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I have a 1989 1500 with a sticking back brake. I have read that the rear brake pipes are known to corrode from the inside causing the outer piston to drag-my problem exactly.

Has anyone heard of this and which pipe in particular as there are 4 metal ones. Now the boring winters nearly out of the way, the GL needs to be ready to go!!

Thanks in advance.
 

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You'll probably find that it's sticking pistons. They collect a lot of crud and stick. You will have to pop them out, clean them up with thinners or petrol and refit them preferably with new seals.
 

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Check the bolts holding the caliper, the caliper is supposed to slide on these and being where they are, tend to be neglected and accumulate crud etc. I use never sieze on the bolts, it doesnt rot the rubber dust caps.
Grasp the caliper and you should feel a slight movement side to side.
If your going to do maintanance on the caliper, put new seals and pistons in while it's off. If you don't replace them you will continue having the problem. They don't cost an arm and a leg. I did all three last year $65 CAD or there abouts.

Been there done that....Last year I had the rear caliper off and changed the pads, pushed the cylinders back in...had to do the job about 3 times till I finally did it properly.
 

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Check the pistons and replace if pitted and install new seals. Make sure all the sliding portions of the caliper are lubricated with hi temp synthetic lube and flush the fluid all around. Also, lubricate your brake pedal pivot as this can sometimes keep the brake pedal from returning all the way if it's dirty and dry.

Vic
 

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I just flushed all the brake fluid in my :11grey:. While flushing the front system I saw some pretty big chunks pass through the drain line and I thought OH SH... When I took the bike out for a test run, sure enoughthe front brake was dragging pretty bad. Using compressed air (a lot of it) I took the caliper apart and cleaned the pistons and cylinders. They were pretty gummed up. I didn't have new seals to put in but I needed the bike to go to work on in the morning, so I lubed theseals and pistonsup with brake fluid and carefully put it all back together. Brakes work fine now and no leaks so far. I am keeping an eye out for leaks and half suspecting I will be replacing the seals soonerthan later though.

Bob
 

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As Tricky says, one of the things that get missed is the sliding bolts, you can sort the pistons out and, low and behold, not long after the brakes drag again. push the pistons in then try to move the caliper on the slides, it should move easily.

Take the sliding parts out completely clean them up or replace them then pack the space between the two rubber end grommets(dust caps) with an appropriate anti seize grease.
 

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JOHNO wrote:
As Tricky says, one of the things that get missed is the sliding bolts, you can sort the pistons out and, low and behold, not long after the brakes drag again. push the pistons in then try to move the caliper on the slides, it should move easily.

Take the sliding parts out completely clean them up or replace them then pack the space between the two rubber end grommets(dust caps) with an appropriate anti seize grease.
Johno has that right, just got through doing that to my rear brake caliper. If it's frozen or not moving, it will usually show up in the pads, one will be a lot thicker than the other. The little bushing with the rubber caps was the culprit on mine. I was a bit thick and didn't realize this was the slipping joint at first, couldn't put the caliper back on the wheel after replacing pads. Took awhile but the light dawned. I had to use WD40 and a small ball pein hammer to get the thing loose enough to remove.
 

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You might get away with it. I've often done this and reused old seals and never had problems. Maye be just lucky. AZWinger wrote:
I just flushed all the brake fluid in my :11grey:.  While flushing the front system I saw some pretty big chunks pass through the drain line and I thought OH SH...  When I took the bike out for a test run, sure enough the front brake was dragging pretty bad.  Using compressed air (a lot of it) I took the caliper apart and cleaned the pistons and cylinders.  They were pretty gummed up.  I didn't have new seals to put in but I needed the bike to go to work on in the morning, so I lubed the seals and pistons up with brake fluid and carefully put it all back together.  Brakes work fine now and no leaks so far.  I am keeping an eye out for leaks and half suspecting I will be replacing the seals sooner than later though.

Bob
 

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:waving:Hey, Welcome paramedic, to the forum! Just noticed that was your first post!:waving:

The quickest way to kill the seals is to push the dirty pistons back in.
 

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Over here it's usually gummed up pistons and oxidized calipers that make the brakes seize. The damp weather and the salt used on teh roads in winter is a big factor in this as well.
 
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