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I'm trying to clean the old gasket material off the mating surfaces and I'm using a picture
on Randakk's site as my model. I've used spray-on gasket remover followed by a
plastic putty knife and synthetic scouring pads. Doesn't come anywhere close. Any
suggestions on getting the mating surfaces flat and clean?
 

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If it were mine, I'd use a single edged razorblade to remove the old gasket. Of course it goes without saying to take your time and hold the blade at a shallow angle to prevent gouging the heads surface....







But I just said that... Didn't I.....:shock:
 

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roscoepc wrote:
If it were mine, I'd use a single edged razorblade to remove the old gasket. Of course it goes without saying to take your time and hold the blade at a shallow angle to prevent gouging the heads surface....

 

 

 

But I just said that... Didn't I.....:shock:
+2
 

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gido wrote:
I'm trying to clean the old gasket material off the mating surfaces and I'm using a picture
on Randakk's site as my model. I've used spray-on gasket remover followed by a
plastic putty knife and synthetic scouring pads. Doesn't come anywhere close. Any
suggestions on getting the mating surfaces flat and clean?
I would never use a scouring pad.:lash:

As roscoepc said carefully scrape the surfaces. I then use a ten inch millbastard file and draw file the surfaces for a final cleaning. They don't have to look like new, just clean and smooth.
 

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They're plastic scouring pads. The green ones.

I'll check my toolbox for the file.
 

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The main reason against using any kind of scouring pad is that you might inadvertantly scrub too much in one spot causing a gasket leak when you reinstall the head....
 

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Ken Bergen wrote:
gido wrote:
I'm trying to clean the old gasket material off the mating surfaces and I'm using a picture
on Randakk's site as my model. I've used spray-on gasket remover followed by a
plastic putty knife and synthetic scouring pads. Doesn't come anywhere close. Any
suggestions on getting the mating surfaces flat and clean?
I would never use a scouring pad.:lash:

As roscoepc said carefully scrape the surfaces. I then use a ten inch millbastard file and draw file the surfaces for a final cleaning. They don't have to look like new, just clean and smooth.
Your saying that you mite damage the heads with a scouring pad but it's alright to use a file?

Best practice is to take the heads to a good machine shop and have them surfaced. It mite cost you $50 but it's money well spent.

Steve
 

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SuperSkypilot wrote:
Your saying that you mite damage the heads with a scouring pad but it's alright to use a file?
Yes he is and I agree...With the scouring pad you're gonna have a temancy to scrub one spot while, with the file laid flat across the head, you're concentrating on the "dirty area's" while having an even stroke across the head.... Lightly of course and, with a deft touch, all that you'll remove is the gasket and no aluminum.....:cool:
 

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I used a stanley blade carefully then a plastic scourer. Used to use the scourer on weapons just have to remember that aluminium is a lot softer than gun metal. So carefully does it
 

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I used a synthetic scouring pad for mine two years ago and it worked just fine. You guys seem to assume that using a scouring pad means pouring the elbow grease to it. Not correct. You can lightly scrub those mating surfaces to remove the old gasket leftovers.

I used some stuff called "Goo Gone" ( I think that's the name ). Let it sit for a while to loosen and soften the old gasket material and then used a 3M synthetic pad to remove the loosened and softened material. All came off, mating surfaces were good, and I've had no issues in over 2 years.

Put a file on a head? Never in a million years. I'd come closer to spending the $50 to have them resurfaced.
 

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I did my two with spray on gasket remover and a shaped stick I found in the garden that was about the thickness of a pencil.



The same stick did both sides and no gouging what so ever.



Wood cannot score metal even alli.;)
 

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If I ever have to do mine I'm gonna use the drill with a wire brush on the end.That's what I do on everything to get the stuck gaskets off!:lash:

Bobby
 

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Oh Boy! Oh Boy!

