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I have a noticeable slack in the drive line of my '83 1100I.

The first thing I want to check is the condition of the rubber cush drive. Can anyone tell me exactly where this is. Is it part of the rear wheel or the differential drive?



Thanks,

Gilbert
 

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When i last saw it it was inside the rear wheel:)a drive flange with pins on it locates in the rubber bushes that in turn locates in the bevel geardrive housing, well it does on a 1200 i presume they are similar!. Yours Malc
 

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Hello Gilbert. Malc is right about the rubbers and bushes. They wear out and cause slop. It's the first thing you need to check anyway when looking at this type of problem. :D
 
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Hey GilbertGL :waving: Your very welcome aboard the best Goldwing Site on the net. :clapper: These guys will soon have all your problems sorted. Ride Safe. :jumper:

:leprechaun: :18red: :leprechaun:
 

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Greetings Gilbert. Don't forget to check the condition of the UJ under the rubber boot at the engine end. They can wear and develop lots of loose play.
 

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You had better hope that the rubber dampers aren't wore out because I've spent considerable time trying tobuy them to no avail. My Honda dealer didn't show anything on his parts fiche. I've also looked at several aftermarket parts places with no luck. :(

I've also asked for the parts numbers on this and other Wing BBS and have been told that the dampers are considered part of the rear wheel. If anyone reads this and has the proper numbers or where you can buy them, it would be much appreciated if you would post that info.

Regards,

Hobie
 

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Thanks for your help guys. I have about 2" to 3" of free movement at the rear wheel. Do you think this is too much?

I guess the problem MAY not be the dampers. If it is the UV joint, would you recommend dismantling the swingarm to replace it, or should I just live with it?

Thanks again,

Gilbert
 

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Two to three inches of freeplay at the tire tread doesn't sound excessive to me. Sounds pretty typical.

:waving:
 

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GilbertGL wrote:
I have about 2" to 3" of free movement at the rear wheel. Do you think this is too much?

I guess the problem MAY not be the dampers. If it is the UV joint, would you recommend dismantling the swingarm to replace it, or should I just live with it?
As Exavid said "2" to 3" of free movement at the rear wheel" isn't too bad, & when you take into account that you are feeling not only the drive dampeners, but also the drive collar splines, u-joint, drive shaft splines, ring & pinion free play, & trans gear free play "2" to 3" of free movement is pretty darn good..



On your question:

would you recommend dismantling the swingarm to replace it, or should I just live with it?
I'm not of the opinion that you have a u-joint problem but would recommend you at least pull your final drive & use a 60%-65% moly grease on your drive shaft splines & rear drive collar splines to prolong their life & prevent any future problems in that area..



JDC
 

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2-3" depends on what part of the wheel, if its on the tread face, thats normal. The error is multiplied by the wheel radius. There has to be slop or parts start breaking. Check the U-eys by parking it on the side stand in Neutral, loosening the driveshaft boot and trying to turn the shaft. Then cuss up a storm trying to get that garter spring back on:X

Dont see any reason the wheel dampers couldnt be made, they were made in the first place.
 

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yeah. Maybe epoxy them in or have a machinist turn some down on a lathe. Some hard rubber that is grease and oil resistant would do the trick. If it doesnt work youre not out much.
 

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I was informed by a reputable Honda distributor, that the bushings were considered part of the rear wheel. So, if you need to replace them you're going to have to find an aftermarket custom replacement or buy a new wheel:shock:.

I've had no other luck searching for them.:gunhead:



hobie
 
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