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when i ride in the cold my body stays warm but i have issues with my hands & feet.

i am looking for something "cost effective" to keep my hands & feet warmer, personally i'm ok down into the 40s but i'm looking for comfort in the 20s.

i just don't think the heated gloves are worth $300+ for the gloves & wiring for how much i'd use them & don't really like the way the handlebars are covered with the hipo hand type attachments. as far as my feet i wear tipical insulated workboors with 1 or 2 layers of regular socks on, i had the thermal socks in the past but never really helped any more than doubling my regular socks.
 

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Crazzzy, this is going to sound crazy. when i know it's going to be real cold, i put my feet in plastic bags. this tends to trap the warmth on my feet. also works good when traveling long distances in the rain(shoes wet/feet dry).

Robin
 

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Motosickle wrote:
Crazzzy, this is going to sound crazy. when i know it's going to be real cold, i put my feet in plastic bags. this tends to trap the warmth on my feet. also works good when traveling long distances in the rain(shoes wet/feet dry).

Robin
I'll vouch for that tip:cooler:. I only had to use that idea once, and I'll use it again when the time comes.
 

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Something everyone forgets. Mittens. I am now a southern person, If it gets below 40 degrees it is terrible. (it was 24 degrees this morning) A match for the record low ever recorded.

I used to live up North and used to hunt a lot and run snowmobiles for miles and miles.

Mittens-mittens will keep your hands much warmer than gloves and work very well on a motorcycle.

Kit
 

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Electric (D batteries) socks.
 

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A heated vest. Once our body get a bit too warm, it will send the blood to your extremeties to cool it down.
Also, try a silk balaclava under the helmet, the old saying "If your feet are cold, put a hat on" is true. A lot of heat is lost through the head.
 

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DougW wrote:
A heated vest. Once our body get a bit too warm, it will send the blood to your extremeties to cool it down.
Also, try a silk balaclava under the helmet, the old saying "If your feet are cold, put a hat on" is true. A lot of heat is lost through the head.
Both of the above also works for me ...

I have some "Crocodiles" that fit over my boots and cover my lower leg up to just below the knee. I put them on over myjeans, then put windproof pants on over that. It really helpsprevent my lower leg and feet from getting cold.

I just went to the Cabela's web site and did a search ... they have gone up in price since I got mine several years ago. :shock:

But they do help a LOT!
 

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I've got some camo, heated hunting gloves I bought at a out fitters store in Texas some years ago. They have a pocket on the back that you place a "D" cell battery in. They don't have an orr/on switch, once you put the battery in they start to warm up. the batteries usually last 45 minutes to an hr.

I believe they originally cost me 30 bucks for the pair.
 

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I don't know but it was freakin cold this morning when I went to work. 30 mile trip to work at 21 degrees. Actually everything was good except my hands. Can't find an economical pair of gloves to keep them warm. brrrrrrrrr.
found an old pair of Harley gauntlet gloves but I'm afraid age has got the better of them, fingers mostly give me the hardest time to keep warm because without a fairing the wind just keeps pounding them.
 

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I got a pair of these (an earlier model) in a bargain bin at Biketoberfest in 2002 for $5:

http://www.tourmaster.com/xcart/product.php?productid=109&cat=9



I have since bought another set just like these on salefor $65 even though the retail on the web site says $109. I have never had heated anything until this Wing I just bought labor day weekend this year. They also have a highly reflective spot on the gauntlet which helps for being seen at night.

These tourmaster gloves have taken me on numerous rides in the 20S - and even a few inthe teens. Part of the trick is to wear the "rain mitten" when it gets really cold. These are nylon mittens that are stored in the glove gauntlet zip compartment - they break the wind nicely and allow the glove leather and lining to keep you warm without battling windchill as well - the nylon does that.

Goretex socks.


To me cost-effective is a relative term. Each pair has lasted years and could still be worn years to come. So I feel I am definately getting my money's worth - especially when I am somewhere and hadn't planned on 20 degrees - :D
 

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Aerostich has some three finger insulated waterproof mittens that I have found to be the best warm weather glove ever. I am not good with computer so don't know how to do links but I know they are on their wibsite.
I don't work for aerostich or anything like that and it's just my opionion but man do they ever work great for me.
adios
fast black
 

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I think I only paid 120 for my Widder electric gloves. No controller just an on/off switch. They are good in the 20-30* weather we have around here. That was with my V-Star without a fairing. I am pretty sure they'll be toasty with the Wing.
 

