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Well it happened again...tried to start the bike....click..click...click...battery near dead.

Charged the battery..started the bike and measured voltage at the bat (~3000 rpm...12.87V..to low.)

- Either stator went out (again...
- Bad regulator...
- Bad wiring...

Stator was replaced last year, and connections were soldered and heat-shrunk.

Here's my test procedures...
- Removed the false tank.
- Unplugged the rectifier (plug looked ok)

Stator test:
- Check between the stator legs (yellow wires)for continuity using an ohm-meter. It does not mater in what sequence you measure.
- Check each leg to ground with an ohm-meter. You should get an O.L (Open Line) reading. If you have continuity to ground on any leg, the stator is bad.

If the stator measures good then proceed...

- Start the bike (rectifier still unplugged) and bring the rpms up to ~ 3000. You should measure about 50-60 VAC (Volts AC) between the three legs (yellow wires) on the stator.


Regulator/rectifier test:

I used a digital meter, an analog should work as well.

The regulator/rectifier consists of a series of diodes that make DC out of the AC that the stator supplies.
Using an Ohm-meter we check if these diodes are good or not. You will be making a resistance (Ohm) reading.

Wires / terminals on the regulator/rectifier plug:
- 2x Red with white stripe. This is DC out to bat.
- 3x Yellow. Stator AC in
- 2x Green. Ground.
- 1x Black with green stripe. Sense line in.

Test 1...
Take the black lead from the ohm meter and place it on either GREEN terminal.
Take the red lead from the meter and measure each YELLOW terminal.
You should get readings of around 5-40 Ohms

Reverse the leads and measure again. The readings now should show no continuity or infinity or open line.

Test 2..
Take the red lead from the ohm meter and place it on either Red/White terminal.
Take the black lead from the meter and measure each YELLOW terminal.
You should get readings of around 5-40 Ohms

Reverse the leads and measure again. The readings now should show no continuity or infinity or open line.

Plug the regulator / rectifier back in and start the bike. Bring the rpms up to ~ 3000.
Measure the voltage at the plug between the GREEN and Red/White wires. Record this reading.

Now measure at the battery. The reading should be close to the same +- .5 V.

My readings were over 1 V difference, indicating a wiring issue somewhere (corroded or dirty connections)

- The stator wiring had already been soldered and heat-shrunk tubing installed. If you still have the OEM plug, get rid of this as it will cause problems.

- The plug at the rectifier looked OK but I decided to eliminate any chances of poor connections and soldered / heat-shrunk the wires here as well. A lot of older wings may very well have issues here with 20+ year old connections. My son's 1200 had a burnt plug causing charging issues.

- The Red/White wire from the regulator/rectifier will come down to the starter solenoid. This is where I found the terminal burnt and corroded.

There are six leads to the starter solenoid:
- Bat power (Heavy cable)
- To starter motor (heavy cable)
- 1x Red to terminal. This supplies the bike with power.
- 1x Red/White to terminal. Power to charge the battery.
- 1x Green(ish), to the solenoid coil.
- 1x yellow(ish), to the solenoid coil.

Purchased two 30A fuse holders and installed one on the Red/White wire and the other on the Red wire. Then both were connected to the large solenoid terminal connected to the battery.
This also eliminates the OEM fuse-able link, which after inspection had corrosion on it.

With all the connections now soldered and heat-shrunk, and the new terminations at the solenoid, my charging problems are gone.

Measured voltage at the battery (at idle) was 12.85 to 12.92 VDC.
At ~3000RPM the voltage climbed to 14.7- 14.9.

I hope this tidbit can help someone.

Regards, Bart
 

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Thanks Bart. Alternatives would be buying an EC or Dave Cambell harness, so you save a few quid there.
 

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1985 GL1200 Limited Edition
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Dutchman wrote:
The Red/White wire from the regulator/rectifier will come down to the starter solenoid. This is where I found the terminal burnt and corroded.

There are six leads to the starter solenoid:
- Bat power (Heavy cable)
- To starter motor (heavy cable)
- 1x Red to terminal. This supplies the bike with power.
- 1x Red/White to terminal. Power to charge the battery.
- 1x Green(ish), to the solenoid coil.
- 1x yellow(ish), to the solenoid coil.

Purchased two 30A fuse holders and installed one on the Red/White wire and the other on the Red wire. Then both were connected to the large solenoid terminal connected to the battery.
This also eliminates the OEM fuse-able link, which after inspection had corrosion on it.
An excellent post Bart but I believe the part I underlined is incorrect.. The red/white wire and the red wire which are located at the front of the starter selinoid plug connector both route inside the connector to the right 30amp dogbone fuse mounting post and do not need a 30amp fuse on each wire. If you hook a 30amp fuse on each wire you're effectivly doubling the amperage needed beforethey'll blow possibly causing damage to the electrical system components or even causing an electricalfire if you have a short!!



The Fuelies are the only GL1200 the has 2, 30amp dogbone main fuses but that's an entirely different animal as you've got a larger stator with more wattage and more stuff to run like the CFI computer, Cruise Control, and such...



As allways I stand ready to be corrected and I apologise if I'm wrong but, I did check the schematic before posting and I don't think I read it wrong....
 

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roscoepc wrote:
Dutchman wrote:
The Red/White wire from the regulator/rectifier will come down to the starter solenoid. This is where I found the terminal burnt and corroded.

There are six leads to the starter solenoid:
- Bat power (Heavy cable)
- To starter motor (heavy cable)
- 1x Red to terminal. This supplies the bike with power.
- 1x Red/White to terminal. Power to charge the battery.
- 1x Green(ish), to the solenoid coil.
- 1x yellow(ish), to the solenoid coil.

Purchased two 30A fuse holders and installed one on the Red/White wire and the other on the Red wire. Then both were connected to the large solenoid terminal connected to the battery.
This also eliminates the OEM fuse-able link, which after inspection had corrosion on it.
An excellent post Bart but I believe the part I underlined is incorrect.. The red/white wire and the red wire which are located at the front of the starter selinoid plug connector both route inside the connector to the right 30amp dogbone fuse mounting post and do not need a 30amp fuse on each wire. If you hook a 30amp fuse on each wire you're effectivly doubling the amperage needed before they'll blow possibly causing damage to the electrical system components or even causing an electrical fire if you have a short!!

 

The Fuelies are the only GL1200 the has 2, 30amp dogbone main fuses but that's an entirely different animal as you've got a larger stator with more wattage and more stuff to run like the CFI computer, Cruise Control, and such...

 

As allways I stand ready to be corrected and I apologise if I'm wrong but, I did check the schematic before posting and I don't think I read it wrong....
No problem at all...

You're correct when looking at the diagram..
I just took a different point of view...

The Red wire supplies all the power to the bike, so it is essentially drawing through the fuse-able link from the battery.
I mimicked this with a blade style fuse holder and 30A fuse. So really nothing has changed here.

The Red/White comes from the regulator/rectifier and is the charge lead for the battery. It draws nothing, but only supplies power (from the stator/rectifier/regulator).

This was directly tied into the Red wire at the solenoid.(connected to the same terminal bar) There was no fuse protection on this red/white wire.

Since I had to rework this terminal end anyways (it was all burnt up and corroded) I added a fuse holder to the Red/White wire as well.

This did not double any fuse protection from 30A to 60A

The way it's wired now..
- The feed to the bike is protected with a 30A fuse (Red wire)
- The feed to the battery is protected by a 30A fuse. (Red/white wire)

Cheers, Bart
 

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I agree with your thinking Bart.
 
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