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02 GL1800 w/Auto Pilot
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Yeah and 30 miles of that was 85 mph馃憤馃憤
never, ever, had a 1500 that would do better than 33 mpg average over the span of a year.
one tank of fuel with a Tailwind, yes.

Downhill, yes, but all the time, no way.


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Discussion Starter #22
My BIL has 95 1500 but his won鈥檛 get the mileage mine does,don鈥檛 understand why,I did cut my windshield down so I can see over it if I need to.
 

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02 GL1800 w/Auto Pilot
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both of the 1500s that I owned, a 94 and a 98, had the Tulsa Tall windshields....
those things are like holding up a sheet of Plywood in the wind.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
both of the 1500s that I owned, a 94 and a 98, had the Tulsa Tall windshields....
those things are like holding up a sheet of Plywood in the wind.
That might be why I get good fuel mileage,I鈥檓 not too easy on the throttle so If anyone were gonna get poor fuel image it would be me,
A side note,my Avon rear tire has 9000 miles and looks AWSOME
 

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That might be why I get good fuel mileage,I鈥檓 not too easy on the throttle so If anyone were gonna get poor fuel image it would be me,
A side note,my Avon rear tire has 9000 miles and looks AWSOME
I am not surprised. I ran 4 sets of Avon Tyres on my GL1500 with good performance, wear and mileage.....!!:D

Yep, One Hundred Thousand miles on Avon's.....!!
 

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Hey, Just wondering if they was big gallons or LITTLE gallons? US or Imperial gallons?
There is quite a difference
the same size gallon that I have used since I was a baby in swadling clothes, all in USA gallons.

Also, I don't recall ever seeing a gasoline pump in the Lower 48 states that measured quantities in anything other than US Gallons, every pump has a sticker on it stating that fact.
 

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I wondered because of this why the US and UK gallons are different.

Way back - at the time we all lived together - we had used the Queen Anne's gallon of 3.785l to measure wine. We also had different volumes and names to measure both beer and grain. When we realized that this was silly, in 1824, the UK chose a single imperial term and lumped together all three measurements, picking a roughly-average volume and calling it a gallon. American colonists, though, stuck to tradition and kept just the Queen Anne's volume for their own gallon definition.
 

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Just another thought about the fuel light. being dim. With the thermistor coming in to play I wonder if the proper bulb is more important. Most bulbs on the 2500 are pretty forgiving as most are either on or off. I wonder if this application needs a very specific bulb to work properly. If you look at the parts book it is confusing. It lists different voltages etc. It might be worth some investigation to be sure you have just the right bulb as when the parts book list it as a T10 that is only the type of base that will fit. Many different bulbs use the T10 base. :)
 

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Mike,
You are correct, a larger wattage bulb will not be as bright as it should be.
 

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the same size gallon that I have used since I was a baby in swadling clothes, all in USA gallons.

Also, I don't recall ever seeing a gasoline pump in the Lower 48 states that measured quantities in anything other than US Gallons, every pump has a sticker on it stating that fact.
Growing up in Oregon, there was a time where they recalibrated all the mechanical pumps to liters, because they topped out at 99.9垄 per unit and they didn't want to change the pumps when gas went over $1 a gallon.

My low fuel light starts out dim but gets brighter as the fuel level gets lower. I have yet to run out, so I'm not sure just how bright it will get.
 

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The low fuel light Thermistor is in a small tube about 3/4" long. It has holes in the bottom of the tube. It is in there
so when the fuel sloshes, it does not cool off the thermistor.

Once the gas is below the tube, it drains out the holes in the bottom and the Thermistor warms up.
The gas in your tank is always moving. Its not an on off thing. This is why its dim at first.

When I replaced the Thermistor, I sort of destroyed the top of the tube. I used a plastic straw to keep the Thermistor
from touching ground and so it did not flicker.

I had a 1964 VW beetle that had a mechanical gauge. It was a cable that went from the tank which was in front of the
dash to the gauge. It always was moving.

David
 

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The low fuel light Thermistor is in a small tube about 3/4" long. It has holes in the bottom of the tube. It is in there
so when the fuel sloshes, it does not cool off the thermistor.

Once the gas is below the tube, it drains out the holes in the bottom and the Thermistor warms up.
The gas in your tank is always moving. Its not an on off thing. This is why its dim at first.

When I replaced the Thermistor, I sort of destroyed the top of the tube. I used a plastic straw to keep the Thermistor
from touching ground and so it did not flicker.

I had a 1964 VW beetle that had a mechanical gauge. It was a cable that went from the tank which was in front of the
dash to the gauge. It always was moving.

David
Didn't you love those old bugs. Crazy ideas like gas heaters, air from the spare tire to pressurize the washer fluid. Loved to speed shift my automatic stick shift. Plus if someone asked what you had under the hood, you could say "the spare tire."
 
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