Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

21 - 40 of 85 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
537 Posts
imported post

There is some good reading and good advise. The 2 things too remember have been said already. You are invisable and look where you want to go. I do not agree with starting out with a smaller bike. a big bike does not handle the same as a small bike. learn on what you want to ride. In 73 the first bike I rode was a71 500 triple Kawasaki which was the biggest and fastest of the time. pay attention to your postion on the road in relationship to other cars. Example: if you are riding on a 2 lane following a car, pay attention to the distance between you and the car. not just being too close but also being too far behind that a car will be invited to turn in front of you. people have a hard time judging speed of small vehicles
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
104 Posts
imported post

i have been reading to try to find out how to get your bike up when it goes down..mine has gone down 2 times..one my falt .the kick stand wasnt all the way down in the garage..the other when my son stopped fast at the end of a drive way on i was a bit to close .no one hurt an not the bike just my pride ..thanks richr
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
104 Posts
imported post

i saw that there was a video on how to do it but dont know where to find it..thanks richr
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,381 Posts
imported post

rmiller788 wrote:
I have never ridden a motorcycle and I am looking for some tips on getting into riding. I plan on taking a Motorcycle Safety Class to get some saftey tips and get my License endorsement, but there are always those little things that help as you get started riding.


If you can remember back to when you first started riding or something you learned just last week that made a world of difference in your riding, please post on this thread. This would mean the world to me and probably help others in the same position.


Thank you for anything you can add!!


;)Safety doesn't happen by accident.;)

I didn’t read ALL of the responses here and I'm confident they are all sound but MY rule of thumb is "watch the other persons eyes" I have seen plenty of other drivers look right at me and never see ME!!!!!!!!!!! I watch their eyes and their actions and do what I believe to be appropriate maneuvers. NEVER take for granted that you are seen!!!!!!!!!!!!The MSF course will give all kinds of help.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
36 Posts
imported post

I learned to ride when I turned 50 I had never been on a bike before I took the MSF class and bought a honda 750 and practiced,practiced,practiced until I felt very confident on that bike it took about 1000 miles till I went and bought an ST1300 took a experienced riders course and do so every 2 yrs I now have my wing that I bought new and will continue to practice it never gets old so that I can.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
679 Posts
imported post

I like the advice in this book: Total Control - High Performance Street Riding Techniques by Lee Parks. He also has some very good parking lot technique drills.

The book is geared towards sport bikes, but the advice is universal and will give you a great understanding of how/why bikes are built the way they are and how to operate them efficiently.



:waving: Welcome :waving:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
113 Posts
imported post

I took the MSF course last year. Do that first. My first bike was a FZ-1. Too powerful, and too small for me, but my fear kept me safe. Keep fear as needed until you improve and assume everyone is trying to kill you.

Is it just me or are Prius drivers the worst?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,722 Posts
imported post

Coming from probably the least experienced (aside from you of coarse) rider here, these guys have all hit the nail on the head. Where ever your head is pointed is where you go, and NOBODY see's you, so make sure you are never beside other cars, be an ass if you have to and rabbit out in front of everyone. I took the class, VERY worth it. I also started on a shadow 500, I'm 6' 190lbs, that bike was even a little too big for me to start on, but I got the hang of it in about two weeks. Another thing I learned that they didn't even cover in the class... throttle control. You have to be smooth and delibrate with your throttle. You'd be amazed how easy it is to put too much or too little throttle in and the bike will react violently. That was the hardest part for me, the rest is covered very well in the class. Good luck, and you really should consider a smaller bike to start.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,672 Posts
imported post

JMO but...that is not a beginners bike. As a new rider you are on such a sharp learning curve that dividing your attention between the peculiarities of a heavyweight bike and all the surprises out there on the road can (increased many fold for a new rider) have serious health risks. Take my advises for what you will...buy something smaller to start.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
479 Posts
imported post

Your age & background would be good to let us know. If you're over 45 or so, you have usually collected some wisdom, and common sense, and if you have that the 1100 can be handled. With decent tires these Gold Wings are very good rides, It is at slow-like walking speeds- that the size of the bike is a real issue. Work hard at smooth-a smooth rider can make a Wing really move, and can embarass alot of riders on sportier bike that are not smooth. Smooth means looking ahead and anticipating what YOU need to do. The Gold Wing will not let you down, but if you are not wise you can let the bike down. Lots of great advise here, the one thing I haven't seen is after you get comfortable on pavement, get the Wing off road, and dirt ride it a bit- You will be amazed what it capable of, and it will add to your confidence.
ALWAYS RIDE YOUR OWN RIDE
If you are young and want to show off, and get crazy, it won't matter what cycle your on
ATTGATT=ALL THE GEAR ALL THE TIME
motorcycles are like horses- bigger the horse the easier it is to be overpowered by the horse.
But welcome to our world- it's full of great people, quit worrying- get out there- take the course then ride, then ride some more
 

·
Forum Diplomat
Joined
·
7,368 Posts
imported post

On the subject of "cornering........."