Initially, I use paint/gasket remover to soften as much gasket as I can. Then I use the razor blade as described by Ros. Then I use my SANDING BLOCK with fine grit wetpaper. The sanding block prevents spending too much time in one spot. Once through the fiber portion of the gasket, you'll see the bright shiney metal known as aluminum head.

The trick is to clean the surface evenly. And I mean CLEAN.



Once clean, apply a thin coat of blueing, and place the head on a surface plate.

Yes you do! Just about any mirror your wife won't miss will do. After identifying the high spots, you can use the mirror with lapping compound. PLEASE, use a little common sense and finesse, or youWILL be heading to the machine shop for a resurface.



I've never had a head that needed surfacing, although I'm sure there are a lot that do. Blueing the head will give you an indication of how much work needs to be done.

Honda shows using a straight edge and measuring for warpage. Our heads areshort on the four cylinders.It would have to be warped pretty good, to be bad.
 

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I'd love to point out that very few files sold today are actually straight.



That being said, I worked rebuilding engines and transmissions for a number of years and yes, we used a big file (I preferred a lathe file because of the angle of the teeth) to do the final clean-up of many gasket surfaces. There is , however a great deal of technique to draw filing without damaging or crowning the surface, especially on soft metals like aluminum which is so prone to loading a file and galling the surface.



Yes it's a good technique.

No, I would not recommend it to anyone who's skill level I wasn't sure of. It would be very easy to crown a short surface like a two cylinder head.



Asheet of wet-or-dry paper glued lightly to a good mirror is a great wayto assure flatness. Just be sure to hold the layout blued head in such a way that it isn't inclined to rock and cause a convex surface.



Now with all that being said I agree with Superskypilot that the best way is to have a good machine shop take the absolute minimum necessary to assure a flat, true surface. It is so much work to do the heads that it would be a real pain to have to do it again before another twenty years just because of a small machine shop bill. The heads came out of the factory dead flat and the OEM gaskets on many of the four cylinder motors have failed. I think they need all the help they can get.
 

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roscoepc wrote:
SuperSkypilot wrote:
Your saying that you mite damage the heads with a scouring pad but it's alright to use a file?
Yes he is and I agree...With the scouring pad you're gonna have a temancy to scrub one spot while, with the file laid flat across the head, you're concentrating on the "dirty area's" while having an even stroke across the head.... Lightly of course and, with a deft touch, all that you'll remove is the gasket and no aluminum.....:cool:
actually if scrub until you remove the old gasket and stop you will be at the original head surface. No matter how much you scrub or for how long, if you stop when all of the gasket is gone you will be at the original head surface. The factory spec is flat to within .004", just try to "scrub" .004 off of a piece of aluminum with a scrubie and see how long it takes.

I have a mill so for me it's not a big problem but the automotive standard is to use a 3M surface prepdisk on a 1/4" die grinder .

Steve
 

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its a cylinder head not a nasa piece of equipent them heads are tuff just use one of them friciton discs meant for aluminum and put it on a drill, or die grinder and clean it off
 

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I have to agree with Peterbuilt on this one!If you want to mess it up then go ahead and use a sharp scraper blade.:bow:

Bobby
 

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SuperSkypilot wrote:
I have a mill so for me it's not a big problem but the automotive standard is to use a 3M surface prepdisk on a 1/4" die grinder .

Steve
+1

Like my mentor taught me years ago with his words, "Just don't hang around too long". Meaning one area.:thumbsup:

JD
 

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What a bunch of fradey cats! Just get after the big stuff with a hammer and cold chisel, then go after what's left with an 8 inch grindingwheel ona high speeddrill.

That old gasket will be on the walls and ceiling, but it won't be on the motorany more.:littleangel:
 

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Feetup wrote:
Now with all that being said I agree with Superskypilot that the best way is to have a good machine shop take the absolute minimum necessary to assure a flat, true surface.
I don't disagree with that. Theproblem is finding a "good" machine shop. The bigger problem is you don't know they're a bad machine shop until AFTER they screwed up. I don't want to sound like a pecimist, but a good machinist is rare. As are good GW techs.
 
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