Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

I just went out and performed a small experiment on my 84 Aspy. I have the volt gauge in the upper right hand fairing and with the engine running at an idle, the gauge was showing 14.1v.

I hooked my Fluke across the + & - terminals on my battery and the reading on the meter was 14.67v. I then hooked my fluke across the accessory terminal at the top of the fuse box. I got the 14.1v. that the guage was showing.

I am assuming that the Fluke hooked across the battery is a more true reading of my system output rather that what the guage shows.

Is my suspicions correct?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,491 Posts
imported post

csanders67217 wrote:
I just went out and performed a small experiment on my 84 Aspy. I have the volt gauge in the upper right hand fairing and with the engine running at an idle, the gauge was showing 14.1v.

I hooked my Fluke across the + & - terminals on my battery and the reading on the meter was 14.67v. I then hooked my fluke across the accessory terminal at the top of the fuse box. I got the 14.1v. that the guage was showing.

I am assuming that the Fluke hooked across the battery is a more true reading of my system output rather that what the guage shows.

Is my suspicions correct?
Chris, your assumption is correct. The voltmeter hooked up near the fuse box/ign switch measures the voltage after the voltage drop in the wire connections, ign switch, & long wire runs.

On my personal 1200 I have the voltmeter hooked directly to the battery terminals with a fused wire & a micro relay operated by the fuse box accessory terminals. It shows a much truer reading that way. I really don't care what my system voltage is I care what my battery voltage is as that is what starts it next time.

Twisty
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
580 Posts
imported post

There will be a small amount of difference due to resistance of the wire to the accessory terminal and resistance from ground connections. Theoretically, the readings should be the same. You are losing some power. The power to your accessory terminal goes through several connectors and your ignition switch before it gets to your terminal and accessories. This situation can be improved in several ways. The use of relays, heavier wiring and clean grounds can noticeably brighten your lighting andallow accessories toget the power they need. See the thread "Brighter Taillight Bulb". There may be some ideas that you can use.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
imported post

Thanks twisty. I am planning on running a wire from the volt gauge to the battery via a relay as you suggested. I, like you want to know the voltage at the battery, not the system voltage.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,491 Posts
imported post

csanders67217 wrote:
Thanks twisty. I am planning on running a wire from the volt gauge to the battery via a relay as you suggested. I, like you want to know the voltage at the battery, not the system voltage.
Chris, run 2 wires (one + & one -), that way you won't have any voltage loss & will get a true reading.

Don't just run un-sheaved wires as that is just asking for a short, or cut wire, fuse the (+) wire close to the battery (1.5 amp fuse) then run the wires in that black convoluted wire covering, that way no future surprises.

Twisty
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
imported post

Thanks once again twisty. Your advice is appreciated. I will be doing it as you have described. I will post my results once complete.
 

·
Senior Guru
Joined
·
3,589 Posts
imported post

The lads are all correct here. Why Honda didn'tconnect the gauge to the battery in the first place is a mystery. :baffled:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,191 Posts
imported post

/forums/images/emoticons/big_grin.gif  If you want the truest voltage.. the meter , (or idiot light) should be hooked up to the battery directly... but you want it to go off when key is out.. hence a switched , relayed  connection.. Relay powered by the acc panel, and large gauge clean  connections to the battery terminal ... my !!!.. what a hassel to just get this extra .8 volt on the voltmeter../forums/images/emoticons/confused.gif... and remember .. Voltmeters take almost no current  to operate.. But wait../forums/images/emoticons/mad.gifIf you have allready installed an Electrical connection harness.. It uses a relayed,  12 ga fused line to power the coils, which is turned off when key is out.. so I tapped my voltmeter into the "hot" output  of the relay from the EC harness.. and with only 10 minutes of work.. got an almost " true" reading at the voltmeter.Be sure to tape, or shrink wrap  any connection  carefully. /forums/images/emoticons/big_grin.gif SilverDave (agh /forums/images/emoticons/sad.gif... I clearly do NOT understand the font  or paragraph controls here.. sorry .../forums/images/emoticons/tongue.gif  )
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,491 Posts
imported post

GWNorman wrote:
The lads are all correct here. Why Honda didn'tconnect the gauge to the battery in the first place is a mystery.
GWNorman, that would take an extra relay, extra circuit, & an added fuse. Most OEM voltmeters aren't all that accurate anyhow & are just close on present operating voltage. I doubt Honda knew they would have all those stator problems so there wasn't a need at the time to closely monitor the charging voltage at the battery. Even today, most automobiles wire the voltmeter into the electrical system after the ignition switch so it is controlled by the key switch.

Twisty
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top