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I have a slow leak on the front tire so while changing out the front fork springs I decided to put a new tire on the rim, thinking that the tire was probably the issue.

After taking the rim to the Local Honda shop the service guy removed the old tire from the rim then said that the new tire would never seat. Apparently, the inside of the tire and rim had oxidation and that I needed to have the rim sand blasted then powder coated. If I didn't then the "fungus" would come back. Has anyone seen this before?

Is this something I can fix myself without having to take it somewhere and having it sand blasted and powder coated? This is an '85 Aspy and i bought it almost a year ago. Not sure where the the bike was at prior to that; I bought it on eBay from a gentleman in Daytona. What do you guys think, is this DIY or should I take it in to the professionals?





EDIT: Fixed the title for you
 

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Looks like it may have had fix-a-flat in it. If you have a hand held grinder with a wire brush you could do it yourself then spray it with clear enamel to protect it and use bead sealer on the tire.
 

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Looks pretty rough don't it !!! :) A classic example of a product called SLIME.

I think I would run by a hardware store and purchase a wire wheel, the kind you can chuck into a grinder and knock the scale and crud off. If the wheel is not pitted along the sealing edge it should be alright to use. If it is pitted, I would just throw it away.

Wear eye goggles with a wire wheel, perhaps the most dangerous shop item one can ever use.

Kit
 

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Yeah thats slime , it will come off and won't come back if you bury a dead frog in a cemetary at midnight on palm sunday, but you have to wrap a red string around it's left front leg thats 6 inches long , after its buried at 9 inches deep you have to say these words , SLIME SUBLIME GO AWAY
GO BACK TO BELZEBUB RIGHT AWAY,
Then walk home backwards without looking down . drink 3 glasses of water from the back side of the glass and stay in bed for 12 hours .

I swear that this works , I got it from Madame Marie Laveau personally!!!!

NAAAAHHHH!!! I think your shop is just trying to get some business.
 

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Yep. That's that Slime, FlatFix, No More Flats......or whatever.......sheer rubbish.

Clean it the best you can, but be warned.....it WILL return.....

The same sort of stuff blew the beads from my tyres four times before I eventually got rid of it. You might think it's clean, but it recurs for some reason..:baffled::baffled:
 

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Fix-a-flat, I didn't think of that! Thanks guys! I'll see if I can clean it up with the wire brush and drill. Chippy01, when you said you eventually got rid of it, did you mean the rim or the crud?
 

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I would use a fine wire brush, so as to not scratch up the sealing edges of the rim. And polish the sides so to get the best seal possible.,,
 

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a light coat of oil should seal the rim from any further oxidation.

As BIG C said a fine wire brush and maybe some fine steel wool to get close to a polish finish on the beads.



Just please wear a respirator , aluminum oxide dust is harmfull
 

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evolbob wrote:
Fix-a-flat, I didn't think of that! Thanks guys! I'll see if I can clean it up with the wire brush and drill. Chippy01, when you said you eventually got rid of it, did you mean the rim or the crud?
I mean the crud.
I used a brass wire brush to clear the heavy deposits, then went over the area with a fine wire wool.
Got it all nice and clean and shiney, then cleaned out the tyre.
Refitted everything, but within a year the tyre was losing pressure again. Took it all apart and lo and behold, the crud had returned.
I had to go through this process a number of times before it finally sealed for good.
I don't know if it returned because of a reaction with the alloy, or if it was because I was still using the original tyre.
Perhaps if I had put on a new tyre, I may not have had the recurrance.

That's my experience of it. And I will NEVER use anything in my tyres except for air!!
 

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I carry a plug kit for thos times that i get a piece of glass or nail in the tire. This is a temporary fix so i can get home safe and take the tire to a repair guy. many can do teh repair with the rim still on the bike.
 

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If it's a fungus after scrubbing use a fungicide or wash down the wheel and tire with a solution of bleach, let it dry completely.
 