Slow in, fast out, head level!
Slow in, fast out, head level!
Slow in, fast out, head level!
Slow in, fast out, head level!
Slow in, fast out, head level!

(and so on, ad infinitum........!)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #34
imported post

Thank you to everyone who has posted. It has been very encouraging and discouraging to read these posts. I look forward to the challenge and can't wait to be up and riding.

I am 32 years old and have wanted to ride for some time. I am a fairly cautious person. I will have all my gear before taking the bike over to the grocery store lot and practicing at all. My goal is to work on starting, without stalling the bike (slow clutch release to learn the clutch of the bike. Then start working on Clutch/Throttle control. Move into slow turns around the big lot. Make the turns tighter and tighter and then start practicing at faster speeds little by little. My Motorcycle Safety class isn't until May 20th, so I have alittle time to work on these little(big to me)things before then. If it helps with any advice, I am 6'5" and about 250lbs. I am pretty active so I am in pretty good shape and haven't had any issues holding the bike up, of course, not ever getting it to that threshold of tipping over that heavy of a bike.

Also, I am looking for engine guards for my '80 GL1100 if anyone knows of any that are a decent price and won't charge an arm and a leg to ship. Any thoughts??
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
188 Posts
imported post

Don't ever think that you have the bike Mastered, because it will let you know differently.
Never Stop Learning or Practicing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,317 Posts
imported post

Not knowing how old you are, this may be inappropriate.

When my kids friends would sit around dreaming about Ninjas and new Harleys, I would always remind them that Mothers don't notice new dents on old bikes or cars. Don't let your learner also be your dream bike. Pick up something cheap and ragged to learn on.
And always remember, No one has ever gotten hurt from crashing too slowly. Take your time.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
150 Posts
imported post

Your size should dictate your first bike. I had a 20 year break between cycles and my last bike was a 500 Silverwing . I am a big man at 6'6" and 300lbs so there was no way I was going back into the 500 class bikes. The 1100 was almost perfect, I say almost because the Marklandfloor boards and heel toe shifter were not a good match to my size 15 foot. I managed to get my foot wedged under the cylinder and laid it on the gaurds at a stop sign. No harm no foul and I was uninjured except for my prideand the bike was too.

Take the course and ride, I put 5,000 mileson that old wing last year with a few close calls but other than the 1 screwup on my part I did not lay it down and I survived. I moved up to a Valkyrie Interstate this spring and couldnt be happier I finally have a bike that fits me and is comfortable for long trips and has enough power to get me out of some of the situations I got myself into last year.

Lessons learned

1. Ride like a bobble head, defensive driving in a car is one thing but on a bike it's pure survival.

2. Have proper riding gear. Dress for the slide not the ride.

3. Maintenance on a bike is critical, dont go cheap on tires, Brakes or electronics. Buy once cry once.

4. Do a pre ride inspection every ride, Lights, tire pressure, shocks especially on a machine as old as the 1100, oil and brakes. Learn that Murphy is a jerk and when riding a classic bike no matter how good of condition it looks to be in the devil is in the details. Life can get interesting and exciting in short order. You haven't lived untill you have a front brake lock up at highway speeds. LOL



The 1100 is a fine machine, Forgiving, Docile, pretty good handling, brakes and power. It is heavy and low speed handling is not the greatest because of it's size although once rolling it handles like a much smaller lighter bike. Take the advice given on practice in a empty parking lot the more you do the more confident and competent you will be on a bike of any size. And no matter what your friends do wear your helmet it can and will save your life when you lay it down.

There's only 2 kinds of riders, ones that have laid a bike down and ones that havent "yet".
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,076 Posts
imported post

I went straight to an gl1100 after the MSF course but it had been 20 years since id ridden a bike . Now this may sound stupid or strange to some but i go to Utube and watch the videos of advanced training the video is out of England all done by an ex traffic cop he gives a running cometary of what hes doing and going to do yeah all the riding is on the rightside of the road but its stuff you can use here . there stuff he does that i was taught to do by my dad as he was a police traffic driving instructor . When i learned how to drive and ride he would say now ill teach you how to drive and ride the right way the safe way .
 
21 - 40 of 85 Posts
Top