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I am rebuilding my front brake and noticed that on one calliper, the pads were worn at an angle as one piston was not moving properly. Is this just lack of maintenance (seized piston) or could there be a fault here?

Also, does anyone know how essential it is to use silicone grease on the sliding pins/rubber boots? I realise oil based grease will shorten the life of the boot, but these should be replaced fairly often anyhow. Is there any functional or safety reason we cannot use copper grease here?

I have no issue with the rear brake as my bike is a trike....... its bettter on 3 wheels than it ever was on 2:cool:
 

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Ho Bloke and welcome to the forum if the piston stuck it would through off the centering of it as it may be stuck on one side only, now your brake disc is most likely the same so when you fit new pads they will go the same way you need to mesure the disc thickness it should be 5mm at least if lower replace it and no prob useing the copper greese on the pins
 

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HI Peter, thanks for the advice, the discs are both fine, I think like you, it is just that with one piston moving OK and the other not, this has caused pads to wear on the slant. It had just gone back to metal on that side too, but not the other one, which has even wear and much more friction material left on the pads. So I guess the pads were at least partially seized with the stuck piston. This would account for the amount of friction material worn away too.

I have new pistons, pads, shims, pad and calliper pins, rubber boots all round. I think the only original parts left will be the hoses and callipers as the discs were replaced recently (Oct 2008). Hopefully once I have it all back greased up and moving nicely, if I service the callipers every 12 months all I should replace then is (periodically) the pads I guess. I thought copper grease would be OK on the sliding calliper pins, but as I've never delved this far into a disc brake, I thought I ought to get a second opinion. I used to be a bit scared of disc brakes but now I have these apart, I realise they are quite simple.

My next issue is the master cylinder, which now drives both slaves as there is no disc on the rear (this is a Ford Sierra drum set up on my trike). The front master cylinder is only designed to drive the one calliper, as I am sure you will know, so I would like to find a bigger master which will fit the current standard GL 1500 lever and handlebar set up. I'm wondering if a Valkyrie (F6?)variant might fit here, any ideas?

Cheers, James.
 

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Did you also service the two Slide PIns (Items 12 & 13 below), that enable the caliper to move side-to-side?.. If not, then that lack of movement would cause abnormal pad wear.

 

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I dont know that the F6 is bigger but as you only need more fluid capacity if you get another container off ebay ect does not have to be off a goldwing another honda make should do you can cut a section out to add on topof your one with a home made gasket and longer cap screws you may need to get it cut in a machine shop with a milling machine to get a flat surface for a good seal the photo is a switch box that adds on top of the original but you get the picture

 

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the front master is designed to move fluid for one caliper . In your case with the trike I suppose the brakes have been unlinked . In that case , yes I would look for a caliper from a bike that did not have a linked system . You now need a master designed to move enough fluid volume to actuate two calipers . The Valkyrie master may be the ticket . I would look at the angle it mounts on the handle bars to see if the reservior would be near level once mounted on the Wing bars .
 

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Can you advise , minimum thickness of brake discs
Welcome to the forum jajo01
As you can see the two responses after you tagged on your question to this 2 yr old thread the responses are to the first poster as they didn't read the date either. You would always be better served to get your answer by starting a new topic, include all info as to year and model of the bike in question, and be as specific as possible so we have all the facts to give a good answer or you will be asked to elaborate much more.
Do that and see what the results will be.
By the way, that answer is in the repair manual. You might find the minimum thickness by using the search tool minimum rotor thickness (add your model-1500?)-front or rear.

Hopefully these guys will learn to read the date before clicking and read through the whole thread, LOL. Luv you guys! (And yes I've done it too in haste not reading the date under the listing.)
 

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And minimum is stamped on all rotors.
 

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You could check California Sidecar here in the states. Their trike kits make both front calipers work off the front master cylinder like yours. Part of the kit installation is to strip and send them the original master cylinder and they modify it to work better controlling both calipers. I have first hand experience with this mod and it works well. If you don't mind shipping your master cylinder 'over the pond', you could give them a call and price it out.
 

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Dizzy
You need to look at dates and read through all the posts before replying.
 
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