Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

Does anyone here use Evans Coolant?? I think it would be awsome in a Wing.
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

Hobie1 uses the stuff, he's a strong proponent of Evans coolant. Do a search on Evans and you'll find quite a few postings.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
531 Posts
imported post

I use Chrysler coolant. Pricey.............looks like thin oil...5 years or 150.000 kms.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,948 Posts
imported post

exavid wrote:
Hobie1 uses the stuff, he's a strong proponent of Evans coolant. Do a search on Evans and you'll find quite a few postings.
Works great for me. I've ran it for over 30,000 miles with no issues at all. Works as advertised.

Cashy yes, but it is an extended drain coolant(250-500K).

I would recommend it to anyone.

Hobie
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,502 Posts
imported post
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
imported post

Another big point is that it has a very high boiling point-this means that you don't need a pressure cap.You run at atmispheric pressure.That means the chance of burns from opening a cap are lowered-you shouldnt have steam pockets in the engine where no liquid contacts the metal surface (hence equal cooling over entire surface). No boil overs in the heat.An engine will take much more heat if it is being equally cooled-so danger from over heating are reduced.I belong to a deisel PU truck forum and a few guys run it there-I would but the amount I would need would be over kill since I don't work the truck nor use it very often.In deisels it eleminates the need for SCAs (cavitation protection. I'm not a sales man but was curious if anyone had run it in thier bike. I hope to run it in the Wing.

Night rider -Thanks for the comment it seems pretty nice-I rode it for the first time today-kinda dissapointing-my hip was so painful I had trouble stopping and starting-I never felt uneasy on a bike till today-I may regret trying it but i wanted to get back into riding B4 it was too late.We will see ,if it doesn't work there will be a nice Wing for sale.(got to go beg the Doctor next week.I need to figure how to keep my knees straighter ( they were bent too sharp) I was fine holding it up but the struggle to get on and off the pegs was real tough. At least it stayed upright :cool::jumper:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,948 Posts
imported post

BTW, I run a 4lb cap, as recommended by Evans to keep a little pressure on the seals and gaskets. The nice thing is that if you do have a hose pop a hole in it, you won't have that cloud of steam but more of a stream. Also, you probably could get away with a simple road repair of, forgive me, duct tape and a hose clamp over the hole to get home. Also, you can add water to the coolant to get the engine full enough so it's properly covered. You will however have to drain and flush the engine again if you want to put pure Evans back in.

Even thought it's a lifetime coolant, I'm going to change it again this spring just to keep it fresh. For $30+ for 3 years of use(10 bucks a year)isn't an unreasonable amount for me to have the piece of mind.

BTW KIT, I use Ride-on Tire sealant and have for the last several years. When I got my Avon Xs replaced after 15k+ miles, there was absolutely no mess for the mechanic to worry about. Great stuff in it's own right.

Have a good one folks. My lovely child-bride is champing at the bit to go out for a while. I do believe I'll indulge her.:jumper:

Regards to all,

Hobie
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,502 Posts
imported post
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

Pretty soon you won't even need an air filter, once the environmentalists and the carbon emission folks get done. The good news is the air will be perfectly clean so you won't need a filter.The bad news is that you won't be allowed to burn gasoline.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
679 Posts
imported post

Kit Carson wrote:
Yes I like Ride/On also. I like anything that is any improvement in technology. Ride/On, platinum spark plugs, moly 60 grease, and now an improved coolant. One day they may even build a better airbox and make the air cleaner accessible.

Kit
I learn something from you guys everyday. Assuming Kit (or someone else has already researched it) I was wondering if this Evans Coolant meets the Honda specs, ie, okay on aluminum engine and doesn't void the warranty?

As far as that air cleaner goes, unless we can get a used transporter off of the Starship Enterprise, I'm afraid its still gonna be a 3 hr job.

Hey Kit, how about a little more info on Ride/On and moly 60 grease?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,502 Posts
imported post
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
679 Posts
imported post

Kit,

I knew I would get a thorough review from you. I am very interested in all three of these products and agree with you about occassionally finding superior products. I will use the moly 60 and most likely the Evans too (I would also change it too, not run it for a lifetime). I agree that water is a terrible thing to put in an engine, especially an aluminum engine. I would use the Ride-on as it sounds like a superiour sealant, but I am considering an internally mounted TPMS on my next tire change, so I have to look into wheither the Ride-on on might ruin the sensors.

I learned (here) about tinyurl.com, but the next thing you will have to teach me is how you change your urls to common names like you did in the above post.

As far as your :bat:Darkside activities go, :bat:I respect your research and it makes sense in many areas, especially after seeing the curvature of the particular tire you are running. I look forward to seeing it at Montrose. The high mileage is enticing, but the run-flat is the ticket. I haven't decided to go that route yet, but you do make a good arguments. Maybe the tire maufactuers will eventually take note at some point and consider making improvements to current 'approved' tires and making run-flats. If the handling as good asyou say, about the only drawback I can see is dealing with the attorney and insurance companies in the event of an accident.

