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i do the work then decide to sit down and ask the question's, i installed a set of driving light's today
i hooked them up so when i turn the bike on the light's come on is that the way they should have i hooked them up to a switch?
and i shopped around for a carb snyc tool today found one at 139.00 canadian dollar's at a local bike shop is this a good price or should i shop some more, bike is completed need to snyc my carb's
and run some seafoam through .


derek:
 

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My advice on this one would be to wire your driving lights via a switch and a realy, the reason being twofold. 1/ The lamps being wired via a relay with the relay being powered by your existing electrics only when the ignition is onand the lamps from your battery with an inline fuse will protect your bikes wiring harness. 2/ A switch will isolate the driving lights independantly in the event of any problems with your lighting circuit or your driving light circuit, also it's just a legal issue over here in the UK. If your going to be wiring in other electrical bits and pieces I would suggest that you wire in a complete independantly fused spurred relay, again this protects your existing wiring harness. But keep an eye on the demand your putting on your alternator and battery as they can only take so much!! Hope this helps.
 

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As to synch tool..I use two Harbor frt gauges $20 total..some 1/4" tubing and a couple of aquarium air valves total $25. make it four gauges for $45..total..works for me. And adapters for $10 that's it..

http://search.harborfreight.com/cpisearch/web/search.do?keyword=vacuum+guage&Submit=Go

http://www.casporttouring.com/store/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=CST&Category_Code=TWINM

You can buy the gauges on line and adapters

Most accurate and cheapest..but harder to use as they can suck the fluid up into the cylinders..are these $4 to make.. I added the aquarium valves to slow that down.


http://www.powerchutes.com/manometer.asp
 

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I'm partial to the Motion Pro SyncPro carb tool.

It's a little tricky to set up, but once you learn it - it's cool.
 

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Put the lights on a switch & put a fuse in the circuit. Don't need a relay as the on & off switch will certainly handle any amp draw the lights will have. A relay in a driving light circuit has no purpose that I can think of.

Explanantion: Relay's are normally used to protect sensitive & expensive switches like the fan thermo switch. The relay lets you run a 1 amp circuit to the switch & 10/20/30 amps to the item needing the power. When the relay is triggered ( by water temp in the case of thermo switch ) it will turn the fan on and off as needed. In your case the toggle switch is your relay. I don't know how you'd go about wiring a relay into a light circuit, but it might be a good idea to wire the light so that if you forget to turn toggle switch off, the lights will go off when you shut the engine off. That's the way factory driving iights work on a car/truck.

A Morgan carbtune is a good one to get for adjusting the carbs. Has rods inside the tubes instead of mercury. Over the years I've used both the mercury style & the carbtune and prefer the carbtune. Much safer with no mercury. Do a search on the site I've seen others commenting on a price drop of this item, but with our low dollar might not be any cheaper.
 

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Carbtune for the syncs, just got a set from Ireland, took just over a week, and they didnt add GST or PST, it just came in air mail.
Seem a fairly well made tool I bought the pouch too.
Price came in at $120.23 C$

A relay for the driving lights. Be carefull you dont flatten the battery with the driving lights, if the 1000 is anything like the 1200 it wont produce enough power to runn the driving lights for too long.
 

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Years ago I wired up some driving light on my GL1000. I liked the way Honda had the front turn signals double as marker lights while the headlight was in low beam so I did the same with the driving lights. In low beam default the driving came on and if I switched to high beam they turned off.
 

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Yes Derek, regarding your driving lights, make sure the switch can carry the draw from the lights. I burned out a couple of switches because they did not have the voltage or amps large enough for the driving lights draw. So I went to an auto performance store and got them there cheaper than the mechanic charged me for them. I think you know about the place called Zdeno's. Keep us up to date. :waving:
 

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In Tricky's diagram, I would put an illuminated toggleswitch(available at Princess Auto)between the relay and the lights(off of the relay's #87 post)

That way, you control the lights and not the relay in which you might want to have future additional electrical devices/components(aux 12v outlet)controlled by the relay.

