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looking to purchase a tire repair kit to keep on the bike. I see there's a lot of types. does anyone carry them and has anyone used it for a emergency? looking at the ones that come with co2 so you can plug the tire and then fill it with air. I think it would be a good idea to carry one of these kits. thanks :)
 

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I have carried rope-plugs (licorice style), rubber cement, a reamer and insertion tool as a staple for, well always. The air inflation tool has changed over the years. Carried small handpumps, sparkplug inflators and small 12v air compressors.
Yes, I have used all of them over the years on my bikes as well as others in need.
 

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Since the 'Wing has an on-board air pump, I have the accessory hose so I can use it. I picked up a tire repair kit that includes a reamer, several plugs, etc. I have carried it ever since losing that tire up in Montana on Beartooth pass.
 

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Growing up a neighbor had this type of tire plug kit. It worked well on most any tire. I also plan on buying this one for the Wing also to have just in case. Here is the website that has all kinds of tire repair equipt. I am gonna buy the standard model as the wings have an onboard compressor. There are models that come with the liitle CO2 cartriges. Here is the website, take a look around and hope this can help you or someone else out down the road.
http://www.stopngo.com/categories/Tire-Pluggers/
 

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I think the CO2 types are a waste of money. You need a cartridge of CO2 about every time you use it, may take more than one for some tires. Those ain't all that cheap.
I just carry a 12V compressor, about $15 one as I don't like the tiny $10 one.
As long as you have 12V power you never have to worry about being out of air and it's always free once you buy the compressor. Plus you can use it on anything that needs air. I use them on car and truck tires also, would take lot's of CO2 cartriges as much as I use my little 12V compressor.
I don't like using the bikes compressor other than for shock, I figure no need to wear it out, would be more expensive to replace or rebuild the bikes compressor than buy a new $15 12v one if I ever burn it up.
I have a couple times plugged and aired up flat tires for people on their cars also when they were stranded.

The rope type plugs work well for me. I have the kit but never really use the reamer. If the hole is too small to force in the plug I'll use the reamer to make the hole larger, but only then. If the plug can be forced in the hole I do not use the reamer, I want that hole tight on plug. I have seen people use the reamer like a saw, and that's what they do, they saw a larger hole in the tire, then they wonder why a plug did not work well. They make a small hole into a large hole then put in a small plug! LOL
 

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Am headed out tomoroe for Nova Scotia from Vancover ..After looking at at the tire fix options I bought the slime 12 volt pump and a Dynaplug kit ..with them you do not need a reamer .. Bought from wingstuff
 

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Considering how often a flat occurs (I have had one in 20 years and about 200k miles on the bikes), it seems wearing out the pump is a non-issue. But I agree with the CO2 things- a tire the size on the bike will take more than one. Some of those 12v compressors are very small so storage is not too bad, and on a trip it may have other uses (air mattress, etc).
 

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I also carry a 1 inch wide tie down strap with a ratchet.. If you lose the bead you can strap the center of the tire to help set the bead...... Also getting your bike on the center stand with a flat tire is a bitch......
 

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Considering how often a flat occurs (I have had one in 20 years and about 200k miles on the bikes), it seems wearing out the pump is a non-issue. But I agree with the CO2 things- a tire the size on the bike will take more than one. Some of those 12v compressors are very small so storage is not too bad, and on a trip it may have other uses (air mattress, etc).
I've averaged a couple of flats a year over the past 35 years. Yes, that is a lot of flats. That's why I refuse to ride a bike with tube type tires and no centerstand. Have a flat on one of those and you are just SOL. I carry the sticky rope type of repair kit, and also a couple bottles of Ride-On on trips. I also carry a 12V compressor or a hand pump. I have plugged a few tires that for some reason or another didn't quite seal, even though the plug was glued in there good. The Ride-On finished sealing it. And I definitely want an unlimited supply of air. I have ridden hundreds of miles with a slow leak, stopping every 50 miles or so to add air. You need to have a way to get you home, or at least somewhere that can fix the problem right.

The tie down strap is also a good idea. I used to just use a piece of nylon rope with a screwdriver to tighten it down. After getting a quad, which I know longer have, I had several ratchet tie downs to hold things on that, and they were great bead seaters on those wide tires.

My GW centerstand is almost a ride off stand since I put the 416 air shocks on the back. It is super easy to put it on the stand with air in the tires. The stand and both tires all touch the ground at the same time. It might not be easy, but I'm fairly certain I could get it on the stand with a flat rear tire. I've already had a flat front tire. I plugged it, so far so good.
 

