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I see a lot of discussion about changing timing belts but nothing about coolant hoses.How long do you think they will last?
 

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Lots of original hoses from the 80's that are still in service. I think they will last near indefinitely if left alone. Mine are 20 years old and never an issue. I bet lots of members will follow with a lot older than mine. You do not save a lot of time if you would end up doing the hoses separately versus with the belts anyway but your decision. :)
 

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If a hose goes you get covered in water so stop, if it happens on a car it can be first you know is it locks up so whilst i replaced 10yr old hoses on the car i never did on a wing
 

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I recall a discussion about this several years ago on another board. It is believed that the hose design that Honda uses is meant to last a reasonable lifetime under normal conditions. Honda knew that the failure of a coolant hose could cause the rider to loose control and crash. So, they chose a heavy duty, long life hose design unlike those found on automobiles. Come to think of it, I haven't had to replace a hose on any car or trucks I've owned for at least 40 years.
 

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Bought some take offs from a low miles bike being parted out after lots of plastic got damaged in crash just to have on hand should one develop a leak. My '97 still has OEM hoses.

In 1986 I bought my '77 F-150, put new hoses on it … in 1986 … because I thought it was a good idea. Longest I've ever run coolant hoses.

Of course I keep good coolant in my vehicles, I watch temps, etc.

Twice in 50 years I've had coolant hose related failures. Once was in 1972 in the Smokies climbing Rt 441 with our '68 Plymouth station wagon, 383 … second time was 1980 on Rt 234 after leaving the area office in my issued '78 Plymouth Gran Fury 440. Both occasions the top radiator hose slipped up partway off the nipple due to a loose clamp, both were fixed with a screw driver, time, and some coolant added back.
 

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I worked on Honda cars for 35 years and the only hoses I ever saw fail had oil leaked on them.
 

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The only coolant hoses I can recall replacing in the last 30 years were about 6 yrs ago the upper rad hose on my '85 Camry (350K mi) developed pinhole leak a half inch back from the radiator neck clamp, and 3 yrs ago upper rad hose on Deb's '99 Grand Prix (185K mi) developed pinhole leak at clamp on thermostat housing. All other tubing (including fuel and vacuum) on all vehicles here (4 cars, 3 bikes) is still original!

I know it's a matter of time before I have to deal with vacuum leaks on the '93 Wing though.... That seems to be endemic to the machine.
 

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The only coolant hoses I can recall replacing in the last 30 years were about 6 yrs ago the upper rad hose on my '85 Camry (350K mi) developed pinhole leak a half inch back from the radiator neck clamp, and 3 yrs ago upper rad hose on Deb's '99 Grand Prix (185K mi) developed pinhole leak at clamp on thermostat housing. All other tubing (including fuel and vacuum) on all vehicles here (4 cars, 3 bikes) is still original!

I know it's a matter of time before I have to deal with vacuum leaks on the '93 Wing though.... That seems to be endemic to the machine.
Denver,
Usually a failure close to a hose clamp is caused by electrochemical degradation, If yoou run coolant too long it becomes acidic and acts like an electrolyte. Add dissimilar metals (aluminum, copper or stainless steel) and you have a battery that will degrade the hose near the necks. You can take a voltmeter and with the red probe in the coolant ground the black probe to the engine block or ground. I have seen voltages that range from 1 to 4 volts. At first glance you might think it is no big deal but remember the ECT sensor is submerged in that battery and usually uses a 5 volt reference signal. That signal can get pretty fouled up when the sensor is dipped in a 4 volt solution. Not to mention the hose degradation..

ELECTROCHEMICAL DEGRADATION (ECD)
Appearance: The number one cause of hose failure! Using your thumb and finger, squeeze the hose near the connectors, ECD initially attacks within two inches of the ends of the hose. If the ends feel more soft and mushy that the middle or if you feel gaps or channels inside the hose, it is most likely under attack by ECD.

Cause: Different kinds of metals in the cooling system generate an electrical charge, which is carried from one component to another by the coolant. This electrical charge can weaken the hose by creating tiny internal cracks in the hose.

Solution: Replace coolant more often. Replace the damaged hose immediately. The best way to avoid ECD failure is to install a hose that fights ECD. Gates electrochemical resistant hoses are your best protection against electrochemical degradation
 

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Interesting.

Coolant in these vehicles gets flushed/replaced every 3-5 yrs, I could be a little more religious about three years, but if you add up the number of coolant hoses in all these vehicles and consider the ages (40, 37, 35, 35, 27, 21 and 11 yrs) of all of them, I'd say a grand total of two failures is not bad.
 