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I had this same problem on a Yamaha Venture Royal I used to ride.

It sure looked terrible after I pulled it apart. Kinda worse than yours. I had big globs of the stuff in there. Tire Slime is my guess too.

I scrubbed mine with a Hand held wire brush dipped in Gasoline, ( Still cheaper than most solvents by the gallon )

Then I finished it off with wire wheels in a drill.

I then polished the bead surfaces with small buffing wheels in a drill again.

I had to grind a couple spots where someone had dug the rim up with tools while mounting or un-mounting tires.

When I mount my tires I use a Dish Detergent/water mix that gives me lubrication when mounting and leaves a slight tacky surface when it dries.

I have heard of using a Water/ Anti Freeze mix as they say it slightly melts the rubber bead and gives a great seal.

Anybody else ever heard that?

Yes, **** Can the tire as you will have it back over and over again if you reuse the tire.

I wouldn't worry about the bleach or even using Acid much as after that wash you are going to rinse a couple times good then wire wheel and polish the rim.

We will all be dead before anything effects that Rim after those steps.

Good Luck

Mohawk
 

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I was wondering if the air used in the tire, had high amounts of oil and moisture that would cause corrosion like that.Almost looks like an old aluminum storm door in a house by the ocean.,,
 

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Air from compressors that seldom get drained is acidic and has a caustic reaction depending on the various metals it comes in contact with. There are no filters that can trap gaseous components, but changing the oil and cooling the air leaving the compressor helps turn these gases back into a small liquids which can be trapped. Most air dryers are refrigeration systems that reduce the overall liquid to about 50% RH, but desiccant dryers which adsorb the small particles of moisture dry to -40 F. But most of us do not use these dryers and an easier way to get dry(er) compressed air especially if you live in cold climates is to put the compressor in the basement and pipe the air to the garage. Install a liquid trap between the compressor and end use and the difference in temperature will take a lot of moisture out, but maintenance is involved. Having the compressor inside also helps with splash lubrication systems and having cold starts.
 

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muaymendez1 you are absolutly correct !

That is why the application has to dry, but before it does scrub the affected area to minimize all the crap. Then rinse with clean water and inspect, if the area is pitted and probably is, these pits or holes must be checked for letting air leaks deflate the assembly. Smoothing, cleaning and possibly covering the wheel may be needed, the joys of aluminum.
 

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i would definately blast it and then treat the and powder coat it. that should last as long as the bike. i just think blasting it would get it better than the wire brush. jmo.
 

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I should first say that my air leak was really bad, the tyre would deflate to zero PSI after standing for a fortnight. After a dealer failed to fix the problem on my 1500 I finally decided I had had enough and would tackle the problem myself.

Right, rear wheel first. I whipped the rear wheel out of the Goldwing (hah!) and had the tyre removed. The rim was still coated with dried out Stop Flat and corrosion. So much for the dealer obeying my explicit written instructions!

A friend kindly wire brushed the inside of the rim on his workshop equipment and I finished his sanding work and removed the valve. I cleaned the rim with solvent, Methy Ethyl Ketone (spray thinners). There was also crud under the valve, which I cleaned out and refitted the valve with gasket sealant.

I then painted the inside of the rim with clear two pack epoxy polyurethane paint which sealed any possible porosity and made the inside of the rim smooth, hopefully this will assist tyre seating. This paint is expensive and any you don't use after mixing is wasted but it sets rock hard.

The tyre bead also had corrosion and crud on it so I also cleaned that with solvent and had the tyre refitted. I replaced the wheel in the bike and reassembled the panniers so that I could remove the front wheel (easier, that is a 'whip out' compared to the rear wheel!). I gave this the same treatment and put this back in the bike and inflated the tyres to 40 psi and waited...

After a 7 week interstate trip they STILL have 40psi in them! Success! What lessons did I learn here? Don't rely on professionals and keep potential causes of corrosion out of your tyres!
 
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