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This problem seems to result from moisture on the circuit board that controls the LCD, and has reportedly been solved by cleaning and sealing the circuit board.



I have compiled suggestions from other contributors along with photos of my own project. Here are some tips that make a somewhat daunting project very doable.



Surprise, you don't have to remove the seat for this project!



A quick overview:

Disconnect battery and remove mirrors, windshield, windshield adjust levers, fairing pockets, ignition switch cover, top inner covers, headlight adjustment knob, foot warmer control knob ( SE models ). Removing the top compartment and radio/cassette deck� is called for in my manual, but I did not find removal necessary. Remove instrument panel cover. This is as far as my manual goes. Next: Disconnect instrument panel housing by removing four screws, separating speedometer cable and two wiring connectors. Remove six screws to remove clear cover from instrument panel housing. Remove four screws each on tach and speedo to disconnect speedo and tach from instrument panel housing. One screw to remove wiring cover from rear of instrument panel housing. Four screws to separate LCD assembly from instrument panel housing. Four screws to access underside of larger circuit board. Clean with isopropyl alcohol, seal with acrylic spray lacquer. Consider replacing instrument panel lights while you have easy access to them. If changing bulbs, don't forget about the one mounted in the LCD assembly. Reassemble.



Some helpful details:

There are three screws holding on the mirrors ( blue arrows ), and one screw ( red arrow ) associated with the windshield adjust lever mechanism that also must be removed to get the instrument panel cover off. The fresh air vents located just below the speakers must be removed before the cover will come off.






Removing these without breaking them is probably the most difficult part of this job. Since you can't see what you are working with until you have it disassembled, I have included two views of these fresh air vents from behind the instrument panel cover after removal.






The vents have two tabs ( red arrows above ) on the top and two more on the bottom that expand behind the dash sub structure and the instrument panel cover. You must compress the tabs so the vent can pass out through the opening in both the dash sub structure and the instrument panel cover. In practice I found that the vent and tabs simply need to clear the dash sub structure. I removed the instrument panel cover with one of the vents remaining in it.






The Clymer Honda GL1500, 1993-2000 manual describes removal of the fresh air vents as follows:



a) To remove the left-hand air vent, reach underneath the fairing and pry the two air vent locking tabs out of the instrument panel. Then pull the fresh air vent out of the instrument panel and remove it.

b) When working on the right-hand air vent, you cannot reach its' locking tabs from underneath the fairing. Instead, use a seal pick or similar tool through the small slits in the air vent housing and pry the locking tables out of the instrument panel. This procedure is difficult and remember, the locking tabs are small and fragile. When the tabs are free, pull the air vent out and remove it.



I didn't try this, but I wonder if a loop of thin wire passed behind a tab in the fresh air vent from the front/inside of the vent could be used to compress/pull the tab from the front.



There are four screws securing the instrument panel housing.






Recommend disconnecting speedo cable from front wheel as this will provide more slack for accessing rear of instrument panel housing, to disconnect the speedometer cable's






two electrical connectors.






Remove six screws securing clear cover to front of instrument panel housing. Keep track of the clock set switch knob when you remove the clear cover. It will fall off. The photo below was taken after all components were removed from the instrument panel housing, but shows the location of the screws that must be removed to extract the speedo, tach and LCD assembly. Remove four screws ( red arrows ) from behind the tach. Remove two screws ( blue arrows ) from behind the speedo. Remove one screw holding wiring cover in place ( yellow arrow ). Disconnect three electrical connectors between LCD circuit board wiring and instrument panel housing. Pull LCD assembly and attached wiring out through face of instrument panel housing.






Removing two additional screws ( red arrows below ) will completely disconnect the speedo from the wiring that attaches it to the instrument panel housing.









Empty instrument panel housing.






The LCD unit has two circuit boards on it. Reportedly it's the larger #2 ( as designated in photo below ) board that needs cleaning and sealing. I have [received] no guidance on dealing with the #1 board and chose to leave it alone.






