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I took a course this past Sunday put on by http://www.accidentscene.org . They have chapters and classes in most states and the cost is very reasonable. The course I took is called A Crash Course For The Motorcyclist. It was an 8 hour course costing $55.00 and for those who are EMT's or nurses you earn continuing education credits.

Basically it is a course that teaches you how to secure the accident scene and give aid to the injured motorcyclist while waiting for EMS services to arrive.

I could not imagine how it would take around 8 hours as CPR and first aid are covered only briefly as it is understood that you know something a bought both topics.

Topics like removing a full face helmet from someone who has stopped breathing without doing further damage to the neck and rescue breathing without tilting the head back were covered. Also securing the scene, traffic control, clearing an area for rescue vehicles, preventing further damage to the injured, spine immobilization wearing a helmet and much more were covered.

Except for a couple 10 minute breaks and a 30 minute lunch it was an all day, extremely informing class. With the long winter months ahead of us it may be worth checking into.

Ride long and often.
 

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Hopefully every ride will have someone trained in this sort of thing. As much as we don't like it bad things happen.
 

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I'm glad that they are so many topics here that deal with safety, even the unfortunate posts that our members have posted about their own accidents. Each of these stories help us first of all to be thankful for the health that we have, and to remember the importance of a constant awareness of safety.
I'm enjoying riding more than ever, and while that is good, it can lead to a bit of complacency. As we are talk about safety we help one another be better riders.

Chuck
 

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Here in Arizona, they teach all EMTs to NOT remove a helmet.

That is to be done only in the ER under a doctor's care.
 

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Riding North on Hwy 7 a few years ago, I had about six sport bike riders blow by me doing wheelies, running well over 80 to 90 MPH. I caught up with them about 5 miles up the road. One had misjudged a left hand curve that was not banked properly.

He had gone through a sign and was laying about 25 feet off the road. His bike as about 250 feet from him upside down in the bushes.

The only experience I have is dealing with sports injuries, but I figured that was better than none at all. I was concerned that this wassix teenagers that would not know anything about how to take care of any type of injury.

As it turned out I was right. The boy had a broken leg and a bad injury on his sternum where the sign hit him in the chest. He was conscious and talking to his friends. As I walked up,he ask them to help him take his helmet off, which they started to do. :shock:

I got that stopped, andI tried to make sure he remained still until the ambulance arrived.

Theydidn't haveany ideahow to deal with their injured friend.:baffled:
 

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AZgl1500 wrote:
Here in Arizona, they teach all EMTs to NOT remove a helmet.

That is to be done only in the ER under a doctor's care.
Whatcha gonna do if they aren't breathing at all? You can't just stand there and watch them die. If they aren't breathing, you only have two choices, you either don't try at all, or you take the helmet off. I think that's what they are getting at. Teaching how to do it in those circumstances, when there isn't any other choice.
 

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Yes, if they are not breathing there is a method to remove the helmet but it takes two people to do it properly. That is the method they showed us and we all had to demonstrate it. Of course if you are alone and the person has stopped breathing you have few choices left.
 

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The health care profession ( hospital & rehab facilities - not primary care workers) can work with neck injuries, they can't work with dead bodies. Same as with an airway obstruction, foreign objects can be removed from the stomach & lungs if it get's pushed down during a rescue attempt. This was a choice we were given in training if there was no help available & your back is in a corner. As a retired paramedic ( 35 years) you hope it's a choice you never have to face. :waving::waving:
 

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Being retired LE, I've seen much. Broken lega & such are not inportant. Keep immobile, stop bleeding with compress, treat for shock, watch blood loss, secure scene [so victim doesn't get injured again]....try NOT to move the person/people.

Good idea to learn First Aid & reertify regular. We don't ever want to to see things like this wing. Vehicle ran light, this spring, rider didn't make it.

[ Probably best not to show pic]
 

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Token Canuk
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Popeye, what's an "LE", I'm familiar with "Retired" ?
 

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Roger that, Roger :waving::waving:
 
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