Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
268 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

So I have noticed that the clutch fluid level window had an orange sticky sludge on it. The fluid was low so I took off the cap and the inside had a lot of orange sludge stuck around the sides and bottom. I tried to wipe it out and remove as much of the fluid as possible without having a bleeder. I added new fluid and it seems to work fine but I know it isn't good.Is it rust? I guess I need to bleed the system as well as the brake one too. Any posts or help on this? 2 months ago I thought changing the oil was a big accomplishment so I am learning but have never bleed any lines on anything in my life.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
354 Posts
imported post

It isn't rust that I know of. Mine was the same way when I bought it and a good bleeding and refill took care of the problem. I believe the orange sludge is deteriorated brake fluid with some contaminants.

Carl
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
268 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
imported post

Any links on how to bleed a clutch reservoir, or could you walk me through it? Thanks I am glad it isn't rust.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,608 Posts
imported post

Brake fluid is "hygroscopic", or absorbs moisture. I believe what the snot is, is water in the bottom of the resivoir. Normal if the fluid is from the ice age! Just a good flush and all will be good! jimsjinx
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
268 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
imported post

Thanks for the info, now about the bleeding process. Anyone want to guide me through that. Keeping in mind I have never bled anything.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
196 Posts
imported post

i found the same stuff in my 1500 clutch reservoir this spring. i "rinsed" the reservoir several times with fresh fluid before bleeding from the reservoir. i figured i did not want to pull any of that stuff into my lines by bleeding before the reservoir was clean. to drain the reservoir, i used a length of clear tubing and suction applied by mouth. i filled the tubing, moved the tubing to a discard container, let it the old fluid run out of the tubing, repeat until reservoir empty. with each successive "rinse", i agitated the fluid in the reservoir to mix as much of the "snot" into the fresh fluid as possible. I stopped rinsing when the new fluid stopped getting cloudy with agitation. cleaning and bleeding this system is an easy next step for a new owner who has successfully changed the oil. keep challenging yourself with new service projects. you'll find a that with a service manual and help from this site, there's not much you can't do.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
26,534 Posts
imported post

There is a clutch bleeding tutorial in the how to section, look to the right of the page and scroll down.
 

·
Vintage Rider
Joined
·
2,410 Posts
imported post

Check your manual for the bleeding process. It gives a good detailed explanation with pictures. My understanding is the clutch is more difficult to bleed than the brakes. The "easy" way to do it is to simply replace the stock bleeder screw with a speed bleeder. This makes it a VERY simple operation. I don't know why new vehicles don't come with these things.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,608 Posts
imported post

The one best thing you could do for your bike, is catch up all the maint.. I just always assume the prev owner did NOTHING on the bike. Fluids,tires,filters,(and there are several),oil, and suspension. The timing belts are pretty tough, but you should think about inspecting them. If one breaks, riding season is over! jimsjinx
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,795 Posts
imported post

The clutch is very easy to bleed.

Steps:
1) Remove cover from master cylinder, for clutch.
2) Use vacuum pump to remove all fluid from mstr cyl, then wipe the insides of the cyl clean with rag.
3) Fill mst cyl with fresh brake fluid.
4) Connect a length of tubing to the Drain Tube coming off the clutch slave cylinder... Located on left side of bike, by your foot, beneath the alternator... looks like a zert (lube) fitting.
5) Apply vaccum to tubing, while opening the drain tube... Pump the clutch as required to get the fluid moving... Continue adding fluid to the mstr cyl as required to prevent any air from entering the system. Flush until the fluid coming out is Clear, and free from bubbles.
6) Close Drain Tube, then remove tubing.
7) Fill mstr cyl to top of view window, then close cover.


Also, odds are good that if the fluid has not been changed in a long time, then you may have rust in the Clutch Slave Cylinder... That would cause rough shifting (with or without this bleed operation). If that happens, then report back.



Edited: Now refers to Clutch Slave Cyl, not Master Cyl
 

·
Junior Grue
Joined
·
8,153 Posts
imported post

ALEX BERECZKY wrote:
Also, odds are good that if the fluid has not been changed in a long time, then you may have rust in the master cylinder... That would cause rough shifting (with or without this bleed operation). If that happens, then report back.
Could you splain that in simple terms (three letters per word or less) for this simpleton?:?:shock:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,735 Posts
imported post

To do the brakes, the procedure is much the same only you have more than 1 place to pull the oil from. The back brakes and front brakes have zirc fittings for each connection, The main thing is to repeat most of the procedure for each connection, keeping the master cylinder full of fluid. I would recommend that you do the brakes at the same time as the clutch and make sure that they are fully operational before riding. :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
815 Posts
imported post

Clutch is dead easy to bleed, only takes a few minutes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,795 Posts
imported post

Ken Bergen wrote:
ALEX BERECZKY wrote:
Also, odds are good that if the fluid has not been changed in a long time, then you may have rust in the master cylinder... That would cause rough shifting (with or without this bleed operation). If that happens, then report back.
Could you splain that in simple terms (three letters per word or less) for this simpleton?:?:shock:
> Sorry, I ment to refer to the "Clutch Slave Cylinder", not the "master cyclinder".

> eg The Slave Cylinder collects a lot of crud because it's at the Bottom of the clutch line, and does not flush very well. The resulting Lack of Movement, of the slave, means that your clutch will not dis/engage in tandom with movement of the clutch lever.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,262 Posts
imported post

+1 on the speed bleeder. For 7.00 you can flush with ease.

