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Would shutting the petcock off at the tank and idling the bike til she runs out of gas be as effective as drainging the fuel other ways? I`m talking about for winterization.
 

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I am not sure if that is the proper way to drain the carbs, but it has worked for me for years. I drain the tank first and then run the bike until it stops. I expect there may be a bit of gas remaining in the bottom of the bowls but not enough to be of concern.

Lugnut
 

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I keep the tank and carbs full with a good fuel stabilizer such as seafoam. I've had experience where I parked a car with little gas in it. Due to our climate and condensation, I ended up with a rusted gas tank which caused more problems than I care to deal with again. I've done this with my 82 for 18 years and not a problem.
 

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zonk3939 wrote:
Would shutting the petcock off at the tank and idling the bike til she runs out of gas be as effective as drainging the fuel other ways? I`m talking about for winterization.
Zonk, as Lugnut said it will leave a small amount of fuel in the bottom of each float bowl as the jet pick up doesn't go all the way to the bottom..

Even when draining the carbs completelythere will be some fuel residue & hydrocarbon vapors remaining so the jets can still plug with varnish & gum..

For the last few tanks of fuel MAKE DARN sure there is NO alcohol in the fuel used (alcohol holds water & that can ruin a carb in short order)

Draining the carbs also allows the rubber parts to dry out & they can then sometimes crackwhen theydry out..

Personally I don't drain the carbs but instead use a FRESH tank of gasoline with a good slug of 2 cycle oil added.. The oil lubricates the inside of the carbs & prevents gum formation (for one winter anyhow).. Most good 2 cycle oil also contains a fuel stabilizer to prevent fuel related problems.. At one time I also used Stabil fuel stabilizer but have found the 2 cycle oil works better & causes less start-up problems in the spring..

For longer storage periods on old engines, equipment, tractors, etc I completely drain the fuel systems & fill the carbs with a mixture of 2 cycle oil & mineral spirits.. The mineral spirits doesn't degrade like gasoline does so doesn't form a gummy residue or varnish but like any volatile liquid will evaporate over time so more should be added from time to time..

Also don't store your motorcycle with used motor oil in it as that allows the acid in the oil to etch the crankshaft journals & bearings, it can even etch the cam lobes & lifter bases..

Twisty
 

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Thanks guys..so my best bet is to put some 2 cycle oil in the gas (How Much?) and leave the tank ful over the winter.Thanks again!
 

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Storing the bike over the winter with an empty tank is asking for rust, a full tank with good gas and a stabilizer is much better, keeps oxygen away from the bare steel.
 

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I guess there are several ways to store the bikes for the winter. The reason I store mine with the fuel completely drained is that I store my bike in the basement of my house, I feel safer that way.
I wonder if I still risk getting a rusted fuel tank even with a heated basement?

Lugnut
 

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Since you live in a maritime climate as I do, the risk is there due to the humidity, evey time the barometer changes or the doors are opened in the house the air pressure changes meaning a little air enters or leaves the fuel tank bringing it's load of water vapor. I've used dessicant successfully in some steel containers stored for a couple years. I just put some silica gel in a piece of cloth and put it in the box. It could be done in a fuel tank by making up a slim roll of the stuff in a cloth and lowering it into the tank through the filler neck leaving the tank cap loose to avoid cutting the suspension cord or using aluminum foil to seal off the tank neck.

I'll admit I'm a fanatic on corrosion, many years flying float planes on salt water in SE Alaska does that to you. So It might be overkill. There are also some fuel tank protective products available too.
 

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LugNut .... I also live in a maritime environment/forums/images/emoticons/sad.gif... The easiest way, IMHO , is to go to Canadian Tire, and get a quality fuel stabilizer... full tank of fresh gas, add the  stabilizer, ride it around 10 blocks, or so, and store it in your basement... If you EVER smell gas./forums/images/emoticons/confused.gif.. then your bike needs some o-rings on the shut-off, or a new gas tank cap...  Fuel in a maintained vehicle should be as safe as fuel in a red plastic can... I had a bike with a o-ring on the shutoff problem... and I could smell it in the morning in the garage.... Storing it "dry" is a sure way to get rust in your tank.....                                         BTB.. How do you get a 1000# wing down to your basement/forums/images/emoticons/shock.gif ?? LOL SilverDave /forums/images/emoticons/emoticonsxtra/cooldj.gif
 

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SilverDave wrote:
LugNut .... I also live in a maritime environment/forums/images/emoticons/sad.gif... The easiest way, IMHO , is to go to Canadian Tire, and get a quality fuel stabilizer... full tank of fresh gas, add the stabilizer, ride it around 10 blocks, or so, and store it in your basement...
SilverDave, I think that's the best way to do it too, but wasconcerned about fire safety storing it in the basement with fuel aboard. It would probably be okay if there's no furnace or gas operated appliances in the basement but a fire inspector would probably have a stroke.
 

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Decisions, decicions. I do have a furnace in the basement which was why I was concerned . I also realize how much trouble rust can cause . I am not going to store it for a while, will decide then. All great information.

Thanks to all

P.S. I drove the bike into the basement thruogh the basement doors!!!:waving:
 

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My next door neighbor built a small  5 ft by 10 ft ,  separated  by firewall , doored enclosure to the side of his house, and finished it in stucco to match the rest of house... looks like its always been there... and keeps his ($34000) '04 Harley in there, in the winter ...       Here is a $500 alternate , 'specially if you have light snow, or Heavy rain...                                                               http://www.cycleshell.com/                                                         Silver /forums/images/emoticons/emoticonsxtra/cooldj.gif
 

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With my old 750 I use to dry the tank and thenspray a coat of WD40 on the inside of the tank, kept it from rusting. Had a little smoke in the spring but nothing bad.
 

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exavid wrote:
Storing the bike over the winter with an empty tank is asking for rust, a full tank with good gas and a stabilizer is much better, keeps oxygen away from the bare steel.
Paul... didn't we just talk about this a couple of weeks ago? or maybe it is that CRS thing I have going again:gunhead:
 

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Yep we did. Many of us. However if everybody just did a search and found the info their looking for the live part of this board might become rather moribund and that woudn't be good. So everyone keep those cards and letters coming.:goofygrin:
 

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Lugnut wrote:
Decisions, decicions. I do have a furnace in the basement which was why I was concerned . I also realize how much trouble rust can cause . I am not going to store it for a while, will decide then. All great information.

Thanks to all

P.S. I drove the bike into the basement thruogh the basement doors!!!:waving:
no way would I store the bike with fuel in a basement with a furnace, by the time you smell it it might be too late. those gasoline fumes travel along the floor they could easily reach a source of ignition befoe you smell fumes.
 

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Since I live in northern Illinois, an area which has it's share of temperature fluctuations dipping down to sub-zero and a day later above freezing, controlling the effects of condensation has been a real challenge. A winter storage solution which has served me well for several years is to store my Wing in my shed in a moisture-proof bag purchased at http://www.shelterking.com I purchased five one pound sacks of re-usable dessicant at an army surplus store and, after drying them out in my oven (30 minutes @ 200 degrees), toss them in the "bag" just before I close it up for the winter. My logic is this........it doesn't matter if the temp of the bike varies from day to day or even day to night, if the dessicant eliminates moisture or humidity in the sealed bag, there can be no condensation. The bag seals out moisture, dust and critters.  The whole solution was accomplished with a price tag of under $165.00
 

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Sounds like a great solution, the Navy does much the same thing with mothballed ships, the idea is to keep the humidity down, if it's low enough there's no corrosion.
 
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