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Has anyone every tryed to drill there rotors if so whats needed and how is it done?
 

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Done it on a CX500 years back. You need a pillar drill at low speed (the rotors/discs are cast iron), using a Black & Decker at 3000 rpm won't do, too much heat and also the drill bits wear out much faster. Start with a small drill bit first. Before you do anything make sure you mark the holes in a regular pattern around the disc so it won't be off balance.
When the holes are drilled, if you use a larger drill bit just to put a small chamfer or bevel in the edge of the holes to take the sharp lip off. That makes the brake pads last longer.
 

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Give instructions to a reputable shop? Unless you have a good drill press and are quite sure of not messing them up, I would source out this project.

I am also interested in having this done, so if you do end up trying it, I would like to know how you do it!
 

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wingwarrior wrote:
Has anyone every tryed to drill there rotors if so whats needed and how is it done?
Wingwarrior, I haven't ever drilled motorcycle brake rotors but have drilled some automotive rotors.

Probably the easiest way is to draw up a pattern you like on the computer (draw to scale or size accordingly) , then cut out & tape that drawing to the side of your brake rotor, then center punch all the hole locations, then use a drill press & drill the holes to size, then use a chamfer bit & chamfer the holes to be recessed enough to not allow sharp corners to contact the brake pads.

Before making the drawing, look closely at the bike's rotor to get an idea of where the internalcooling fins run as you really don't want to drill through them as that weakens the rotor & can allow heat related warpage.

I haveused both a cobalt & a carbide drill bit & found the carbide best but a lot more expensive. The cobalt works great if you keep it WELL lubricated with cutting oil. When all done justuse a DA sander or sand paper on a block & hit the sides of the rotors to remove any small burrs & raised places around the holes that could tear up the brake pads.I have drilled both straight lines of holes & curved lines of holes & find the curved lines of holes to be slightly quieter. While I haven't ever done it myself I see a lot or rotors using a random holes patternnow (probably to keep the harmonics down).

Twisty
 
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