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If you tested between each leg (A - B, B - C, and C - A) and found 1.5 ohms each pair, if you tested each (A, B, & C) from wire lead to ground and got zero. you've done all you can do until running. 1.5 ohms is in the normal range (between 1 and 2 ohms) indicating continuity. Zero test from lead to ground indicates NO short circuit. There are no moving parts to check. As it sits, your stator has tested OK.

It can of course, fail 5 minutes or 5 years after start up.

Every alternator has a stator. In the car you drive, the alternator has a stator. The rotor is likely a electro magnet consisting of wire wound rotor poles that create a magnetic field when energized. The output can be controlled by supply voltage.

Your 1200 just differs in that the alternator is sharing an engine rear cover housing and it uses a permanent magnet rotor that spins so output depends on engine RPM and any excess current is shunted to ground.

What kills a 1200's stator is vibration (it is engine mounted) and/or heat (breaks down the insulating coating on wire winds) leading to an open winding or shorted winding, and either can happen.

I had a failure in a Comp-U-Fire alternator, but it is a car alternator adapted to use in the 1500. It suffered a failed winding or solder joint in it's rotor winding, something that will not happen with the 1200 rotor, but it could have happened to the C-U-F's stator I think … but not so likely as it is air cooled (1200 stator gets cooled by oil spray, hot and if not changed, corrosive oil).

Smartin said:
So the results of the tests I made would indicate the stator is good?
Yes
 

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Discussion Starter #23
LOL, I hate the 5 minutes or 5 years part... Yes, that's how I performed the test, and those are the results I got... Soooo I guess I'll leave the stator as it sits... Thanks CrystalPistol, I appreciate your input.
If you tested between each leg (A - B, B - C, and C - A) and found 1.5 ohms each pair, if you tested each (A, B, & C) from wire lead to ground and got zero. you've done all you can do until running. 1.5 ohms is in the normal range (between 1 and 2 ohms indicating continuity. Zero test from lead to ground indicates NO short circuit. There are no moving parts to check. As it sits, your stator has tested OK.

It can of course, fail 5 minutes or 5 years after start up.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Bike...and Dennis said:
"If the stator tests good, it is good and replacing it may increase the probability of failure if you mess with it. Clutch plates last hundreds of thousands of miles normally, but with the long sit it might be good to replace the fibers...And check the damper."

What is the damper?
 

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Sonora, California huh? Gold country? Long steep road down from way up high? Beautiful country, was there in '06.

Yeah, if the stator tested good, I'd leave it be. Do pay attention to the first plug on way to regulator near the battery, if it get's hot from resistance induced heat and melts, it will short terminals. Change engine oil regularly to keep clean less corrosive oil in it, and any extra lighting will just use up excess current and ease the load on the bike's regulator. I used a pair of sealed beam 5" Unity fog lights and in use, they steadied the volt meter I had on mine, 37.5 watt times two was 75 watts handled.


321077
 

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I you are an electrician by chance or have a buddy that is using a megger to test the stator would be best. If you take the rear cover off you could take it to a electric motor shop for testing.
Shorted winding or open winding is about all you'll find wrong with a stator, it's pretty simple. The magnet is the permanent magnets encased in the rotor.
Seeing you have the engine out it is a tough decision. If you pass the voltage or/and resistance test it is good today. That doesn't mean it is not going to fail tomorrow. If you can find someone who has a megger it would tell you the condition of the insulation. It is usually the insulation that fails that subsequently causes the short. At a minimum really study the insulation on the stator for signs of heat checking or cracking. I would hate to put everything together only to take it back apart a short time later.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Seeing you have the engine out it is a tough decision. If you pass the voltage or/and resistance test it is good today. That doesn't mean it is not going to fail tomorrow. If you can find someone who has a megger it would tell you the condition of the insulation. It is usually the insulation that fails that subsequently causes the short. At a minimum really study the insulation on the stator for signs of heat checking or cracking. I would hate to put everything together only to take it back apart a short time later.
You and me both. I'll take a look at that when I open it up.
 

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If you do have a bad stator, there is a shop in Birmingham, AL that does rewinds on them. He has some good reports on the quality of his work. You might give them a call to see if you want to go that route.
Custom Rewind
2014 Pratt Hwy, Birmingham, Alabama 35214
(205) 798-7282
(205) 901-7008 cell
 

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Discussion Starter #30
If you do have a bad stator, there is a shop in Birmingham, AL that does rewinds on them. He has some good reports on the quality of his work. You might give them a call to see if you want to go that route.
Custom Rewind
2014 Pratt Hwy, Birmingham, Alabama 35214
(205) 798-7282
(205) 901-7008 cell
Thanks Bellboy40, it's always good to have options.
 
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