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One way to to buy a hone set they are usually 3 stone pads on spring loaded flex steel. You use a drill to start them spinning and expanding outward..while in the bore..moving in and out evenly until you have honed them clean..

Very fine steel wool or jewelers cloth, emery paper, 2000 grit sand paper??? Any very very fine 'sanding" material that will remove glaze but not metal. Hard to do it evenly.

Might even be a solvent that will eat glaze but not metal..CLR???
 

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Honing done correctly needs to leave a 60 degree cross hatch pattern in the bore. To do this takes practice, the speed of the hone and moving it in and out of the bore at the right speed is the secret.
 

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Check for ring ridge at top of cylinder. If it is present, find a ring ridge removal tool. This is very important if new rings are being installed.
 

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Not to be contradictory, but I've seen cylinders ruined with a ridge reamer. Use caution, in the wrong hands they can install a gouge that cannot be removed. Check the allowable ridge (taper) and hone accordingly. The danger of a ridge is the new rings will strike the ridge and break, but if there's that much of a taper, it's re-machine the bore time. Most straight cut cylinder hones will clean up a small ridge. The rotating ball type was my favorite, in my hands it was fool resistant, but not proof.
 

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If you are talking about de-glazing the cylinder bores without engine disassembly, there is a product that I know works to a certain extent. Mercury Marine has a product that is mostly sold to dealers for there use, but it is also retailed. It is called Power Tune. The basics are: warm up engine, spray Power Tune into intake while engine is at slightly above idle. Then, use the rest of the contents to "snub out" the engine with the product. Let the engine cool down for about 1/2 hour and restart. I have seen many marine engines that have had extreme problems with glazing from extended trolling time that have been re-born from the stuff. Sea-Foam is probably just as good a product for this, but I don't have first hand experience with it. With either product, get ready for a lot of smoke and only use it outdoors or the neighbors will be calling the local fire department for you

:boo:

Tim
 

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So, you wouldn't work for Mercury Marine up there, would you?
 

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:cool::cool::cool:

Tim
 
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