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References:

Haynes 1984 – 1987 Goldwing 1200 Shop Manual




http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/view_topic.php?id=49544&forum_id=1&jump_to=673974#p673974



OK, folks, I really am stumped. Here’s the situation. I parked my bike (1986 Aspencade 1200) for the Winter several months ago. I would have had it out well before now, but I ended up with major respiratory ailments, 3 in a row, 1 month each. So, I pull the bike out to see how things are before planning any short trips soon. Everything seemed OK, except the clutch. Before I put the bike away several months ago, the clutch seemed fine, with ample pressure on the clutchhandle when I applied clutch.

Now, the clutch handle is almost free play (almost no pressure at all), so I remove the MC cap and the oil seems low, however, it didn’t appear to be below the ports with the cap on but was with the cap off (just a little below first port). Regardless, I decided to try to remove any air I might have in the lines. I am using a procedure in the referenced manual, combined with the procedure in the referenced GWF post; I happened to use the shop vac approach to jury rig a vacuum pump.

I squeeze the clutch handle (after filling the reservoir) several times (but see absolutely no air bubbles and the handle free plays), secure it closed (pulled in), open the bleeder valve ¼ turn, turn on the shop vac, and the DOT 4 does trickle out (could they have put that bleeder valve in a more God awful place? I had to take half the left side of the bike apart to get to it.). The shop vac is pulling good vacuum, but I don’t see any foaming of the oil. My vinyl lines are as short as I can get them and make the arrangement work.

I go through this procedure several times, but nothing….. no bubbles and no pressure on the clutch handle. I have filled the MC twice so far, so not a lot.

The bike only has 38K miles on it and it is a 1986 model kept in excellent condition and garaged.

Any thoughts would be most appreciated.
 

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If the fluid level dropped during the layup and won't bleed to a firm lever now, sounds like it is leaking from the slave cylinder (at the engine rear) into the engine itself.
 

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Try bleding the air from the system by following the same pump up procedure but instead of using the bleed screw at the slave cylinder crack it at the banjo bolt at the upper end of the line adjacent to the master cylinder. Air likes to hide right there. Make sure you keep the master cylinder full and be very cautious as brake fluid will rapidly destroy paint and plastic. Use plenty of rags or other protection and be prepared to immediately wash off any brake fliud spills........GM
 

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Check your master cylinder to make sure both ports are open. The very small port tends to plug up especially after the bike's been laid up for awhile with old fluid. If that port isn't open it's pretty much impossible to bleed the system.
 

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exavid wrote:
Check your master cylinder to make sure both ports are open. The very small port tends to plug up especially after the bike's been laid up for awhile with old fluid. If that port isn't open it's pretty much impossible to bleed the system.
Interesting, I just came to my office to report that I think I may have a contamination problem. What I thought was discoloration of the master Cylinder bowl due to DOT4, I found out it was sediment. I pulled all the DOT4 from the bowl and cleaned it. The bleeding seems to be a little better, but the clutch is still all the way soft. I did notice, now, that there were very tiny bubbles (undoubtedly due to air in the lines) when I pulled the clutch handle several times.



Any suggestions as to how I could clean that tiny (almost) hidden port?
 

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Go with the advice of pump up and release at banjo fitting it was the only way mine worked. They are a bear to bleed..
 

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It sounds like posssibly your master cylinder or slave cylinder piston is stuck. If your having issues with either this is possibly a good time to look at rebuilding them. The bike might have low miles but time wise she is an older bike and age does come into play.
 

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Mike B wrote:
Go with the advice of pump up and release at banjo fitting it was the only way mine worked. They are a bear to bleed..
OK, here's what I have done. I pumped up the clutch (well, it wasn't much of a pumpup; very little pressure), secured the clutch handle closed (pulled in), and loosened the Banjo bolt. No fluid escaped. I then completely removed the Banjo bolt; still no fluid escaped, so I screwed it back in and tightened it down.

I released the clutch handle slowly and waited about a minute. I then squeezed the clutch handle and there was all sorts of pressure and bubbles. (I have already locked down the lower bleeder which I could barely get a 1/4 turn out of before the wrench could not be turned any more - I had a very small area in which to turn the wrench).

So, I start squeezing the clutch handle, and the fluid darts out of the MC bowl from the upper (tiny) hole (thanks to all those than warned me about protecting the bike; I have plastic around the entire front areas as well as rags). The first 10% to 15% of the clutch squeeze is pretty free, then the rest is quite stiff. Since I have a lot of parts to put back together, I will wait until tomorrow to finish up and test the bike.
 

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Mike B wrote:
Go with the advice of pump up and release at banjo fitting it was the only way mine worked. They are a bear to bleed..
Tested the bike this evening and all is well. The Banjo Bolt did the trick. Many thanks to all that helped. I learned a lot and together we fixed the bike and I had a great ride this evening. :action:
 
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