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I'm shopping for another bike (Jap Cruiser) and was wondering if you have to rejet, and, or do something different with the air cleaner if adifferentexhaust system (Cobra's, Jardines, ends or extensions etc.) have been added? Some of the Stealers, Oh! I mean Dealers say you don't, than again I have heard you definetally do have to and it has to be done correct, or the bike won't run right. I know some after market exhausts are added to make the bike louder, while some make them run more efficient (more hp) and louder. Would appreciate some advise or comments on this. Thanks, Lonerider.
 

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Depends on the exhaust and on the initial jetting of the bike. After installing the new mufflers and running the bike for awhile, remove the spark plugs and look at the color. If they are a medium beige-brown color, you're probably okay. If they are very light beige to almost white, you're running too lean and you might want to re-jet a little richer.

You'll certainly want to re-balance the carbs when adding new exhaust - do this before anything else.
 

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It's gonna depend on what changes you do the the exhaust system. If the back pressure is close to the OEM you wouldn't have to do any compensation. If the pipeshave little or no restrictions you may end up a little lean on the carbs since you're going to be pumping more air through the engine with each revolution.Torq-Master ads say their GL1500 pipes don't require rejetting even if you use their headers. Probably going to have to find out after you install new pipes.If it runs good and the engine and plugs don't show signs of overheating, no sweat. If not, then you've got some tweaking to do.
 

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Sorry Marco, I wouldn't have jumped in if I'd seen your post, we must have both been typing at nearly the same time!:waving:
 
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Hey exavid :waving:

Just take your time and give some of the other "Gurus" a chance to prove themselves. :whip:

:leprechaun: :18red: :leprechaun:
 

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exavid wrote:
Sorry Marco, I wouldn't have jumped in if I'd seen your post, we must have both been typing at nearly the same time!:waving:

That's okay Paul, I guess we were writing at the same time. At least we're on the same track.
 

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Redwing. wrote:
Hey exavid :waving:

Just take your time and give some of the other "Gurus" a chance to prove themselves. :whip:

:leprechaun: :18red: :leprechaun:
Can't take my time, I don't know how much I have!
 

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You have to be careful with rejetting when it comes to bikes built in the early-mid 80's. The manufactures' were just cutting their teeth on low emission systems and some strange things were the result. I did some extensive Jettingwork with a Suzuki 750, Honda 650 night hawk and a Couple of GL-1100's. You often find the greatest difference is made when changing the low speed jets. For example the way the carb flowpath is mapped out in the 1100 wings you are not running solely on the main jet until you are running over 5,000RP which is around 80MPH on an 83' I found out the hard way when I removed the stock intake box and tried rejetting the carbs after 3 removals and putting in bigger main jets with no change in my lean condition. I went to the gas analyzer and found out the low speed jets made the most difference.

What the others have said is right on there are so many varibles that without specifics there is no definite answer.
 
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