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Wow, that's allot of flats for on a bike. Sounds like my jeep on one of the dirt roads here. I was always getting flats on rocks, so I stopped driving that road so often.

Really spoke tube wheels were never a problem for me. I never got that many flats with them and they were very easy to patch a tube if needed. Bead breaks easy enough with a clamp and no need to take the tire off most the time, just pull the tube out a bit, heat patch it, push it in and air it up. Ready to ride again! Fast simple and easy!
If no center stand just lay the bike on the side, easier that way anyway.

My Kaw 500 was breaking spokes, had to ride it over to get a semi, I got a couple punctures from the broke spokes and I think it would take me about 15 minutes or less to patch the tube and be riding again. Once I got the semi we loaded the bike in trailer and when I got to a real town with a bike shop I had the rear wheel laced with all new spokes. Back in the 80's no Internet to order from and was no decent shop near me where I lived that could do the wheel or supply the spokes to me.
That was fun riding a bike with rear wheel that had all 10 inner right spokes broken LOL
Only bike I ever had a spoke problem with of all the spoke wheel bikes I've owned also.
 

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Considering how often a flat occurs (I have had one in 20 years and about 200k miles on the bikes), it seems wearing out the pump is a non-issue. But I agree with the CO2 things- a tire the size on the bike will take more than one. Some of those 12v compressors are very small so storage is not too bad, and on a trip it may have other uses (air mattress, etc).
You have a point if you only use it for your own bike flats. I have plugged and aired up more car tires for other people though than I have tires for myself.
My little 12V gets allot of use.
I also use it for my 16' trailer tires, the trailer sits more than used and almost always has a low or flat tire, sometimes all 4 tires! Rotten tires but good enough for short distance and small loads at low speeds, which is what I been using it for when it does get used last few years.
 

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You have a point if you only use it for your own bike flats. I have plugged and aired up more car tires for other people though than I have tires for myself.
My little 12V gets allot of use.
I also use it for my 16' trailer tires, the trailer sits more than used and almost always has a low or flat tire, sometimes all 4 tires! Rotten tires but good enough for short distance and small loads at low speeds, which is what I been using it for when it does get used last few years.
I thought about that later in the evening. I have also assisted many a stranded person and can see where you are coming from.
 

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Slime 12 volt compressor. Available @ Walmart. Under $15.00. Good choice.
 

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I have the little one that almost fits in a pocket for about $10 but don't like it and never use it. Way to slow! I think I used it the day I bought it, once, then tossed it to side of shop in a drawer somewhere.

The larger one is far better and I think worth the little extra space it takes up and couple $ more.

This is the good one I use allot, I have at least 2 of them, I think 3 of them but not sure where the 3rd is at LOL
http://www.walmart.com/ip/Slime-Por...flator-with-Built-in-Gauge-and-Light/14254129

I keep one in wife's car, one on the bike
 

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I hardly ever have a flat in a car/truck. Steel belted radials are extremely puncture resistant. But bike tires have no reinforcement, and are made of very soft rubber. I have found several things sticking in tubeless tires after I got home. They were still holding air. On every flat I ever had on a tube type tire, the tire went flat instantly, and I found the tube all torn up. Moderm motorcycle tubes are only about 1mm thick, and they tend to pop like a balloon when punctured. I have 4mm thick tubes in my XT225. Also have a centerstand. Now those tubes can usually be patched. They are thick enough and strong enough they don't usually shred when punctured. They also resist thorns and other off road hazards better, but a nail, screw, or staple will still go right through them. Unfortunately they only come in dirt bike sizes.
 

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I have the plugger kit and have used it 3 times (only once on my Wing) with awesome results. The Harleys I have repaired with it are still driving on their tires. Bought it from CycleMax.com
 

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I hardly ever have a flat in a car/truck. Steel belted radials are extremely puncture resistant. But bike tires have no reinforcement, and are made of very soft rubber. I have found several things sticking in tubeless tires after I got home. They were still holding air. On every flat I ever had on a tube type tire, the tire went flat instantly, and I found the tube all torn up. Moderm motorcycle tubes are only about 1mm thick, and they tend to pop like a balloon when punctured. I have 4mm thick tubes in my XT225. Also have a centerstand. Now those tubes can usually be patched. They are thick enough and strong enough they don't usually shred when punctured. They also resist thorns and other off road hazards better, but a nail, screw, or staple will still go right through them. Unfortunately they only come in dirt bike sizes.
Ooohh-- almost like a Darkside endorsement...
 
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