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Has anyone here burned a clutch using a motor oil with friction modifiers?Or is this another wives tale?

I have used Synthetic Amsoil exclusively since 1981 with friction modifiers.

The bikes I have used it in since then are a:

1983 Yamaha Venture Sold at 32,+++ never a slippage.

1978 Suzuki gs1000 38,+++ never a slippage(turned into a race bike in 1981)

1979 Suzuki gs1000 19.+++ never a slippage

1980 gs1100e 12,+++ never a slippage

1984 gs1150e 16,+++ never a slippage

1986 honeda vfr 11,+++ never a slippage

1990 honda vfr750 9,+++ never a slippage

1993 Suzuki Intruder 1400 7,+++ never a slippage

1980 gs1000G the real keeper 94,+++used to slip a couple of times withing 300 miles of an oil change when revving high from 3rd to 5th gear.

Still have it still has original clutch and still works great.Once the oil got a little worn in it never hinted at slippage.



Now I have taken interest in the Old Goldwings and members are saying friction modifiers will burn your clutch up if you use an oil with them.

I always uses the 20/50 syntheticracing oil in all those from the day of there first oil change.

Im thinking this is just an old wives tale about the friction modifiers.

UNLESS Goldwings have some unusual makeup in there clutch plates and they are always on the verge of slipping and that little bit of friction modifier puts the clutchinto the spin zone.

I would love to hear your stories.Or the Amsoil Ive been using had no friction modifiers all along hence the one isolated instances with the GS1100G.



Where are the Myth Busters When you need them?



Flatfour



Flatfour.
 

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The clutch in the 1000 especially as they have aged is not terribly strong. I drive one of my bikes very hard and regurlarly experience slippage when power shifting 2nd-3rd and up.

I dont think it will hurt the clutch but I suspect you will have drivability issues. These clutches seldom wear out. Most I have pulled for slipping have had a hard glaze on them that when adressed with some fine sandpaper were just fine. I have yet to find one that was actually worn beyond specs.

If you have a product you believe in then try it. Worst case a clutch change is not terribly hard.
 

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I've been running Castrol synthetic 20/50 in mine, with an infusion of Slick50 high mileage formula every other oil change for about 70,000 miles now...Which is WAY long before I found out here that I wasn't supposed to do that.

I haven't noticed any issues with it, and I'm still on the stock clutch at 120,000+ miles
 

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I run NEO 10/30,10/40 or 20/50W full synthetic oil plus the NEOGard oil suplement,use it in all my vehicles,called them years ago about this since Honda uses a wet clutch, definitely made a difference in mileage and shifting qualities,years ago i poured the NEO Gard in,"crossed" my fingers and took off half expecting the clutch to start slipping,not the case,although a 1 oz in an auto trans will
wipe it out go figure
 

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I have always had a motorcycle or two. Since age 17. I could not afford to have someone fix them, had no manuals, had no knowledge, but did have tools, so I would just tear it apart and figure out how to fix it.

Used to just use regular ole car oil, whatever was on sale. Never had any clutch problems because of oil.

Most of the time when you go into a clutch the fiber plates will have a hard glaze on them. Takes a long time say 60,000 plus miles. (course sandpaper will take care of that)

Oil is oil is oil is oil and it all has products in it that cook down and coat to certain parts, with time.

The wording in the manuals we have in modern times usually says something like this:
The use of energy conserving oils MAY cause damage to the clutch, the key word is MAY cause......so even they do not know for sure.

Anyways I use Delo 400 or Mobile One 4T, both are energy conserving free........if I had not gotten involved in the mechanics of motorcycles I would still be a dummy. Some folks still think I am a dummy. :D

Kit
 

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This has to be the most overworked topic, with a ton of opinions, not many, mine included that matter. Follow manufactures recommendations & you can't go wrong. They specified a high detergent oil.

The weight of the oil will usually determine if there's anything in it that will adversely affect the clutch. Just about any 10-40/20-50 oil would be OK. If the jug doesn't have energy saving in the round label it should be OK.

I personnally stay away from any oil that is either not rated for motocycle use ( label MA ) or falls into the orignal S oil designation ( I think it was SG back then ). An current example of this type of oil would be Rotella 15-40 or similar diesel type oils.
 

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I am using Delo 400 LE, 15w-40 and my clutch and tranny seem to like it. The bike actually shifts smoother and quieter than with the Honda GN4. I change oil and filter at 3-4,000 miles.
 

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I read somewhere online about friction modifiers in oil and oil bath clutches and it stated that there has been no proof that the oil with the friction modifiers caused a clutch to slip and went on to say that if it did, who's to say the clutch wasn't ready to "give out" anyway?

As for synthetic oil in my vehicles, I run it in the atv's only. I use the Amsoil for atvs but will use Rotella T synthetic this time around....it's more "economical".

I use Rotella T dino in my Wing but may swith to Delo this time around being I have heard it praised on here. My 97 F150 with 177,000 miles has Shell 5w-30 in it and has had for the 8 years I have owned it. It uses no oil in between the 3,000 or 3 months oil change intervals......more like 3 months since I don't drive it much.
 

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From what I have read certain oils have high amount of molybendum [not sure if thats spelled right] like Redline brand oils. Their oil tends to be in the over 600ppm range, which is alot higher then most that are used for wings. That would make it a good choice for bikes where there is a separate fill for the motor and trans like a Harley, but may cause slipping if use in a wing.,,
 

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donnie hagan wrote:
I thought a lot of people ran Rotella 15-40, is this a bad choice?
It is what I run
 
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