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Hi all-
This write up covers my experience with installing the Dupli-Tech version of an aftermarket alternator conversion kit for those who choose not to replace a failed stator. I believe that these kits will only gain in popularity, and the more that’s written about them the better.
I chose the DT kit because I liked the way the alternator installed on the newly milled timing belt cover, there was no modifying other parts of the bike, and it ran off of the crankshaft as opposed to the cam.
It is a bit pricey at nearly $600; I would hope the price drops as more people order it.
My bike is a 1987 Interstate, and nearly all of the observations I’ll list relate to that bike. The only exceptions will pertain to my friend 2slim’s 84 model, on which he had already installed the conversion. Donn was an invaluable asset in the installation of the kit on my bike; I owe him a lot.
Ok, on to the installation!
With your kit you’ll receive installation instructions. I will amend certain portions of those instructions as they applied to my situation.
Shorten right timing belt cover per photo below. While precision is not required, the instructions will tell you that the cut must break into the hole to clear the newly installed pulley on the crankshaft. I ended up grinding the cut around the hole further back; it was just too close to the pulley-and belt- for comfort. I would recommend cutting out a full 2/3 of the hole initially; there’s plenty of overlap from the new cover. A hacksaw works fine. This picture shows where I made the original cut.



And here you see how close the right tb cover is to the alternator belt, even after I ground back my original cut:


I also had to modify the new cover in 2 ways. First, I ground back the boss (I would call it a flange) on the inside of the center hole- it is also too close to the pulley and tended to catch the outer part of the belt when I tried to install it, even though it has a half-moon cut out already. Here you can see where that flange was pushing against the belt, and how I ground it back.




The other mod I had to do was cut a notch out to allow for the pickup coil wires clearance into the timing belt area. This is not needed on an 84 model because the wires are located at the rear of the engine. Trust me, though- if you crimp those wires during installation, the bike will definitely not run well! Donn had to grind a slight dip into an adaptor piece to allow clearance for a water outlet on his 84. Here's the notch:



When it comes time to install the new cover, it is necessary to remove all nuts that hold on the left side crash bar. The new timing belt cover is simply too long to install otherwise. You don’t have to remove the crash bar, just let it pivot downward out of the way.
Important! As you begin to position the cover into place, do not secure it! If you do the crash bar will not clear the cover and you won’t be able to get it back in place. Get the cover close to position and swing the crash bar back up over it; then you can secure the cover.
When installing the alternator onto the tb cover, I fashioned a “hook” out of a short length (4 or 5 inches) of metal clothes hanger to assist in getting the belt onto the alternator pulley. (The belt itself is inside the tb cover.)
The radiator extension bolts are necessary for the radiator to clear the cover, but it makes replacing the lower radiator hose not a lot of fun. The NAPA part number for the hose is 8101- you have to cut some off of each end- and for me it was a chore. Donn had no trouble, though. I also found that the extension bolts threw the bottom of the radiator out far enough to prevent the attachment of the lower piece that attaches to both lower fairings. For me, that was not a big deal- it may be to you. I believe that piece could be attached with some trimming. The next two photos show what I mean:



Wiring is not difficult, but remember this: the charging indicator lamp that comes with the kit only lights up when the key is initially turned on- it will go out when the engine is started. That first light up just shows that the system is hooked up and operating correctly. And I’ll tell ya that a multitester showing a battery being charged is a beautiful thing!
All in all, this was a difficult install for me. I put on and took off the new timing belt cover half a dozen times. Knowing the necessary modifications would have helped immensely. You should just be able to hold the cover in place once to verify whether these mods are needed for your bike. Good luck- and I'll be happy to help in any way I can. Here is the end result:

Website: http://www.dupli-tech.com/goldwing-alternator-convertor.html
 

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thanks for the info, but when my alternator fails ill go for poorboys kit as i dont believe that two 6mm bolts will hold the alternator and cover for a long time.

keep us up to date about how it performs in the battleground :)
 

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I will surely keep everyone informed as to how it performs. You bring up an interesting point though, William. I wonder if I should run a small brace from the top bolt of the alternator to the frame. Hmmm...
 

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Don't think I want my alternator sticking out front where it can be struck.
 

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Wolfy, thanks for the detailed write-up. I had seen the webpage for that conversion, but wondered if they were still in business (that page has been up for at least 2 1/2 years). Yours is the first one that I am aware of that was done (other than the one on the webpage, obviously).

Is the alternator that came with the kit a special one or is it one that can be purchased for a car? Just curious.

It is interesting to see a different approach than the poorboy.

Keep us informed as to how it works out.
 

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Hey Paul-
The alternator is for a Mitsubishi, I believe. At any rate, it is a standard auto alternator. I'd like to see in person the poor boy setup, just to compare. I understand the costs involved in milling the new timing belt cover, but $600 is still a bit steep, imho. But I AM up and running!! And that, my friend, is one fine feeling!
 

