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So, as I was riding home from work last night, I noiticed that I really couldn't see through the windscreen because of glare from oncoming traffic. I tried some specially formulated cleaner for car windsheilds (glas) but it didn't fill in the scratches (haze). So, what do you all suggest? Have any of you used Meguiars "mirror glaze"?
 

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[align=left]Windshield Scratch Removal. We all seem to have this problem at some stage. There are kits available to remove the not too deep culprits, but they take forever to work. An easier way to get the same result is to use car rubbing compound and a polishing machine. Remember to use plenty of water as well, to prevent burning the plastic. Now I know that everyone doesn't have access to a polisher, but don't despair, because you can use a mutton cloth to the same effect, It will take longer but will still be very much faster than using a kit. [/align]
[align=left]This is copied from the goldwing tips page of this site ...cheers Ciaran:waving::waving:[/align]
 

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Meguiars will work fine, I've used it for years on aircraft plexiglass. Take the windsheild off and lay it on a towel on a flat surface and buff away. I've done it by hand, with a 3/8" drill and a buffing pad and with an electric buffer. Meguiras makes a polishing solution for scratch removal which works faster, but the regular stuff will do the job. I won't work on polycarbonate (Lexan) but then nothing does well on that stuff since it's surfact is too soft.
 

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I did this with compound and an electricbuffer on my windshield. It had lots of very fine scratches I think from using the wrong type of cloths to clean it. I brought the bike to a friend of mine who works in an auto shop and he did the job with the shield still on the bike. Worked perfect, but I had to wash all the compound bits off the Wing afterwards and that took ages because the heat of the sun made it stick to everything! Took me 2 hours to get it all off. Next time I'll take the shield off to get it done.
 

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If your windshield is a Honda one, don't buff for too long or you will remove the outer coating/skin from it and you will see a "map" as you look at it. If light buffing doesn't remve enough of the scratches or the scratches are too deep, just bin it and buy another as you will otherwise have to buff through the skin to get the deep marks out. It's worth a try in any case.
 

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Meguiar's Mirror Glaze plastic polish... I used to use it on F-16 canopies to clear things up... worked well. Still use it on my helmet visor and windshield.

They also make stuff for clear plastic that has more damage than just haze.
 

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:clapper:

If you have got 21 years use out of the windshield, I guess I would just buy a new windshield. I replced mine with a Slipstreamer lightly tinted for $79.00. Looks great and not to expensive. :gunhead:
 

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jeepster09 wrote:
:clapper:

If you have got 21 years use out of the windshield, I guess I would just buy a new windshield. I replced mine with a Slipstreamer lightly tinted for $79.00. Looks great and not to expensive. :gunhead:
At $79 for a new screen, it hardly seems worth all that bother and elbow grease trying to save the old one. :?
 

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03Silver wrote:
At $79 for a new screen, it hardly seems worth all that bother and elbow grease trying to save the old one. :?
It does to me! $79 bucks ain't chicken feed at my place! If there is no sign of cracking, buff it out. You will be surprised how well it will come out. You can do it on the bike but cover things with a drop cloth or newspaper so you won't have to do what GWEddie had to. The worst side will be the front of course, but taking it off the bike and doing the inside will be well worth the effort. It really doesn't take all that long and it's not too much work with a drill and buffing pad. Just keep the drill rpms down a bit if it's a 1/4" drill because too high a speed heats things up.

:grinner:
 

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Well, if I loose the ebay auction, I'll give it a whirl. Heck, even if I win the auction, I'll still try it. Have one in reserve! I always try and have a spare of any part that wears out, or is a pain when it's broken. That way, the next riding day comes nice and fast.
 

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Using the Mirror Glaze stuff isn't any harder than cleaning the windscreen.
 

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It's amazing what determination can do. I had a side window break in -45F weather on an old Piper Pacer I owned. In the village of Kotzebue were I lived there wasn't any source of plexiglass but I found an old pinball machine that had a plexiglass back board, the part where all the scores and graphics are. After sanding off the paint with asanding disk on my drill using 400 wet paper (the finest I could find) and then working with a buffingpad and a bottle of Meguiar's I managed to get the piece cleaned up and looking almost like new. Just had to cut it and install it. The thing was still in the airplane years later.
 

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Hi Folks

finest grade farecla
http://www.farecla.com/automotive.asp?id=66&stage=Automotive&set=1
a rubbing compound , or a product called T-cut work really well.

3m have a range of products particularly fine compound heads,
http://cms.3m.com/cms/GB/en/2-29/rzcFEU/view.jhtml

you can pick these up at most motor factors [Partco]in the UK , some ofthese are designed to be used without water. i have had great results on most surfaces when trying to take out scratches on most materials, if you dont have a polisher, dont be tempted to use a drill or other device that simply spins as the surface will get burnt too easily.
I recommend using a fine compound head and a fine grade rubbing compund by hand, it will take longer but will have the desired results. Bonus of course is with a little care you can also use these products on your tired , sunburnt , scratched paintwork and give it a new lease of life. [Not that I have ever seen a GOLDWING in this state of course....:D]

BB
 

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exavid wrote:
It's amazing what determination can do. I had a side window break in -45F weather on an old Piper Pacer I owned. In the village of Kotzebue were I lived there wasn't any source of plexiglass but I found an old pinball machine that had a plexiglass back board, the part where all the scores and graphics are. After sanding off the paint with asanding disk on my drill using 400 wet paper (the finest I could find) and then working with a buffingpad and a bottle of Meguiar's I managed to get the piece cleaned up and looking almost like new. Just had to cut it and install it. The thing was still in the airplane years later.
I've seen a few Wing screens saved by the buffing machine method. Seems to work well.
 

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Well, I won the auction, $41 shipped. Seems like a good deal to me. I will try and do the buffing thing though. Keep it in reserve.
 

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The buffer & compound trick worked for my old screen. Probably extended it's life by a few more years. :D
 
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