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I just ordered a pair of mittens from Cabelas, they are non existent around here, just not enough cold weather I guess. Also ordered the Tulsa hot foot from Honda direct line. that should take care of the parts of me that get cold, only my fingers and toes. I had been riding with my hands on the brake and clutch reservoirs when I could use the cruise to keep them out of the wind and tucking my feet in close to engine for a little warmth.
 

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I have a very old pair of moosehide/beaver mittens which I wear if it is very cold. The thumb is backed with beaver belly fur, very soft and dense. They were custom made by an aboriginal friend up north. They are designed to work with heated grips, so the insulation on the palm is not too thick, lets the heat get in, the fur then helps stop it escaping.

They work, I've used them snowmobiling at -40, and on the bike in the 20s. They are a bit cumbersome, but you can get by with the important stuff, clutch, brake, throttle, indicators and horn.

Mostly they get used ploughing the driveway with the ATV these days.
 

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Look for gloves or socks that have aGore-Tex liner in them. The plastic over your feet is ok, but will actually makeyou feel colder. Gore-Texis a micro filament that will let moisture out so it keeps your skin dryer, but does not let water and wind in. Anything with Gore-Tex in it will be a little pricey, but worth it. We had cold weather and rain gear in the Air force with it init, and was fantastic. The Fire gear we wear now has Cross tech, made by WL Gore, but for fire service, and serves the same purpose. Helps wick moisture away from skin so we will not get steam burns due to sweating while fighting fire.
 

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Kit Carson wrote:
Something everyone forgets. Mittens. I am now a southern person, If it gets below 40 degrees it is terrible. (it was 24 degrees this morning) A match for the record low ever recorded.

I used to live up North and used to hunt a lot and run snowmobiles for miles and miles.

Mittens-mittens will keep your hands much warmer than gloves and work very well on a motorcycle.

Kit
I would agree with Kit on the "mitten" thing...Gloves isolate each finger, thus allowing what little body heat that you might have accumulated to dissapate.. As for me, it doesn't get terribly cold down here, so I went to the local "deer hunting" outlet and bought myself a rather stylish pair of lambskin gloves with a layer of "thinsulate" inside the glove itself...Seems to work prettywell for me, but if it gets much colder, I'm going to hunt me some mittens..
 

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BTW, you do have hand wings or mirror wings don't you?

They keep the wind off your hands very nicely. Well worth the money IMO.
 

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The snowmobile 3 fingeredgloves work really well. I have two types, thumb-1-3 and thumb-2-2. The 2-2 is a bit awkward.

My favorite is the1-1-3, more precise using 1 digit for buttons.On the single index finger when it gets cold I can pull it out & tuck it with the other 3 to warm up without taking off the glove. :cooler:

This1-1-3model I have... http://www.heeters.com/gloves.shtml works nice down to about 20 degree (above F).

Back when I was a young whipper-snapper,on them cold & rainy days, I carried a spray-can of water-repellent.Not needed on to-days water resistant gloves.

Have fun!

.
 

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These are things that work for me.
1) layers on top and bottom.
2) A pair of tights (Yup Womens type) a lot of dispatch riders in london swear by them.
3) Carrier bags on feet.
4) silk balaclava
5) I used to make hand protectors from old oil containers washed out and cut away along the spout side and the split spout goes round the handle bar. The mirror keeps the set up from twisting round. It keeps the wind off the hands. and its cheap.
 

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goldtop wrote:
These are things that work for me.
1) layers on top and bottom.
2) A pair of tights (Yup Womens type) a lot of dispatch riders in London swear by them. :cheeky1:
3) Carrier bags on feet.
4) silk balaclava
5) I used to make hand protectors from old oil containers washed out and cut away along the spout side and the split spout goes round the handle bar. The mirror keeps the set up from twisting round. It keeps the wind off the hands. and its cheap.
2) Better yet, you keep the women IN'em. :cooldevil:

3) Does thecarrier bag size make any difference?
Or they large enough for a warm kitty or two?

5) I REMEMBER THESE!!!... I used to propane-torch
these & mold into the shape I needed. YUP they
work really well., especially the black bottles.
 
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