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Oh - THAT guy...
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That center piece comes out by loosening the bags, removing the license plate and mount, the plastic under the trunk.
 

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My last rear tire change, I was gonna go thru all that. With a friends advice. I removed the left bag, put it on a bike jack up real high and pulled the axle. ( I blocked the front wheel, but jack location turned out I didn't need to compensate for the weight loss)

Once the axle was out I pulled the wheel off the rear end and slid the tire out laying it down as I did. It came right out. It was quick and easy.

That bag lift thing may have another purpose but all that work sure isn't needed for tire removal.
 

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Piaggio MP3, was 02 GL1800
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I can do it even easier than all of the above.

I just fork over a few $$$ and it is all done for me. Meanwhile, I just sit in a chair back in the back and shoot the breeze with the guys who do that for a living.

In and Out in an hour?
no way can I do that.
 

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I found it easier to remove the saddle bags.

BTW Steve, how did you embed the youtube video into your post?
 

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I'd go the extra two top bolts, a few connectors and coax cable for the radio and pull the whole thing off. If that tour pac fell on your head it would hurt. Actually it's pretty easy on a stock bike if you have a helper on and off...plus the bike looks pretty cool with the back all naked. You start adding a hitch and bunch of extra wiring and it begins to suck.

BTW...the guy in the video has a lift with a drop out. I wonder if he knows there's room to get the wheel out the bottem without doing any of that? That's my preferred method.
 

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I've tried both ways, the tip up method only once. There's more chance of doing damage by tipping up the whole back than by removing one saddlebag and twisting the pipes down and out of the way. You have a lot more control moving small parts around and can see exactly what you're doing. No chance of damaging a wire that was misrouted that you didn't notice.
 

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I removed Both bags when I just did mine for the first time. Good time to get in there and clean everything up..... a lot of dirt in there.

I had a $69 Harbor Freight jack that I used, jacked it up, removed bags and exhaust. I left the rear center piece in and the trailer hitch. Once the axle was out, the tired came down and I laid it down as I was pulling it out from the right hand side. Went back in the same way.
 

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If you can lift the bike up far enough to drop the tire, you don't have to remove the bags or the tour pac. Swing the muffs out far enough to get at the axle, back the rear shock mount out just far enough so the caliper bracket clears then deflate the rear tire. Remove axle and spacer. Lift the caliper bracket ass'y just off the rotor and pivot it counterclockwise so the bracket hole that fits over the shock mount sits directly on top of the left axle hole in the swingarm, with the caliper touching the inside of the left saddlebag. Wiggle the rear wheel ass'y off the final drive and you'll just have clearance to slide it out the bottem. Sometimes the caliper/bracket wants to drop from this position when you're disturbing the rear wheel to remove it. Put it back into position or there won't be clearance to uncouple the wheel from the drive unit. Sometimes it helps to have a second person hold the bracket where it is. Works on all models and years.
 

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Thats the exact way i was told to do my '88 1500 by a bike mechanic. He said it was a lot easier than taking the panniers apart.

I never tried doing it any other way. I didn't have a jack or a table lift. I used a couple of car ramps and stuck one under one side at the centre of gravity point and then pushed the bike back and kicked the other one under the other side. worked a treat at the time but use a bike jack now for the '02 1800.
 

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Disfunctional Nimatode
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My last rear tire change, I was gonna go thru all that. With a friends advice. I removed the left bag, put it on a bike jack up real high and pulled the axle. ( I blocked the front wheel, but jack location turned out I didn't need to compensate for the weight loss)

Once the axle was out I pulled the wheel off the rear end and slid the tire out laying it down as I did. It came right out. It was quick and easy.

That bag lift thing may have another purpose but all that work sure isn't needed for tire removal.

This is what you need to do!
 

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Premium Member
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Thats the exact way i was told to do my '88 1500 by a bike mechanic. He said it was a lot easier than taking the panniers apart.

I never tried doing it any other way. I didn't have a jack or a table lift. I used a couple of car ramps and stuck one under one side at the centre of gravity point and then pushed the bike back and kicked the other one under the other side. worked a treat at the time but use a bike jack now for the '02 1800.
My trade also. When 1500's came out in 88, Honda put on a new product school. The procedure they showed us was to remove the tour pac as an ass'y, which isn't really that hard. But it takes quite a little extra time and requires a second person as the pac is rather big and clumsy. My co-worker (at the time) and I were relieved to find the tire could be removed without all that work. Since then, I'm sure I have replaced at least a thousand 1500 rears using the drop down method. Makes it possible to do a set tires in less than 1.5 hours.

On the other hand, it's good Honda designed the pac to come off so easy. If you know how to do it, it's possible to remove a rear tire in a parking lot with very few tools and no jack.
 
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