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That is interesting.
 

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Piaggio MP3, was 02 GL1800
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
a lot of "hands on" in the process, much more than I had envisioned
 

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I just ordered/rec'd. another new Shinko for the front of my Valkyrie Trike. Has a mfr. date of 3521 so hasn't been sitting around long. Probably won't install it until spring, too cold up here in Green Bay to work in the shop anyway. Haven't decided on replacements for the rear wheels yet, thinking about the Michelin Crossclimate 2. Looks like a good tire but will look further.
 

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2008 GL1800 Airbag "Titanium Torpedo". Former 1987 GL1200.
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I wonder what the processes are like at Bridgestone or Dunlop. It looked like there were a lot of imperfections in the rubber sheets as they made their way through the process in the video.
 

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I didn’t see them put a balance dot on the tire.
A lot of tires don't have a balance dot. It's useless unless you check the balance of the rim without a tire on it.
 
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2003 Red Goldwing 1800
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All I have to say is Shinko tires that I have had on several bikes have cost me less and given zero problems, the last one on my wing gave me more mileage than the Bridgestones ever had and for a lot less. If you are worried about a tire made in Korea just think that their are more 2wheeled vehicles in that country than ours. If price is the determing factor remember that the wages in the country are far lower than ours and that is the market they target.
 

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Well it look like any other tire makers, I looked at you tube and called up tire making and looked like they all make the round donut the same way I was just curious how others make the tires I may try a set of new se890 which is for the touring bikes,
 

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I agree with the wear and cost. I have owned 5 Shinzo on various bikes and never had a problem. But not #6. I filed a claim due to a factory defect which was posted on this site by another user. Same issue, same symptoms. He was reimbursed completely, I was not. They denied the claim due to two factors. One the red dot was not lined up to where they said it was to be and two ii had the tire pressure set at 38 not 42. Neither of these would cause the bike to wander at the rear at 65mph increasing as speeds increased. To get the warranty coverage, I would have to reinstall the tire, align the dot, pressure it to 42, take pictures and resubmit. Am not happy with customer service.
 

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I agree with the wear and cost. I have owned 5 Shinzo on various bikes and never had a problem. But not #6. I filed a claim due to a factory defect which was posted on this site by another user. Same issue, same symptoms. He was reimbursed completely, I was not. They denied the claim due to two factors. One the red dot was not lined up to where they said it was to be and two ii had the tire pressure set at 38 not 42. Neither of these would cause the bike to wander at the rear at 65mph increasing as speeds increased. To get the warranty coverage, I would have to reinstall the tire, align the dot, pressure it to 42, take pictures and resubmit. Am not happy with customer service.
Someone was just hunting for an excuse not to warranty the tire. You should ask just where exactly should that red dot be? And there is easily 4 PSI difference in a lot of tire gauges, which one is right?

When performing uniformity match-mounting, the red mark on the tire, indicating the point of maximum radial force variation, should be aligned with the wheel assembly's point of minimum radial run-out, which is generally indicated by a colored dot or a notch somewhere on the wheel assembly (consult manufacturer for details). Radial force variation is the fluctuation in the force that appears in the rotating axis of a tire when a specific load is applied and the tire rotated at a specific speed. It is necessary to minimize radial force variation to ensure trouble-free installation and operation. Not all wheel assemblies indicate the point of minimum radial run-out, rendering uniformity match-mounting sometimes impossible. If the point of minimum radial run-out is not indicated on a wheel assembly, the weight method of match-mounting should be used.
 
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