 bolts anyway to remove the crash bar)

Once I showed up at his shop with the 82 with a tire on the passenger seat......he told me to go home and just bring him the tire, and to quit wasting his time.

I'm still intimidated by the removal of the saddle bags, passenger floor board cable, light bar, crash knuckles etc. to get at the tire on my 96, but my wrench with his lift can remove the tire without all that extra work. It is a bonus though that he's a buddy and is definitely cheaper than my frustration. As opposed to the 82....he tells me to bring in the 96.

Kyle
 

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It's not as bad as you think. Aggravating, yes. I have the new tires ordered and the shop is ready for the rims when they arrive. This'll be the second time for me. The manual does a fair job of explaining it. The nice thing is that you can do it by blocking up the center stand to get about 2" clearance under the tire. The back of the rear fender comes off and you can just roll it on out of there. One key point is to let the air out of the tire. You need that tiny extra bit of clearance. Oh yeah, a shovel helps to raise the tire into place when reinstalling. Use it like a crowbar to lift it. Low tech but very effective. My 2 cents. :goofygrin:
 

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hi changing tyres was the first job when i got my 84 1200 asp removed the wheels from the bike myself then took them to get new tyres fitted(no extra charge)and ballanced only charged £3.00 extra for the ballancing, must say could have done with raising the bike up a bit on the centre stand to help reconet the shocks but managed ok in the end. only takes them about 15-20mins to fit and ballance and saves a lot of hassel to yourself,

enjoy your ride Pete
 

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I have removed the rear wheel from my 86 Aspencade twice now. The first time I decided to remove the exhausts inorder to extract the axle. This proved to be a complete pain. The second time, I decided to remove the shocks instead. Removal was easy as was everything else right up untill attempting to put the right shocks' bottom bolt back in. 3 hours of cursing and praying that I didn't strip the threads.

Next time , it's back to removing the exhaust pipes.





cheers, Craig
 
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