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:waving:I installed the Dupli-Tech system on my 1984 Interstate last year and had no problems with it. The new left side cover is machined out of a solid piece of billet aluminum and is much more solid than the original piece. Nothing has loosened up since installation. I removed the kit to remove my engine last month.:gunhead:
 

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That is a real Eye sore with that alternator stick ing out were you can see it.

I have the Poorboy Alternator conversion, it is concealed under the left side cover, you dont know its there, unless you look into the shark vents yu may be albe to see it if you look close.

My 2 cents

Westgl
 

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I don't think I like the one in these pics above, just looks weird. I seen a bike with the poorboy kit, looks much better in my opinion. What does the poorboy kit cost and will it fit on a 1100 Interstate?
 

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You Can buy the Poor Boykit from Don Piggot

His E-mail: [email protected]

I thinkthe kitwas $175.00 for his kit, Then you need a Alternator, I used a Alternator. e-mail Don for a current quote.

Nippon Denso 50 amp Alternator w/ internal voltage regulator for a

"1993 Geo Metro". Alternator puts out about 14.3 volts at 1500rpm(my originalGenerator put 14.3volts at 2500rpm)Generator put out at a higher rpm in compared to Alternators. Can be rebuilt with new brushes for about $20.00.

I think the Alternator from Napa was about $180.00 + core charge $50.00 so figure around $250.00 this inclues the little bit of wire you have to buy to wire direct to the battery, and a belt to drive the alternator. I also put a real small digital LED volt gauge this is optional $25.00

so about $425.00 I think my Napa dealer gave me a bit of a discount. You have to explain to him that you are converting your bike to all Napa repair and maintenance parts. they may give you a discount like they did me.

Westgl
 

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Thanks for the info westgl. Will that give me more power to run extra lights? I put light racks on back of my bike and two small driving lights on front but hooked them up to switchs so I can turn them on and off as I want.
 

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Yes, you should be able to.

What wattages did you add/change?

Original is 360watt for a 1986 GL1200-Interstate.

I put a brighter headlight, 4 additional running lights 2 each side front and rear on mine. Two extra tail lights. Then I put two extra 55watt driving lights, you can see that just the extra driving lights alone is 110watts additional. It is easy to use up that original 360watts fast.

To figure your new wattage take your Voltage x Amps

Mine is 14.3volts x 50Amps =715 watts

Not to bad, just about doubled my wattage from stock, another plus is that the voltage is made at a lower rpm of only 1500 rpm (2500rpm for 14.3volts with stock)

NICE ! ! ! ! :D

For me this conversion is a must have, that and the Spin-on Oil filter adaptor from randakk

Westgl
 

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Glad to see others have used the DT Alternator kit also. I installed the kit over the last couple weekends on an 86 Aspencade, and although the instructions are a little vague was able to get the kit fully installed and the bike running. The guys from DT were very helpful with a couple calls I made to them. And I am in no way a mechanic. I could do it from scratch again in a couple hours.

I am having trouble with the timimg. I have the crankshaft in the lined up position "T" straight on its mark, and both camshaft pulleys in the straight up position. The bike starts but will not even idle, plus alot of backfiring.

Any ideas or pointers anyone could give me. In the process of putting the kit on, I had to flip the right side cam pulley as it was on 'backwards', this allowed the new alternator pulley to fit into the keyway. This made me have to remove that belt and reinstall. Does that belt have to go on a certain way? No one locally will look at it for less than $200. I am in Northern Cal, any one know someone who knows enough to just set the timimg outside of a shop?
 

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It is interesting to read the comments here. I am glad there are choices
when is comes to conversion kits. I chose the Dupli-Tech kit over the Poor Boy simply because the major moving parts are encased rather then in the open so to speak. Now I'm not posting this to degrade one sytem or the other. But just to give you my thought process in selecting the Dupli-Tech over the Poor Boy. Both systems have their good points and their downsides. Both have compromises, but both are way better then the poorly designed factory system.

The alternator on my Dupli-tech install does not stick out any further the radiator, well maybe a 1/2 inch or so. Granted, I will not win any "best of show" with the bikes that I have installed the kit on (two 84I's). I won't be entering any shows anyway. I just want to ride.

To some, the cost and the alternator location are the downsides of the DT system. You make a good point and I fully respect your opinion. A third area is the exposure of the back side of the alternator. The cost and location doesn't concern me as much as the exposure to the elements. I am working on a design for a protective sheild, as it were, to reduce the exposure. We'll see how it goes.

As for the Poor Boy....It is a great system also. But as you think the design through, you will see the compromises. I will leave that to you. This is not a criticism, just an observation.

Bottom line....both are excellant attempts at circumventing a factory flaw in order to keep us ridin' and a smile on our faces.

Peace!
 

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Guys. I wonder if your -comment would change if that unit was a supercharger instead of an altenator. We have all seen and heard the phrase " to each his own". Well I think that fits here. I think that idea is a good one but like so many I prefer Don's. And that is what I have got.:clapper::clapper::clapper::clapper::clapper::clapper::cooldevil::cooldevil::cooldevil:
 

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I now have about 1500 miles on the bike since the install, and no problems.
Just keeping y'all up to date!
 
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