Remove six screws to separate #2 board from mounting.






The circuit board will remain attached via three ribbon cables, but can be laid out and masked for cleaning and sealing the underside � ( shows just a bunch of solder connections on it ). I removed the tape on the circuit board, shown in the photo below, for cleaning and sealing then replaced it for reassembly. It seems to be located to provide a barrier between the sharp solder points and the wiring compressed against them when the LCD unit is assembled.






Use isopropyl alcohol and an acid brush to clean the #2 board thoroughly. When I began cleaning I found a brown tinged sticky layer on the board surface that seemed easily dissolved by the alcohol. I continued to apply alcohol, scrubbing � the board with the brush and wiping off the brush between applications, until the surface appeared clean under a harsh light and the brush was no longer leaving any brownish material on my wipe towel. This process required four cleaning and drying cycles.


The recommendation I've received is to use 99% isopropyl alcohol. I could not find 99% isopropyl anyplace, so chose to use 91% isopropyl which I found at Walgreens. Don't use the 70% isopropyl as there is too much water in it. Acid brushes (black nylon bristles, rolled metal handles also used for applying soldering flux ) are available at Home Depot and ACE Hardware.

If there is any corrosion evident (usually looks white/powdery) remove it using hand sanitizer and a worn toothbrush, then follow up with isopropyl alcohol. Allow the board to dry completely.

Recommend using a clear acrylic spray lacquer as a conformal coat to seal the board. Use several light coats; heavy coat will take a long time to dry. Suggest masking/covering the board connectors and the rest of the LCD unit carefully to protect them from over-spray.

With that whole repair process in mind, maybe it's 'freeing'� in many ways to just let the clock be wrong!


Good luck and report on your results or additional suggestions!



Happy New Year.



Jim
 

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Excellent guide.

But dont you have to remove seat to get to battery terminals :)
 

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Does it get any better ,,,,,,,, Super Great job!! :clapper::clapper::clapper::clapper:
 

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One other suggestion while you are that far into it, replace the bulbs for the Fuel/Temp gauges and the LCD...
 

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Another job well done, and Indexed for future jobs. Bravo!
 

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Robin wrote:
Excellent guide.

But dont you have to remove seat to get to battery terminals :)
Just the side panel for that.

Great writeup Robin, thanks.
 

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Praise be! :bow::applause:



Thisanswers the first question I ever posted on a motorcycle forum, back in 1998.



I'd given up all hope of a solution.



<added to ever-lengthening list of jobs to do>
 

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Does anyone know if both side of board #2 need to be cleaned? I took mine apart as listed here, scrubbed off the gunk on the backside of board #2 and I still have the same issue. The front side of the board has the gunk on it as well but I wasn't sure if I was supposed to clean both sides. Any help will be appreciated. The job wasn't too hard when following these directions...just scary!:)
 

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it stands to reason that cleaning both sides of the board might be better than just cleaning one side ... but i didn't mess with the side that has all the components on it. i have not yet had a recurrance of the fast clock since putting it all back together ...but have not yet ridden through another rain storm. if the "fix" doesn't last, i'll be sure to let the good readers know!
 

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I went through the entire repair as is described here and the clock still runs a minute every 10 seconds so it's not a fix all. I'll try to disassemble and clean every possible connection before I finally reassemble the dash and live with it. Hopefully I'll find another possible remedy and will post it then.
 

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Great job on the instructions. Hey, if the clock is running slow does that mean the 'wing ages slower?:ROFL: sorry, I jest hads to throw that in...
 

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I tried this several years ago on my '97, but it did not work for me either. Up to the time that I did the cleanup, I had learned from another forum that you could disconnect the battery for a minute and the clock was fine until next ride.

I used the wiring diagram and found the hot wire that feeds the clock. I added a sub-miniature toggle switch in series with the clock, concealing it under my left fairing pocket that is easy to reach.

