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I got my 1500 a little wetter than usual when washing it (used a pressure washer on low power like I always do). I ran the battery down when trying to start it afterwards. I put it on the charger and when I tried an hour later it fired right up. I assume I got something in the ignition wet, which dried out in an hour, but wasn't sure where to look. (Hate for it to happen again on the road.) I know I got the ignition key area pretty wet, but didn't remove the side covers, so I don't think I got water in the 'innards'. Anybody got any suggestions of where to look? Thanks!
 

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Spark plug drains?? on 1100's they can get plugged and make the plugs ground out. coils and or wires to them. Try running the bike in a dark garage spray some water at the coils and wires..look for arcing..if see it there's your issue.
 

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I agree with RB, unblock the drain holes first. As the bike is dry by now, you probably don't have any need to worry about permanent damage.
 

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Thanks guys. Didn't realize I had drain holes but that sounds like a likely culprit. Think I'll get a new set of plugs and make it a multi-purpose mission when I start removing the Tupperware.
 

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With the result that you got from washing that bike, I suggest that you do a very good cleaning and wipe down of the ignition system from primary voltage but mainly the secondary high voltage components, all of them.

With time contaminants along with just a little water, could be vapor as well as liquid play havoc with the high voltage.

From coil to plugs the distance is short but with a dampened grime covered insulators that distance is made even shorter and it is always to ground.

The ground is a main receiver.

A grounded out insulator via a wet concoction of dirt/water will travel to the nearest ground and by-pass the intentional ground, the spark plug grounded electrode.

Cleanliness is a must! The spark plug is under pressure of compression while a near shorted insulator is at atmospheric pressure; the lower pressure is easier to conduct. Remember electricity will take the path of least resistance.

Dirt and water lessen the resistance.

You can spray silicon type sprays but I do not recommend them, the best is to wash down with a clean cloth, dampened with water and wipe until no dirt on the cloth. Make sure all electrical joints, HV and primary are clean, crap free, tight. This is an annual PM.
 

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I have heard that spraying hi pressure water directly on the kill switch on the right side control can be an issue.


Bill
 

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could of been a flooded kill switch too
 

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Clear the plug drain holes .
At night or in a dark garage , use a spray bottle and mist water onto the spark wiring . Start bike and look for arcing .
 
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