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Looking for fork seals for my 84 GL1200. The last onesI bought didn't seemto last but a few miles. What has been the best fork seal on the Wing you ride? All input welcome.
 

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used honda for mine worked fine so far:action::waving:
 

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I'm with Plainmech I used Honda seals on mine.
 

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Hondas for me simply because they were easier to come across. I have used Pro-Molys on other motorcycles and had no problems with them either.
 

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Fenton.Dale wrote:
Looking for fork seals for my 84 GL1200. The last onesI bought didn't seemto last but a few miles. What has been the best fork seal on the Wing you ride? All input welcome.
OEMs or the Pro Moly Leak proof seals. One thing though.......if you have any pits on your tube uppers, file them and polish them with steel wool or fine grit sandpaper to take the edges off. If it's a bad pit, consider replacing the upper tubes.
 

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The life of fork seals is heavily influenced by other factors than the maker of the seals. The fork tubes MUST be clean and free from rust and pitting. Polish the fork tubes, if there's any pitting you can fill them with liquid metal, JB Weld or any metal filled epoxy filler. Then hand sand the repaired fork tubes with 800 or finer wet/dry paper used wet. Once the tubes are perfectly clean and smooth the next thing is installing the seal. It's critically important not to damage the fine lips on the seal while installing them. The seals should be coated with fork oil and the fork tubes wiped with fork oil prior to sliding the seals over them. Be very careful when slipping the seals over the ends of the fork tubes so the seal lips don't get stretched or cut. I installed EMGO seals in my1500's forks some 40,000 miles ago. They still keep the oil in and the dirt our as they are supposed to do. I've also installed them in two 1100s and one 1000 with no problem. Never got a gripe from their owners either so I assume they did the job.
 

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I've not long ago replaced mine. Aftermarket seals only seem to last a couple of years or less. This time I fitted Honda seals and bushes, no more leaks or flex in the forks.
 

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I've had good results with bikemaster from bike bandit.
 

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Anything but the leak proof #&*%.
 

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+1 for make sure the tubes are clean and nick-free. Any imperfections will destroy the seals in short order. If they only lasted a few miles, something else is wrong. What is a few miles? If you are talking one or two, could they be upside down? I've had a couple installed the wrong way, and they leak instantly. The raised letters on the seal should be up. It can be hard to see the writing as your eyes get older.. (wasn't me, but... ) If it was a few hundred miles, you almost certainly have a rough spot or a nick. Exavid has the process nailed.. good advice. Also, scottohio's suggestion to make sure the bushings are replaced is spot-on. Bushings are super cheap, and should be done every time you service the forks. For an 1800, you are talking $16 for the set OEM from a dealer.

The other question is: Are you operating in a dirty environment? Manufacturers used to put gaiters over the tubes to keep the crap out, but stopped, probably for styling reasons. Now dirt, grit, insect parts, whatever can get in there and harm the seals.

Dave
rocketmoto.com
 
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