If my clock is running fast, I turn the toggle switch off, wait a few minutes, then turn the toggle switch back on. (Works the same as disconnecting the battery)
 

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I also had this intermittent "Fast clock syndrome" since I've had the bike for the last six years after washing it or riding it after it has stoodwhen raining the previous day. After adding to the list of jobs to do when the bike was next in bits for routine maintenance the LCD clock task is now complete. After following the described procedure and having a nicely arranged collection of bits on the table, I noticed that in my case there was no sign of any corrosion at all. The offending PCB looked as it was when it left the factory BUT I did notice thatboth sides of thePCB felt a little "sticky" to the touch. As I work with electronics in my day job I thought this should be fun! So I carefully sealed the LCD board and let loose carefully with the 99.9% isopropolalcohol and a long bristle soft brush carefully washing & brushing and blowing off with amedium pressure air line. I did this several times until it sparkled & shone like new. My next problem was the component side felt even more sticky than before I started, Oh well I thought nothing to lose I suppose so I did the same with that side and finally kept rinsing both sides of the PCB and using the air line to blow dry especially from under the components. Both sides of the PCB were now squeaky clean & shining as if brand new, it seemed a shame to recoat with acrylic lacquer. After leaving in the sun to dry for a bit I used a hair dryer to warm the PCB a little and then let it cool down. Sometime later when cool I applied two or three coats of clear acrylic lacquer. When I removed the protective covering I placed over the LCD panel I noticed that there was the odd little "Sticky" patch on the back of that as well. There was no way I was going to wash the back of that panel so I carefully wiped the back of the board with a soft cloth and the same isopropolalcohol. After that all remained was to reassemble the collection of bits on the table the same way I took them apart.

I can now happily report that all seems to be well again. The LCD clock is presently behaving itself. So in conclusion thank youvery much for the above tutorial. It certainly worked in my case.



Regards, Tony.
 

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Ihave a 95 Goldwing Ultimate Trike. I have the same problem with the clock and memory for the radio. I printed and followed the instructions posted to the letter. I also cleaned all connections that we could get to. The clock still has a mind of it's own and it doesn't stay on the radio station. In fact it always changes to the AM band when I turn the key on.

I there possibly a bad relay? Can anyone tell me me which wire is the constant power?

I must say that my circuit boards looked like new. Can anyone HELP please!!!!
 

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fryguy wrote:
Ihave a 95 Goldwing Ultimate Trike. I have the same problem with the clock and memory for the radio. I printed and followed the instructions posted to the letter. I also cleaned all connections that we could get to. The clock still has a mind of it's own and it doesn't stay on the radio station. In fact it always changes to the AM band when I turn the key on.

I there possibly a bad relay? Can anyone tell me me which wire is the constant power?

I must say that my circuit boards looked like new. Can anyone HELP please!!!!
Your problem is not the same as listed. You have a power problem that is not keeping memory to clock/radio when key is off. When you unhook battery on a 1500, radio goes to 530AM and clock resets,i think to 0100, so you indeed have a problem with the hot wire to the memory. Check fuses and relays.Try posting this problem in technical forum and I'm sure someone will tell you how to fix it.:waving:
 

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While looking for a final drive for a friend, someone told me of a guy parting out a '99 1500, so I bought the dash. I took the LCD/temp/fuel gauge pod out and followed the instructions in this thread. I installed the new and improved system in my '97 and voila! This morning my clock still had the proper time! A small victory, but a victory all the same.

The bonus is that I have done the same treatment to my old unit and now have a spare. I also took the time to change out my stock speakers for some new 5 1/2" 2-way Pioneers and gave everything a good cleaning.

***On a helpful note, I found it was easier to remove the dash by removing the windshield garnish and the turn signals. Then, you can reach through and squeeze the air vent tabs by hand and not break them.***
 
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