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Recently purchased GL1100, '82 Interstate/

Whenever bumps or depressions in roadway encountered, front end would bottom out.

Discovered almost no oil in right fork,and recommended air pressure in forks would not hold.

Threads on drain plug on right fork appear to be partially stripped, plug cannot be tightened enough to prevent leaks.

Any advice on a fix would be appreciated..

Thanks.

Polkwing
 

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There will likely be several opinions on how to best fix this, but you will likely have your own comfort zone. A few options here; Heli-Coil, threaded plug called "Keen-Serts" or something, or tapping a little oversize are a few of them.

Since the repair must contain slippery oil under variable pressures, you need to maintain the sealing face. I haven't had this problem yet, so I never paid attention to the fork drain screws' design. Are there O-rings involved, or just little sealing flat washers?

Without seeing the feature 1st-hand, I think I would research the current size thread size, and compare the closest "next size" between both metric and english, to take the screw a little oversize while still retaining the original sealing surface, then re-thread. Make sure you have a suitable replacement screw in-hand before you make the committment, though.

The HeliCoil would be my personal next choice, as they have always worked well for me in salvaging spark plug holes, but I don't know how small the thread sizes are available. I think I have one kit here that is a 6mm, but not sure...might be 10mm (memory is the 1st thing to go, don't'cha know?)
 

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Howdy POLKWING :waving: You are Very Welcome to The Worlds Greatest Goldwing Forum. :clapper::clapper::clapper::clapper:

The very best of good luck with your new to you :11red:

:leprechaun::18red::leprechaun:
 

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Thanks for the reply. Drain plug ( screw or whatever) has a thin copper washer.

Neighbor suggested cleaning screw threads and interior of the hole with acetone to remove oil residue, then wrap the screw with as much teflon as possible and try that.

I did, tightened the plug screw hand-tight but applied no pressure with a wrench.

Not sure this will work and won't know until fluid is in., fork cap back on ans air psi up to recommended. If that doesn't do it will try one of your suggestions. This old dog looks good but..bought it with odometer reading 40 K.Hoiwever plenty of evidence this is second time around. Either that or previous owners didn't know anything about maintenance. Otherwise, cycle is in pretty good shape.

Thanks for the come-back.

Polkwing
 

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There's a fair amount of meat around the drain hole, shouldn't be too hard to drill and tap a bit larger. That wouldn't require as large a hole as a Helicoil. I wouldn't want to use teflon tape or anything like that, there could be fairly high shock pressure on the oil when the bike hits a bump. It won't do any good for handling if you've got a different response on each side of the fork every time you hit a bump.
 

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Larger hole and plug to fit makes sense. I don't have tools to do that...think I will leave it to my cycle repair shop.

Thanks for the suggestion.

Polkwing
 

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I was going to tap for an oversize bolt but as a temporary measure degreased damaged thread in my 82Gl1100 and glued drain plug back with loctite been running ok for two years now with upto 21psi in front forks.

Good luck Stiggy
 

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POLKWING wrote:
Recently purchased GL1100, '82 Interstate/

Whenever bumps or depressions in roadway encountered, front end would bottom out.

Discovered almost no oil in right fork,and recommended air pressure in forks would not hold.

Threads on drain plug on right fork appear to be partially stripped, plug cannot be tightened enough to prevent leaks.

Any advice on a fix would be appreciated..

Thanks.

Polkwing
POLKWING, try the easy things first like a slightly longer screw (it's a standard metric thread) Takethe old one to any local metric motorcycle dealer & they can probably fix you right up with a longer screw.. The sealing surface will allow most any screw head design to work with the originalseal ring..



If the longer screw inthe above won't hold then the easy thing to do is go up one thread size on screw (bolt) size (try the next upsize up in an American screw as that will require a smaller hole).. To get access to the hole to tap it to the next size you will have to remove the anti-dive valve from the fork lower (simple to do just pull the screws out & pull it off)..



Twisty
 

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Discussion Starter #9
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Cutting new threads and putting in an oversized bolt seemed to be the most oft recommended by others. That procedure is beyond me and nearest cycle repair shop is 20miles away.

Your advice relieves my anxiety so will give it a try. Took me mega effort and time to get the fork caps back on after putting in new fluid. Following your suggestion will mean going thru all that again but if it works, beats hauling the old cycle to the shop and paying shop time for the labor.