When I did mine I drained to near empty then used a q tip to remove the slime. You could use one of these to drain the clutch master.
[line]
(run out to the pharmacy for it)

Also.....there is a small metal part that prevents fluid from squirting out of the reservoir. If you should knock it off it's helpful to take note of it's position before you start cleaning. Speaking of squirting.......make damn sure you keep the fluid off your paint or you will be very disappointed. The bleeder is on your left while sitting on the bike......just above the foot peg after you remove the two plastic panels.

RED
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,287 Posts
imported post

The orange colored stuff is a result of moisture in the brake system. The ethers that make up the corrossion inhibitors have absorbed the moisture and have now turned to the orange color that you see. Rust will sink. It is heavier than the fluid as it isstill a metal. There is no carbon steel in your master cylinder, therefore it is not rust.

The orange color is a result of a chemical reaction not resulting from the metal but from the H2O. It is a designed process of degradation, so don't worry too much.

DOT 3, 4 and 5.1 brake fluid are all glycol-based fluids and designed to operate with a certain amount acceptable moisture with limit. The "DOT SAE" classification of 3, 4 or 5.1 determines the available temperature range and moisture limits.

"DOT 5" is a silicone based fluid and has no moisture classification because silicone does not absorb moisture. There is no moisture limit in a DOT 5 silicone brake system.Dot 5 systems, or silicone brake fluid systems, use the same associated metal parts as used in glycol systems but use different rubber compounds in their various parts such as seals and hoses that do not allow for moisture absorption as easily as the 3, 4 and 5.1 brake systems do.

DOT 3, 4 and 5.1 are hygroscopic as mentioned earlier and disperse moisture throughout the brake fluid. This is why completely flushing the old fluid out is required for maintenance with glycol systems. The H2O is always present at some level because there is always some level detectable in the rubber. The "moisture" will enter the system through the rubber. Know this and expect it. Your owners manual gives a service schedule of some order for its replacement because of it.

DOT 5 silicone fluid is hydrophobic, meaning it does not absorb H2O and will not dispurse it throughout the fluid. The "moisture" will sit on top of the fluid and remain there until removed. DOT 5 fluid usually has no maintenance interval because of the inabillity to introduce H2O into the system.

We cannot mix the two fluids. Once DOT 3, 4 or 5.1 has been used in a brake system, as mentioned there is always a certain amount of "moisture" present. DOT 5 will have reduced performance when H2O is introduced as the compressibillity of water is farhigher than that of brake fluid.

So, it ain't rust and it's normal for what you're seeing if the fluid has not been flushed-out in quite a while. Unfortunately the orange you are seeing is throughout the fluids lines and passages and you're stuck with a good portion of it as a result. Don't worry about it though and just do what you can. Use a toothbrush and scrub the masters reservoir clear of it and flush half a big bottle of it through until runs clear on bothe calipers. Run a clear tube from the bleeder screw at one caliper to a soupcan on the floor and with the master cylinder top off keep filling the reservoir full as you pump the lever to pass the fluid through that caliper. Then do the other side. Keep filling and pumping the lever until the fluid runs clear. Don't worry about pressure bleeding, meaning holding the lever and closing the bleeder then pumping-up the lever again, just keep the reservoir full and pump 'til it's clear. Do it to both calipers and as long as you do not let the reservoir run dry (introducing air) then just close the bleeder screws when you're done. Piece-O-Cake.

Do it again next year, maybe the year after if you're the lazy type, but don't forget to do it in a year or two from now, preferable over the Winter when you've nothing else to do.

...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,318 Posts
imported post

Order a set of these. It will simplify the bleeding process. They just replace the original bleeder screws and make it a one man job to bleed the brakes or clutch. Money well spent in my opinion. Just get the regular ones... no need for the stainless steel ones. You can't see them on the 1500 anyway.

http://www.speedbleeder.com/
 

·
Vintage Rider
Joined
·
2,410 Posts
imported post

I have a MityVac that I used to use to bleed car brakes with, and thought that was easy. Then I discovered SpeedBleeders, and haven't used the MityVac since. On a motorcycle it is simplicity itself. Just install the SpeedBleeder fitting in place of the stock bleeder screw, open it a little bit, so you can pump fluid through it, then use one hand to pump the lever/pedal, while you keep the reservoir full with the other hand. After you've pumped enough fluid through it to be sure you have replaced it all, stop pumping with the reservoir at least half full, tighten the SpeedBleeder fitting, fill up the reservoir, put the cap back on, and you are done.


If you have reason to believe there may be solid particles in the slave cylinder or caliper, first completely remove the bleeder screw and pump some fluid through it. The hole is a lot bigger without the bleeder screw, and will let larger debris pass through. Then install the SpeedBleeder and proceed to bleed the clutch/brakes in the normal way.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
903 Posts
imported post

I am not a mechanic and do not know very much about all this but I have a question. I read where CaptainMidnight85 said "as the compressibillity of water is farhigher than that of brake fluid".Is it possible for a personto compressany liquid with hand power?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,795 Posts
imported post

Larry22935 wrote:
I am not a mechanic and do not know very much about all this but I have a question. I read where CaptainMidnight85 said "as the compressibillity of water is farhigher than that of brake fluid".Is it possible for a personto compressany liquid with hand power?
> I doubt you could compress water... Though water Vapor (eg steam) is a different story, and I believe that's the concern, that if the brake lines get hot enough, then any water present would turn to steam, and you'd get Mushy-ness n the brakes or clutch as it was compressed.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top