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What do you guys think about copper plugs for a GL1000? I have a friend who says he swears by copper plugs on older bikes because of the ability to fire through he!! and high water (or oil as the case may be).

I was told to buy the standard NGK plugs for this bike and be satisfied with that, but do you think I should give copper plugs a try and why?
 

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They are good but an even better plug is Irridium, but, they are expensive and worth the extra money because they last for many more miles than standard plugs and will fire much more easily under load.

Vic
 

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I'd second the recommendation of iridium plugs for the bikes with point ignition since the fine wire plugs will fire with lower applied voltage. Once you get to the newer models with electronic ignition I think the advantage pretty much fades due to the higher ignition voltage available.
 

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I run NGK's on mine & Susan's gl1000's, & change them each winter when I change the oil & filter. Not because they need it, it just something I do. Both bikes have electronic ignitions, & the carbs are well balanced. I keep the set of old plugs in the glove box (old habits die hard) until I change them again.

Would there be an advantage to running these Irridium plugs with an electronic ignition??? I can't imagine our machines performing any better than they already do.;)
 

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Hi Frenchy, from my personal experience I see several advantages of the irridium over the regular plugs. I currently have over 20,000 k's on the same set of irridium plugs and these plugs hardly show any signs of wear. My bike starts at the touch of the button every time, idles smoothly, revs to 7500 rpm without missing a beat. This tells me that there must be something better about these plugs. I think that the fine and sharp edgedpositive electrode keeps the spark directed to ground better than the rounded edges of a regular used plug (this is what causes a plug to malfunction after extended use.) The reason the positive electrode can be so tiny in diameter is directly because the irridium wire is extremely durable and a very good conductor as well. The small tip also allows for for higher tip temperature which would allow for a cleaner burning plug, also the small tip makes a smaller target for contaminating particles to cling to thereby helping the plug to fire better. Because of all of the above I can see these plugs helping the ignition system to live longer because it won't have to work so hard to push the electricity across the plug gap.

These plugs are more expensive, but, gauging by what I've experienced so far I don't see the need for carrying spare plugs since they have never ever fouled once even when I started my 84 Wing in sub zero temperatures. I have also seen a slight improvement in fuel economy since using these plugs.

Theoretically and in practice these plugs have proven themselves to me, but, you'll have to try a set yourself and let us know your experience if you really want to know for sure.

Vic
 

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I'll have to try some. Where do you get these Irridium plugs at?

I haven't had to use any of the "spare plugs", but it's an old habit.:D
 

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Frenchy, I got my NGK Iridiums at Advance Auto. $8.00 a piece and even though they had to order them, I had them in 2 days.

Like GW says, my 83 I starts at the push of a button. Idles smooth, never loads up. They'll be in there for a while.

BTW, do you folks use just a dab of anti-sieze when you put in new plugs? My mechanic says that's okay but be careful of torque as the anti-seize will give you lighter than normal readings when you're actually already there.

Regards,

Hobie
 

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Not using anti-seize when threading steel into aluminum is asking for disaster. I've had to cut and drill a spark plug out of an aluminum head two times, on was an outboard the other a car. Don't want to do that again. I've never had a plug come loose using the stuff. I just torque them down to the recommended torque. Use just a little bit, I just put a thin 1/8" diameter or so dot on the lower threads of the plug, the stuff will spread over the threads as you screw it in.
 

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Can anyone give me a part number for the Iridium plugs that they have used for their GL1200? I would like to get a set and need to know a part number to order.
 

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I would think who ever you order the plugs from can cross reference them if you have the plug # you are currently using.

Bob :11grey:
 

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Not to worry about me. I used just a dab to coat the threads, then tightened them down to specs. Besides, these are 100,000 plugs and should last me forever!

Thanks for the follow up,

Regards,

Hobie
 

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Hobie1 wrote:
Frenchy, I got my NGK Iridiums at Advance Auto. $8.00 a piece and even though they had to order them, I had them in 2 days.

Like GW says, my 83 I starts at the push of a button. Idles smooth, never loads up. They'll be in there for a while.

BTW, do you folks use just a dab of anti-sieze when you put in new plugs? My mechanic says that's okay but be careful of torque as the anti-seize will give you lighter than normal readings when you're actually already there.

Regards,

Hobie

Thanks Hobie, I went to a large local cycle parts shop, & got a raised eye brow when I asked about them....................................... I'll swing by Advanced this evening.:cheeky1:
 

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Vic,

Have a 1975 Honda GL1000...can you recommend WHICH NGK Iridium plug would be best for my bike?
 

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domscorpiorlg,

You must have been doing a search. That thread is two years old :D

Welcome to the forum though, now that your question has come to light, I am sure that a GL1000 guru can answer it for you.

Have a nice day,
John :)
 

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Hi Robert, the Irridium plug that NGK recommends for your bike is NGK DR8EIX gapped at 0.028" but don't be shocked at the price because these plugs are not cheap. The bonus is that they just about last forever compared to regular plugs. As an example, I use irridium plugs in my car and the manufacturer recommends 100,000 mile spark plug replacement intervals and that's with an extremely high energy ignition system, your Wing puts out about 1/4 the voltage that my car does which means that the plugs have to do much less work.

Vic
 
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