Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
700 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

Hi (again),

If my forks aren't leaking, should I change the oil anyway? It's an 83 GL1100 Interstate that sat garaged for probably 10 years.

Jack
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,183 Posts
imported post

Sure. It's cheap insurance. Fluid does tend to collect moisture and other nasty things when sitting long periods of time. Sure, it's a sealed system, but the air you add to the front suspension does contain some moisture.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,028 Posts
imported post

Fork oil turns to a mushy grey substance after about 2 years. Once it does its useless. 10 years is way too long so I'd advise changing it now.
 

·
Senior Guru
Joined
·
2,234 Posts
imported post

I totally agree with Jason. Don't forget to change the oil in the rear shocks as well.

You can also tailor the oil viscosity to your regular riding weight and riding style by using heavier and lighter weight oils. I ride mostly two up so I've chosen to use 20W fork oil, but, if you always ride solo and never get into performance driving you could use 5W or 10W fork oil for a smoother ride.

(Stay away from 30W fork oil unless you enjoy a truck like ride. Been there, done that and got rid of the 30W shortly after I put it in. )



Vic
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
183 Posts
imported post

the fork caps are not easy to get back on. If I were to change my fork oil again I would find a syringe an inject the fork oil into the air hose fitting instead of removing the fork tube baps.



I have an 83 Aspencade. I had to enlist the help of a very strong friend to get the caps back on.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
700 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
imported post

Goldwinger1984 wrote:
I totally agree with Jason.  Don't forget to change the oil in the rear shocks as well.

Vic


Hi Vic,

Is there a write-up anywhere for the rear shocks? My Clymer makes no mention of it.

Someone else mentioned filling the oil through the air opening with a syringe so as to avoid removing the impossible-to-reinstall caps. Any comments on that?

Jack
 

·
Other side of the pond
Joined
·
3,409 Posts
imported post

Definitely change the fork oil. You will notice a big improvement in handling. Removing the little air caps is a good idea for putting the new oil in. If you need the help of a "very strong friend" to put the caps back, chances are you have Progressives in the forks. They really are hard to push down. The standard Honda springs are a one man job.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,153 Posts
imported post

I had a GL1100 from new and after three years and only 9000 miles the forks were bottoming out. New fork oil made it good as new again. The oil just goes bad, even if you never use the bike and keep it garaged indoors.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
145 Posts
imported post

I didn't have a big friend to help put the caps back on after changing the seals and oil. So I took a 8" C clamp drilled a hole in it and used a screw through the hole in the fork tree. There was a little piece of the fork tree that stuck out with a hole in it on both sides of the tree, I dropped a screw through the hole and placed the drill hole in the C-clamp on the screw. This kept the C-clamp from sliding off. I used a flat top Stanley wrench and maneuvered the C-clamp over the wrench and used the clamp to push the spring and cap into place. It took a little muscle but went back on fairly easy.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,304 Posts
imported post

I suggest you remove the caps when you replace the oil. The first time I changed the fork oil I added it through the drain hole. This resulted in to much oil and blown seals shortly after.

Getting the caps back on isn't too bad even when I added spacers to each side. More importantly you can make sure the correct amount of oil is in the forks. I think 5.5 inches from the top when collapsed is correct.
 

·
Senior Guru
Joined
·
2,234 Posts
imported post

jsmith24 wrote:
Goldwinger1984 wrote:
I totally agree with Jason. Don't forget to change the oil in the rear shocks as well.

Vic
Hi Vic,

Is there a write-up anywhere for the rear shocks? My Clymer makes no mention of it.

Someone else mentioned filling the oil through the air opening with a syringe so as to avoid removing the impossible-to-reinstall caps. Any comments on that?

Jack

Have a look here for Gambler's rear shock rebuild.



http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/view_topic.php?id=14189&forum_id=1&highlight=gl1200+shocks



Vic
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,969 Posts
imported post

k1w1t1m wrote:
More importantly you can make sure the correct amount of oil is in the forks. I think 5.5 inches from the top when collapsed is correct.
I can't verify this....



The Honda Shop Manual states:



1980-1981: 220 cc (7.4 oz)

1982- : 270 cc (9.1 oz)



Pg. 12-7 (depending on which version of the manual that you have)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
41 Posts
imported post

Definately check out the link, gambler does a GREAT job explaining how it's done...with his home made tool no less!
There is another post, I can't remember who by; It's about changing the fork oil / seals w/ another home brew tool...it's also an excellent post..well worth reading....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
298 Posts
imported post

'83 Aspencade:

9.8 oz or 290 cc - Dexron ATF or fork oil ( I used the ATF and I think that I would use a higher weight fork oil next time)

lower spring minimum length = 18.22 inch or 462.8 mm

upper spring minimum length = 4.17 inch or 106 mm

If you do a search you'll find better instructions than I can give you, but three suggestions:

If the fluid doesn't drain from the shock try rotating the adjusting screw of the TRAC to a different number.

Might as well clean the TRAC while you're at it.

Cover the brake rotors with plastic or similar to keep them (and the brake shoes) safe from spilled fluid.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
50 Posts
imported post

do i take needle out of air hose fitting, than shoot with oil by using a syringe? th
anks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
50 Posts
imported post

on the other side i don't see a air fitting, is it where i have arrow pointing, do i take that hose off and shoot oil into that one? thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,295 Posts
imported post

Hey Jack,

YES!!!!! Change your fork and rear shock oil. I personally think it should be every two years myself. Mine was crap (the oil) and drove like a different bike after I did it. Again, nearly afree project for the bike and it did so much to improve the old gal.

This article my give you some ideas as well. Doing the front really worried me until I used a vacuum pump.


http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/forum1/73104.html



Speaking of pumps, give this a look too… good ideas here as well.

http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/forum9/49544-1.html



Every bit of info can spark ne ideas for people. More info here too!

http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/forum1/73007.html

Hope some of these can help.

Tim.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
50 Posts
imported post

from reading these post and others i only have to mess with the right side, take valve needle out of cap and use syringe with oil
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
407 Posts
imported post

To get the Caps back on I took a piece of 2x2x 1 1/2 ft. wood I had laying around and cut a slot in one end to fit over the cap where the hose fits,I clamped the forks in the trees to hold them. With the wood you can push down and turn at the same time. I have done this on 1100's and 1200's and it has worked good for me.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top