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I inherited several of my dads homemade tools for aircraft engines and airframes. I also have been known to make my own tools including several modified wrenches, sockets and the latest was the tool to take the forks apart for rebuilding.....

They might be ugly but they sure are functional....
 

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To get those stubborn brake pistons out of the calipers:

A Zerk grease fitting threaded into an M10 nut. Screw it into the caliper, a couple of pumps on the grease gun, and out pops the piston.
 

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any tool that works and keeps you from skinning half your knuckles off is a complete sucess
 

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I had posted to this thread when it first came up over "home made tools"...I can't help but think of that saying about "Necessity is the mother of invention"....Just think how many tools that you go to tool stores and buy that make all of our lives easier, and think every time you pick up a new wrench..."Who would have thought this up"????....People just like you and me needing to do a job, and no factory made tool to do it with.....

With that in mind this house that we live in was built in 1957, no air nailers, every nail put in with a hammer....Every pipe was most likely hand cut and hand threaded....This house and the others here like it, had crews of workers hammering nails cutting boards, installing the piping and electrical, even the sheet rock was hand nailed in.....Now with the advent of more and more air tools, power hand tools, what used to take months is now finished out in weeks.....

So the question of "Home made tools"????....Who knows next year those "home made tools" might be in your local tool store, and you will buy one thinking "Why didn't I think of this???"....You did but someone else seen it in a bigger and a flasher version, and they now set on tropical beaches, watching the tides roll in and out, drinking beverages of their choice, while you buy their "Home made tool".....

So if you have a "Home made tool" and its something that others might buy it could be in your best interests to patent it and get it on the market....:?....
 

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Here's my custom Power Constant Vacuum Super Deluxe One-handed Brake Bleeder for dealing with the complicated linked braking system on my Honda ST1300 sports tourer!

The white PVC elbow is a perfect fit for a round wand on our old Hoover.....stick in the wand, turn the Hoover on, and with me working a wrench on the caliper nipple, and with Red pouring fresh brake fluid into the reservoir, we can bleed the damn brakes!

The constant gentle suction from my home-built tool does the job!
 

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Still a winger at heart.
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Xtracho wrote:
I can't even draw a straight line with Photoshop!
Hold down the shift key while drawing your line. That will constraint it to a straight line...
 

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Similar to Cousin Jacks....
I needed drain my gas tank on the 1100 without removing it and the bike was not running at the time. I put a gas can on the floor next to it, and ran a 1/4" hose through the gas cap opening on the tank into the can. Then simply place the shop-vac nozzle over the gas can hole that had the hose running in. Turned on the vac and sealed it as best as I could with my hands for a few seconds, a siphon was created and then the vac tuned off and the flow ran nicely. Not really a special tool but better than sucking on the end of the hose to get the flow going.
 

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Many years ago, I made a clutch nut removal tool.
I welded 4 pieces of square stock to a socket to fit the 4 square notches in the nut. It worked really well, but looked like poop!
 

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drones76 wrote:
Similar to Cousin Jacks....
I needed drain my gas tank on the 1100 without removing it and the bike was not running at the time. I put a gas can on the floor next to it, and ran a 1/4" hose through the gas cap opening on the tank into the can. Then simply place the shop-vac nozzle over the gas can hole that had the hose running in. Turned on the vac and sealed it as best as I could with my hands for a few seconds, a siphon was created and then the vac tuned off and the flow ran nicely. Not really a special tool but better than sucking on the end of the hose to get the flow going.
There used to be a contest where the competitors would blow up old vacuum cleaners by doing something similar to that. Very much not recommended.

Points were earned for height, length and duration of flame. Bonus points for altitude of the exploding machine.
 

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My little hand pump gets its share of duty. With some parts from a pen (I love pens), a red tube from most any spray can lube, some electrical tapeand a section of battery drain hose, ..I'm cleaning carburetors in any driveway.













In a driveway, you do what you gotta do. I usually don't need high pressure air to clear a carb circuit as I use chemical and wire for that, but I do listen to the air coming from those circuits with this little set-up when I think I'm done. If the air "sounds" equalized in its pitch on a single stroke compared to the other three, then I know I'm good and clean. If the air sounds off-pitch to the others, then I know I'm not done cleaning that particular circuit. More of a testing tool than a cleaning tool. I haven't had a chance to use it for a while until lately. Gotta stay fresh, you know. Don't let it fool you though, that little bicycle hand-pump can pump-up the pressure and clear a circuit if need be... I've got a squeeze-clamp I can put on the tubing at the white section if I need pressure.
 

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CaptainMidnight85 wrote:
My little hand pump gets its share of duty...I'm cleaning carburetors in any driveway.


In a drive gotta stay fresh, you know. Don't let it fool you though, that little bicycle hand-pump can pump-up the pressure and clear a circuit if need be... I've got a squeeze-clamp I can put on the tubing at the white section if I need pressure.
Nice back flushing tools you have there.
I asked Steve several months ago if there was anyone doing such a thing to bike carbs on the bike, he knew no-one.

Only problem is if & when you do this back flushing, where does the contaminants go? Mine went on the walls, tho it sometimes looked like some weird artist visited.

Years ago I did this to my Honda 500-4 and Yam-XS1100, they were simple Mikuni but this Wings carbs are rather intricate. I've used low air pressure behind the cleaners to give a little extra PUSH to get it all out. Messy yah, but clean.
 

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WAY way back in the late 70's I had a truck U-Bolt who's high-nuts were so stubborn I torched it in half in the middle of the U-Bend to get it off.
I saved those 2 pieces since they looked real interesting.
I had no real sturdy pry-bars,... yet. But I did have a 5 foot long railroad pry-bar... MAN-O-MAN does that come in handy... HEAVY!!! but handy.

Anyways...
After grinding a flat on the curved end and further grinding a recessed lip, then mildly tempering the tip, I had a rather handy NON-SLIP tool.

I still have those 2 pry-bars and use them several times a year. SUPER for prying but also great in pounding out inaccessible items where a hand cannot reach, like "steering head bearing races".

Only drawback I have is the Snap-on driver secretly took a picture of my bar and sent it in to be evaluated. In the picture you can see what tool they developed. NOT A CENT did I earn.

Curious,... how many of you have bought this Snap-on pry-bar?
:?
 

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