It would be very interesting to mount a lipstick type camera (easy to mount on a bike with a trailer hitch) behind the tire, aimed at the contact patch on a bike with a m/c tire and then on your bike to see how the tireslook in the twisties. Could even possibly mount one under the bike, aimed aft at the tire's contact patch. Then have the same driver, at the same speeds, in the same weather conditions, negoitate the same roadway section.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6 Posts
imported post

Based on the info on their site, Evans NPG+ is new and improved, and preferred over NPG? (The verbage on the site indicates that NPG+ may be replacing NPG?) NPG is Propylene Glycol. There might be at least some Ethylene Glycol in the NPG+ because they note that it may not be allowed at some motorcycle racetracks that prohibit Ethylene Glycol coolants. All that said, it sounds to me like the NPG+ is significantly better due to a 32% increase in thermal conductivity, and a 65% reduction in viscosity. Is there any reason to think that the plus version (NPG+) is undesirable for use in the 1800??
 

·
Piled Higher and Deeper
Joined
·
4,513 Posts
imported post

The advantages have been stated, but you have heard only the “infomercial” presentation of advantages.

Like everything, there are disadvantages too.

I won’t get into the rheology and thermodynamics; I’ll leave it to the interested to do their own research.

There are two issues:

1- Evans coolants are more viscous that glycol/water mixtures, reducing both convective heat transfer and pump flow volumes (NPG+ is better than NPG).
2- Evans coolants have specific heat capacities that are significantly less than typical glycol/water mixtures, again reducing the heat transfer effectiveness that can only be overcome by increased flow (which is actually less due to item 1.)

Bottom line: The cooling performance of you system will be degraded (compared to a properly functioning stock system) by using Evans coolants.

If the Gold Wing can tolerate these two issues, then perhaps the advantages outweigh the disadvantages. Hobie1 is a test case that says “yes”. There are a number of similar anecdotal data points on the web that indicate higher overall operating temperatures.

AS for me and my Gold Wing, I'll stick to proven products that have proven better performance.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6 Posts
imported post

By the way...in my haste to ask questions, I neglected my manners. Thanks to Kit for the info and the links, and to all here who are sharing their knowledge and experience. As a Touring rider, I appreciate the "community" very much.

Tbear171, Wisconsin
2004 Goldwing (Red)
35,800 Miles and yearning for spring
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
679 Posts
imported post

sandiegobrass wrote:
The advantages have been stated, but you have heard only the “infomercial” presentation of advantages.

Like everything, there are disadvantages too.

I won’t get into the rheology and thermodynamics; I’ll leave it to the interested to do their own research.

There are two issues:

1- Evans coolants are more viscous that glycol/water mixtures, reducing both convective heat transfer and pump flow volumes (NPG+ is better than NPG).
2- Evans coolants have specific heat capacities that are significantly less than typical glycol/water mixtures, again reducing the heat transfer effectiveness that can only be overcome by increased flow (which is actually less due to item 1.)

Bottom line: The cooling performance of you system will be degraded (compared to a properly functioning stock system) by using Evans coolants.

If the Gold Wing can tolerate these two issues, then perhaps the advantages outweigh the disadvantages. Hobie1 is a test case that says “yes”. There are a number of similar anecdotal data points on the web that indicate higher overall operating temperatures.

AS for me and my Gold Wing, I'll stick to proven products that have proven better performance.
Well, sandiegobrass, you make some excellent points too. I will just have to keep following this thread awhile before I make any changes. That's what is great about this forum, you get all sides of an issue expressed in a relatively short period of time.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6 Posts
imported post

Thanks for the input Jim, but your comment leads me to wonder why Evans is used in Racing Bikes, if the cooling performance is actually less?
We took an 8,200 mile trip out west this past Aug pulling our camper, and the bike very nearly hit redline two different times in the mountains due to hot weather and slow going. We cooled it off as soon as we could, and suffered no apparent damage, however we have more trips planned for this year and I am looking for ways to prevent a repeat of this problem. I already use Amsoil, and Platinum Plugs to reduce heat problems. With the cooling fans kicking out at 15mph, and no remedy available for that, what else can a guy do to cool down the bike/
Tbear171
 

·
Piled Higher and Deeper
Joined
·
4,513 Posts
imported post

Tbear171 wrote:
Thanks for the input Jim, but your comment leads me to wonder why Evans is used in Racing Bikes, if the cooling performance is actually less?.....
First of all Evans would use it in anything that put there name out there (it is called advertising), so what they say who uses it, doesn't matter..

but Evans would be a better choice in the following situations..

(1A) Very high output engines where they have experienced very high temperature hot spots in the engine. In this case, the developed pressures in the coolant sytem could be hundreds of psi making it impossible to keep coolant in the engine... In this case, it might be an advantage to keep the cooling system working (albeit less efficient) than not at all. I might add that higher flow coolant pumps are also recommended and sold by Evans.

(1B) Very high output engines (with very high output flow pumps where pump cavitation is an issue.

(2) In high altitude situation (for example with liquid cooled aircraft engines) where the the normal low altitude pressures cannot be maintained and loss of coolant might be catastrophic due to lower boiling points of conventional coolants.
 

·
Piled Higher and Deeper
Joined
·
4,513 Posts
imported post

Tbear171 wrote:
....We took an 8,200 mile trip out west this past Aug pulling our camper, and the bike very nearly hit redline two different times in the mountains due to hot weather and slow going. ...... I am looking for ways to prevent a repeat of this problem. .....
Evans will not improve your situation... In fact, I'd say it will make it worse (you will run hotter), although you would have the saitisfaction that the coolant would be less likely to be blowing the hoses, or out the overflow, the fact is, it can't cool as well.

In fact, I'd recommend completely cleaning your system and using 60% water and 40% ethylene glycol.. that is about the ideal mixture for the very best cooling effectiveness.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top