Make sure your stator can handle the additional electrical draw.


Dusty
 

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i'm running the regular tail light's signal's the head light, two small light's under the rad on the chrome plate that cover's oil filter etc. and now two driving light's

thank's tricky. should i go buy a relay orrun a wire direct back to the one by the battery?
 

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Dusty Boots wrote:
In Tricky's diagram, I would put an illuminated toggleswitch(available at Princess Auto)between the relay and the lights(off of the relay's #87 post)

That way, you control the lights and not the relay in which you might want to have future additional electrical devices/components(aux 12v outlet)controlled by the relay.

Make sure your stator can handle the additional electrical draw.


Dusty
That would negate the use of having a relay in the system at all. The idea is to take the load OFF a switch and place it on a relay.

Why bother with the relay?
 

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Dusty Boots wrote:
In Tricky's diagram, I would put an illuminated toggle switch(available at Princess Auto) between the relay and the lights(off of the relay's #87 post)

That way, you control the lights and not the relay in which you might want to have future additional electrical devices/components(aux 12v outlet) controlled by the relay.

Make sure your stator can handle the additional electrical draw.

i'm a liitle concerned about that but i've seen goldwing's with a lot more light's then i got on mine.....
 

Dusty
 

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Hi DRking,



The switched relay is the way to go to protect your existing electrical system.



As for wings with lots of lights!! Yes your correct I too have seen some wings with numerous lights front, back, side, above and below!! I have also seen some wings with overloaded electrical systems with burned out alternators, wiring and switches!!



At the end of the day your bikes electrical system was designed to safely handle a certain amount of draw on the electrical system, if you add extra draw to circuits that are not designed to handle the drawswitches, connections and wiring start to get all hot and bothered and one day let you down or worse start a fire.



people have different ways to solve different problems and for the last 30 years if I have added an electrical addition to any motor vehicle I have made a seperate circuit and powered the item up via a switched relay, I have never had a burned out switch orproblem in any way.



Good luck
 

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drking wrote:
i'm running the regular tail light's signal's the head light, two small light's under the rad on the chrome plate that cover's oil filter etc. and now two driving light's

thank's tricky. should i go buy a relay orrun a wire direct back to the one by the battery?
This is the way I have mine wired. A relay for each add on. Mind you I do have the external alternator so I have no concerns about draining the battery.
I would put 35 Watt bulbs in the driving lights, and change any lamps to LED's this will cut down on the draw.
 

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I'm still a supporter of the KISS principle. No advantage to putting a relay in a running light circuit. A fuse protects the electrical circuits of the bike, the relay protects the switch not the electrical circuit of the bike. Most relays are rated for up to 30 amps & and it is the strenght of fuse (ie: 5/10/20 amps) that you put in that circuit that controls how much amp will be allowed to be pulled by the device. Too much amps fuse blows.

As others have said as long as switch will handle the amp draw of the lights then you shouldn't have any problems.

Wheither your alternator will handle the load is another question. These bikes where not designed for much other than stock equipment.ie: headlights on, fan on & ignition. I'm pretty sure if you put two additional driving lights into the electrical load it will overtax the alternator. You'll get away with it for awhile but sooner or later it will cost you.
 

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References where an interesting read.

Prety clear that the standard electrical system on the GL1000 or GL1100 would have some difficulty running these additional lights. No doubt the LED's cut down on the power being used if your using signal lights, brake lights or tail light, but wouldn't help with the head light. Might be a real balancing act.

I think you said your battery was indicating 12.4 Volts or something similar when the bike is running @1800 RPM with all the lights on. A normal stator/alternator like on my bike with the headlight on , bike running at higher speed ( and no additonal loads on ) puts out about 15.4 V to the battery. This is normal and indicates a good stator. If yours is running a less than this it will eventually drain the battery down. The lower volt reading at the battery would indicate to me that the electrical system is having trouble keeping up with the demand placed on it.

Or maybe I'm read it wrong.
 
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