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Pwhoever
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My rear wheel has a badly grooved rotor and I was able to find a practically new rear wheel with an almost unused rear rotor from a trike conversion for a bargain price. I decided to change out my cruddy rear wheel for this shiny one and I am going to have the tire swapped over to it because it has plenty of miles left on it. When I took the old wheel off, the driven flange was a bear to get off. I can't recall from previous removals if I had this problem but I don't think I did. I always put fresh Honda Moly 60 paste on the splines whenever I change the rear tire or pull it off. I know on my 97that the driven flange has the five pins and I am not supposed to grease those pins so I don't. After finally getting the driven flange off the rear wheel, I noticed that there was light corrosion on several of the pins. Also the rubber dampers inside the wheel were pretty mushy allowing a lot of free play with the collars. On the new wheel, the rubber dampers are nice and firm with very little free play in the collars.

Would it be ok to lightly sand the pins to remove the corrosion or should I be looking at getting a replacement driven flange? The splines look ok, it is the corrosion on the pins that I am concerned about. If it is ok to sand them, is there a way to prevent the corrosion from coming back?
 

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not a 1500 but on my 1200 I used solvent to clean them up really well and then took and cleaned the pockets on the wheel really well also. If you do change driven flanges it is my understanding that you need to keep the flange and final drive mated due to wear patterns. I could be wrong but this is how I understand it.

Ride Safe, Ray:waving:
 

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The book says to make sure the pins and the collars are clean. That said, if it were mine, I wouldn't have a problem using some fine emery cloth to clean up the corrosion. Not sure if it's a good idea to coat them with anything to avoid the corrosion returning. I would make sure I checked it, every time I replaced the rear tire. As long as the rubber dampers were in good shape, I wouldn't worry too much.

I have a couple drive flanges laying around and one of them has some corrosion on it. I don't think it's a big deal.

Ever ride in the fall or spring with road salt residue left on the roads?

Be nosy to see some other opinions.
 

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Ray, I didn't even think about the final drive being mated but that makes perfect sense. Thanks

Mike, the rubber dampers and collars on the "new" wheel are immaculate so I have that going for me. And since you mentioned it, I actually ride year round. I have some Gerbing heated clothing so I don't worry about the cold, just the snow. But I am pretty sure that the road salt which is normally very liberally spread here in Chicago except for this last winter, helped to do a number on the finish on my old rear wheel. Since my garage isn't heated, my bike unfortunately gets neglected until it warms up enough in the spring to clean it up.
 

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I would also check the swing arm bearings, if your wheel was that messed up. I don't mind the cold either. Road salt is the main reason, my bike waits until we get a few good hard rain showers, to clean the road.
 

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Clean up the pins with 600 or 800 grit wet or dry paper and put it back together. As long as there's no serious slop between the pins and the aluminum blocks it'll be fine. The aluminum blocks don't fit real snug to start with.
 

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Well I got the tire swapped over to the "new" rim today. I was tied up most of the day today so I didn't get a chance to put it back together. I am going to tackle it tomorrow hopefully. I will take a look at the swingarm then and sandpaper the pins. Thank you both for the advice.
 
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