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1998 GL1500 SE
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Discussion Starter #1
A little over a week ago I changed the rear tire on my bike ( '98 GL1500 SE ). Because there are 115K miles on the bike and the rear rotor was getting thin, I put a used one on from my friends parts bike (also a 98 GL1500). When he brought it over he explained that he had "Sanded off the surface rust" with a die grinder/scotch bright pad. - Some of it looked/felt like he'd rubbed it a little to hard- I installed it anyway.
Yes you have guessed it- the rear brake shakes like a dog trying to poop a razor blade.
My thought is this.. Can I Flatten/smooth out the high spots by using the brake caliper with sanding stones in place of the brake pads?
If I have it on the center stand and press lightly on the brake pedal the stones will touch the high spots- should make an intermittent sound as it touches the high spots right?. - ok now only do this for a minute to not heat up the rotor-and or spray water on it to keep it cool.. And remembering to only press the brake pedal just enough to make the stones close and touch the high spots... with a constant pedal position eventually the intermittent sanding sound will gradually be reduced as the highest spots are lessened.. repeat the process with slightly more pedal pressure--
My thought is to use a small weight on the brake pedal to hold that constant position, then add a weight to it for each sanding sequence thereafter.. Say a stack of 3/4" bolt washers or something like that (haven't figured that out yet)- allowing the pedal return spring to be the counteracting force.
Am I nuts for thinking this way? should I just man-up and buy a new rotor? OR Would you guys like to know the results of this Science Project??
What are your thoughts? -
 

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The problem is the caliper will want to slide in & out with the warpage of the rotor so it may just grind it without changing anything.
 

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One time I changed a rotor and thought it was warped because it "chirped" when riding "tugged" intermittently when stopping. Turned out that even thought I had cleaned the mounting surfaces, they were not clean enough. Re-cleaned, re-installed and have been using the rotor ever since.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I did a pretty nice job of cleaning the mounting surfaces- knowing that it only takes .003" of warp to feel it in the pedal.
That said, maybe I'm being Stupid and or Cheap in thinking I can fix it- Didn't know the condition of the rotor when it was being used on the parts bike.
 

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A little over a week ago I changed the rear tire on my bike ( '98 GL1500 SE ). Because there are 115K miles on the bike and the rear rotor was getting thin, I put a used one on from my friends parts bike (also a 98 GL1500). When he brought it over he explained that he had "Sanded off the surface rust" with a die grinder/scotch bright pad. - Some of it looked/felt like he'd rubbed it a little to hard- I installed it anyway.
Yes you have guessed it- the rear brake shakes like a dog trying to poop a razor blade.
My thought is this.. Can I Flatten/smooth out the high spots by using the brake caliper with sanding stones in place of the brake pads?
If I have it on the center stand and press lightly on the brake pedal the stones will touch the high spots- should make an intermittent sound as it touches the high spots right?. - ok now only do this for a minute to not heat up the rotor-and or spray water on it to keep it cool.. And remembering to only press the brake pedal just enough to make the stones close and touch the high spots... with a constant pedal position eventually the intermittent sanding sound will gradually be reduced as the highest spots are lessened.. repeat the process with slightly more pedal pressure--
My thought is to use a small weight on the brake pedal to hold that constant position, then add a weight to it for each sanding sequence thereafter.. Say a stack of 3/4" bolt washers or something like that (haven't figured that out yet)- allowing the pedal return spring to be the counteracting force.
Am I nuts for thinking this way? should I just man-up and buy a new rotor? OR Would you guys like to know the results of this Science Project??
What are your thoughts? -
I am interested to find out the results...

But would buy a new one anyway!
I have an 89 gl 1500, and I'm learning alot!
 

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I did a pretty nice job of cleaning the mounting surfaces- knowing that it only takes .003" of warp to feel it in the pedal.
That said, maybe I'm being Stupid and or Cheap in thinking I can fix it- Didn't know the condition of the rotor when it was being used on the parts bike.
I'm as cheap as most anyone. I think you can try what you said but I bet you will end up living with the issue or replacing the rotor.
 

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If I was doing this I would find a rotor that was flat. No lumps or warps. This is the breaks your working on. Plus it's not that easy to change the rotor on a wheel. Lot's of labor to put back together and find it's not right. Good Luck
 

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I'm as cheap as most anyone. I think you can try what you said but I bet you will end up living with the issue or replacing the rotor.
I would not do what you are suggesting. You only have two hands and this sounds pretty dangerous with all the spinning parts. Car rotors can be turned true but the rotors on the GW already are so thin, although there might be a minimum spec on them. Although expensive, I would suggest buying new! Just my 2 cents!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well... For those of you who Wanted to see/hear about this science project.. Sorry, I'm not doing it- To Much trouble to go through all that - I'm putting a new rotor on Right Now.
 

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I sold two good rotors not long ago, cheap too. Looks like you are in the market now as your's sounds to be fubar.

I also recently bought a pair of front rotors off Ebay with only 13,000 miles, virtually like new.
 

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I had my 1800 rotors resurfaced by TruDisk... Guy did a nice job and it was a lot cheaper than new rotors...

https://truedisk.net/
 
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