This website is great; just logged on over the weekend and am impressed with the number and content of helpful suggestions.

Have a "gooder" and thanks for your advice.

Polkwing

PS: After-thot: what did you use to degrease the bolt and hole threads?. I tried acetone but kept getting evidence of old oil on the cotton swabs.
 

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Polkwing:

You sure It's losing 1 lb. a day??? Every time you use pressure gauge you'll lose about a lb. That little pssssst you hear is air escaping. Pump it up to where you want it, then don't check it for a wk. or so. Hopefully you'll be surprised.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
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John 424

Hadn't thot of that but makes sense. Pumped it up just now, will check it in a week as you suggest.

One last question: any idea the source of a small hand air pump for these purposes?

. Manual says don't use big air compressor...too much pressure too fast. Getting a little old running 1100 up to the shop or dragging 60 ft of air hose down to the cycle shed. Age is getting to me.

Thanks for your suggestion.

Polkwing.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
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Thanks to all who suggested fixes.

Finally..got a replacement drain plug same size as original, fronted it with a copper washer, put it in and...did the trick. Stripped threads apparently only on the plug and not in fork proper.

However, psi not holding,losing about one pound per day....checked hose connections and air connector with soapy water...no air leaks.

Now, where is air leaking? Not sure where to go from here.

Polkwing
 

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One last question: any idea the source of a small hand air pump for these purposes?
Please? Not the Wally World bicycle ones with the 90 degree plastic end bend and lever... I'd like to find the kind with a real screw-on hose.

I don't know if they're still made, but I remember one in the late 70's that was made from about a 100/250cc hypo that had a screw-on hose in place of the needle. Haven't seen one in years.

One would think they still exsist since touring bikes with air have been around for a while now. :baffled:
 

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Good news. Found a hand pump with pressure gauge attached, release button to reduce excess pressure, screw on fitting, at the local bicycle shop. They had several models but this onehas a flexible hose and screw on fitting that would reach down below handlebars to the air connector at top of a fork cap.

Only downer, price was $30. Maybe cheaper somewhere else but looked to be the right type. One other limit: pressure gauge only reads to 20 psi, enough for front forks but not enough for rear shock pressure. Might be able to pump in more air but gauge would not register above 20 psi.

Polkwing.
 

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POLKWING wrote:
Only downer, price was $30. Maybe cheaper somewhere else but looked to be the right type. One other limit: pressure gauge only reads to 20 psi, enough for front forks but not enough for rear shock pressure. Might be able to pump in more air but gauge would not register above 20 psi.
THANKS! :clapper: Don't really care about the guage... Do you have a name/model number? I'll try and see if I remember what a bicycle shop looks like and find one near me.


Ken
 

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Not a clue about model number, make or anything else.

Pump has chromed barrel, about 6" long, fitted into 3/4" section with gauge attached at right angles. Pressure release button on opposite of the gauge. Reads "bars" in red up 300, psi in black up to 20. Number on back of the gauge is 0603, whatever than may mean.

Beyond gauge is a 3.5" flex hose with a screw-on fitting. Plunger that goes down into main body about 6" long with umbrella -haped handle at top.

This will handle front shock psi up to 20 psi. Don't know if pump would continue to up psi in rear shock which manual says will handle psi up to around 54 psi.

OK..not much help. However, are you in touch with J and P Cycles, huge outlet somewhere in Iowa?..If they don't have it, you don't need it. They will send free a humungus catalog.(www.jpcycles.com is the e-mail address). Would be worth your time to get a catalog.

On p.520, lower LH corner, is a Mini Pocket Pump capable of up to 200 psi, for $19.00. It does NOT have a gauge.Shipping is another $7 but this may be exactly what you want.

Thanks for the come-back. Live in W Oregon, heavy rains this week, cycles off the road and under cover, maybe for the rest of 2006!? Rubber side down and all that stuff.

Polkwing
 

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That be the one I remember... Glad to see they still make it. If I can't find one local I'll be ordering.

Now I just have to find someone local to R&R fork seals cheap in one day starting with me riding up on the bike. Don't think I can handle it. Wing is a daily driver and is a lot more comfortable on what's left of the right leg than climbing in/out of a cage. :baffled:

Just got done with the shocks. Easy compared to the forks... Seals were good so all I needed to do was drain/refill the ATF and put new boots on them. Two "half" days start to finish! Well... I did have help getting the wing on the center stand. ;)

Ken
 
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