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Hmmm,
interesting.

the coolant on my Pontiac Vibe ( ala Toyota Matrix ) is still the factory stuff from 2007.
John, I am more frugal than most but I can tell you that you are taking a real chance at 13 year old coolant. Unless you have low miles. A good rule of thumb in my opinion is that all fluids get changed at 100K. Coolant, ATF, power steering fluid, brake fluid the works except washer fluid and motor oil if not due. I'm sure the guys will chine in and tell you how many head gaskets they changed because the coolant became acidic and ate the head gasket up. Well the electrolysis did. If those were my vehicles I would do them really soon unless they are low mileage. Cheap insurance against a sure thing. :)

If you want to try something put the red probe in the coolant and the black probe to a good ground. See what kind of voltage it reads especially if the coolant is warm. Not hot of course.
 

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Interesting.

Coolant in these vehicles gets flushed/replaced every 3-5 yrs, I could be a little more religious about three years, but if you add up the number of coolant hoses in all these vehicles and consider the ages (40, 37, 35, 35, 27, 21 and 11 yrs) of all of them, I'd say a grand total of two failures is not bad.
It just struck me as odd they both failed by the necks and it reminded me. You are right that 2 hoses over the years is not bad, The new synthetic hoses are so much better than the old hoses. I always thought silicone was the way to go for years. A while back I read an article that said it is not necessarily true. Seems silicone is more porous and coolant can weep out over time.
 

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If you want to try something put the red probe in the coolant and the black probe to a good ground. See what kind of voltage it reads especially if the coolant is warm. Not hot of course.
I'm going to have to try that, never heard of it before. I do have some test strips that show the acidity.
 

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John, I am more frugal than most but I can tell you that you are taking a real chance at 13 year old coolant. Unless you have low miles. A good rule of thumb in my opinion is that all fluids get changed at 100K. Coolant, ATF, power steering fluid, brake fluid the works except washer fluid and motor oil if not due. I'm sure the guys will chine in and tell you how many head gaskets they changed because the coolant became acidic and ate the head gasket up. Well the electrolysis did. If those were my vehicles I would do them really soon unless they are low mileage. Cheap insurance against a sure thing. :)

If you want to try something put the red probe in the coolant and the black probe to a good ground. See what kind of voltage it reads especially if the coolant is warm. Not hot of course.
Life got in the way a bit of 3 years ago, when my wife succumbed to Diabetes, was in hospital for most of a year..... the car went from 64k to 100k in a heart beat.

I just looked up the local Toyota dealers, will call them Monday for price shopping... I hate Tulsa, hope that Bartlesville gives me a good price.
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EDIT: found this:
According to the Pontiac Vibe manual, the coolant in the vehicle should last for five years or 500,000 miles, which ever occurs first... guess the years have expired, but the mileage is okay at 104,500 so far.

. Just watched a lot of YouTube videos, think I will do all of it except maybe the brakes.... not sure on that yet.

.
 

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Coolant for diesels is almost like being a chemist.. You have to maintain a level of diesel coolant additive at the same time you need to control PH (higher than 7.0 but not to exceed 10.0) and mixture strength. Now there is DEF (diesel exhaust fluid) also.

 

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Life got in the way a bit of 3 years ago, when my wife succumbed to Diabetes, was in hospital for most of a year..... the car went from 64k to 100k in a heart beat.

I just looked up the local Toyota dealers, will call them Monday for price shopping... I hate Tulsa, hope that Bartlesville gives me a good price.
.
EDIT: found this:
According to the Pontiac Vibe manual, the coolant in the vehicle should last for five years or 500,000 miles, which ever occurs first... guess the years have expired, but the mileage is okay at 104,500 so far.

. Just watched a lot of YouTube videos, think I will do all of it except maybe the brakes.... not sure on that yet.

.
Life got in the way a bit of 3 years ago, when my wife succumbed to Diabetes, was in hospital for most of a year..... the car went from 64k to 100k in a heart beat.

I just looked up the local Toyota dealers, will call them Monday for price shopping... I hate Tulsa, hope that Bartlesville gives me a good price.
.
EDIT: found this:
According to the Pontiac Vibe manual, the coolant in the vehicle should last for five years or 500,000 miles, which ever occurs first... guess the years have expired, but the mileage is okay at 104,500 so far.

. Just watched a lot of YouTube videos, think I will do all of it except maybe the brakes.... not sure on that yet.

.
If you run the Dexcool much over 100K it turns to mud. I have no idea where GM comes up with those numbers but people who tried to stretch it out ended up with head gasket, intake and water pump issues.

 

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If you run the Dexcool much over 100K it turns to mud. I have no idea where GM comes up with those numbers but people who tried to stretch it out ended up with head gasket, intake and water pump issues.

The Pontiac vibe aka toyota matrix uses toyota coolant, not dexcool, same red color but it is ethylene glycol.
 
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