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76 gl 1000. hey thanks for all the help with the novice questions. here are a couple more. can you do a compression test with the carbs off? and the carbs are aluminum correct? is there anything to fill a small whole eaten through the carb body? its hard to describe exactly where they are. its a very small very shallow hole that does not look any thing like a machined hole. plastic metal? durafix?or should i bite the bullet and get2 new carb bodies. thanks all.
 

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how did something "wear" a hole in the carbs?.... if you are looking for carbs, there is always ebay, but if you rebuild them, I have heard it is best not to seperate them from the plenum as those o-rings are very pricey.

you can do a compression check with the carbs off, however, a compression check is supposed to be done with the engine at operating temperature so it won't be totally accurate.
 

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You want a warmed up engine, remove the spark plugs, and hold the throttle wide open when you to a compression check. You don't need to remove the carbs or air cleaner, with the throttle plates open there won't be enough vacuum to bother about.

Not too sure what you mean by a shallow hole. Does it go all the waythrough some part of the carb body? If it's a corrosion pit and you want to fill it to prevent further corrosion, JB Weld works well.
 

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There are aluminum welding rods out there that melt with just the heat from a propane torch... JC Whitney has them... I found that most epoxy mixes don't hold up with engine heat.

After "welding" the aluminum, just file and polish the area to look like the original surface.. The weld will never separate or deform. It's best to stay with the original carburetor if at all possible..
 

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Renegade wrote:
There are aluminum welding rods out there that melt with just the heat from a propane torch... JC Whitney has them... I found that most epoxy mixes don't hold up with engine heat.
After "welding" the aluminum, just file and polish the area to look like the original surface.. The weld will never separate or deform. It's best to stay with the original carburetor if at all possible..
Those aluminum brazing rods they sell at fairs, car and aviation shows do work pretty well. I've repaired two aluminum radiators with that stuff, one that I soldered over ten years ago is still hanging together fine. It is tricky stuff to get a good bond, the trick with it is to clean the area with non-ferrous material. You can also use a stainless steel brush it it's a new one that hasn't been used on iron or steel. Make a couple test joints on scrap and try to pull them apart until you are sure you're getting proper, strong joining.

Of course if you're just filling pits the quality of the joint isn't crucial.
 
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