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I just bought a 1984 Aspencade rode it once and it quit on me with a blown 30amp main fuse. The spare broke in my hands so I wired in a 30amp auto fuse and got home. The next morning I tried to start it and the battery was dead so I charged the battery. It started fine but after a short time the yellow wires started to smoke so I shut it off and found a manual to see where the yellow wire went to. Whew! Melted insulation clear up to the voltage regulator/rectifier which is burned out. It has a Shindengen SH 541-12 3.8. Does anyone know where I can get a voltage regulator/rectifier other than buying it from Honda? Is there anything I can do other than use a 12 gauge wire and solder and shrink tube all the way to the voltage regulator? Any and all help very much appreciated. Nezzy
 

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Why not get hold of a used one from a breakers yard? If you let us know what country you are from someone may be able to point you to the part you need.
 

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It is a regrettable thing to use any but the original regulator/rectifier. Go OEM Honda new or used. dont mess with aftermarket.

Check the Yellow wires with a DMM (resistance to each other and diode scale to Red and Green) into the regulator with ohmmeter and check the load side and see if a short shows up. May be a shorted rectifier. A 30 amp link melting could be from a bad connector, or a current overload. The connector on top of the solenoid is known for getting extremely hot.

Isolate the regulator and battery and test the rest of the system with another battery and ammeter to see what the draw is. This will isolate the primary charging system and load. I suspect its in the primary charging system unless you saw another similar cloud of smoke elsewhere in the motorcycle. Remove the 17mm cap behind the stator (left rear top of engine rear case) and sniff the insides, see if you smell smoke. That cap gives access to the inside of the stator.

Also be careful to not get fooled by a shorted battery. That one will really make you:crying::crying::crying:It may whack the new regulator. All that needed to destroy a regulator diode is a temporary short inside the battery.


Use 14 gauge stranded wire, 600V insulation, automotive wire if availiable to replace the burnt wires.

Then wonder if the stator has got fried. Realize any current that can melt that insulation could toast the stator. Be prepared for a $300-400 parts bill on this one.
 

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I would agree with Dave on this, especially since the Gold Wing alternator is a brushless type. You need the exact calibrations that Honda originally dialed into the regulator. If your stator is fried you don't necessarily have to spend hundreds of dollars to repair it, you can upgrade to a high output automotive alternator that is much more relible than the stock Honda item. Let me know if you need more info on this.

Vic
 

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Vic, the external alternator (auto) sounds like a great idea. Whatever it takes to install has to be less expensive than possibly pulling the engine and installing a new stator although the stator checks out ohmwise at the moment. However, the melted insulation on the yellow wires indicates it took a strong hit and could go at any time. I would suppose the auto alternator would have a higher amperage output than the Honda alternator at the same RPM which is a definite PLUS. I'm definitely interesed in going this route Vic,but I have to admit you'll have to take me by the hand and lead me thru the change over. I can only hope you're up th the task of helping this old codger. Nez
 

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Dave, thanks for the reply. I'm leaning toward the external auto alternator suggested by Vic. The Honda alternator took quite a whack obviously with the melted wires and although it checks out OK ohmwise now,who knows what will happen somewhere down the road. I'll definitely need a lot of info from Vic before I go down the auto alternator route tho. I'd be interested to know how you check for a shorted battery. Nez
 

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Shorted battery is hard to find, it may be from a lead flake between plates. Considering whats happened, Id replace the battery.


With the aid of Gates Engineering,I offer this advice on external alternators driven from cam belts (I assume its off the cam). This risks a broken belt and engine damage.

beware of external alternators driven from the cam belt, the belt is at the point of being overloaded at low speeds by the addition of the alternator load depending on camshaft horsepower.

Unless the kit was designed by a Mechanical engineer or a very good mech designer that can calculate cam torque (a difficult thing to do that requires Calculus) , that "L" series belt might be overloaded on idle and break. Just becauseit hooks up and works electrically and mechanically doesnt mean it wont breaka timing belt.

Any such mod requires calculating belt tension (again, not easy) and changing the idler spring to compensate so the belt tension is proper to handle the additional horsepower load.

If this has been taken into consideration and calcs have been done to verify the belt wont break, and water cant get into the belt cases, then go for it. Electrically the bike wont care.
 

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Nezzy, you'll be just fine if you run the conversion alternator from the crankshaft. It's safe, been proven to be extremely reliable and is sooooooo easy to repair if it ever fails on the road.

Email me at [email protected] and I'll point you in the right direction if you choose to go with the conversion alternator.

Vic
 
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