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With all the maintenance I have been doing on my bike, I am wondering if I did the timing belt adjustment correctly. I changed out the belts a couple weeks ago and have since put more than 1200 miles on the bike. This morning on my way to work it seems I can hear whining from that area.

I am not exactly sure what timing belt whining or singing sounds like, but something is whining. I haven't really noticed it in the past 1200 miles, but I haven't really paid attention either. Wind noise seems to hide a lot.

So my question is, I have been hearing this more pronounced at speed, 50-60mph. I know these bikes are whiney anyways but this is different. If this is timing belt whine, should the whine change with rpm? If I am sitting in a parking lot and rev the engine, should I hear it change? It seems to be speed dependent and not really RPM dependent. However at idle, it seems to whine a little as well.

Probably dig into it tonight again since it doesn't take long to take it apart. Followed Rudy's instructions for the install, but the belts felt really tight when installing. I am not sure I could get the full half inch slack needed. I adjusted it cold, should I do the adjustment when its warm? Tensioners seemed fine.

Thanks
 

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More speed dependent (and not consistantly rpm dependent) points directly to tires (not timing belts).. is it worse when you lean??

and after 1200 miles the belts would have already relaxed themselves even if they were initially over-tightened...
 

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After riding home from work, that is what I am kind of thinking as well. Trying to isolate the noise and listen more carefully. I think it is the tire whine people complain about when tires are starting to cup. Not much for corners around here so hard to tell at lean.

It does seem to be worse when slowing down from 50-30mph ish. Thats when I can hear it the most. Does this mean new tire time? Or just put up with the annoying sound time?
 

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sandiegobrass wrote:
...and after 1200 miles the belts would have already relaxed themselves even if they were initially over-tightened...
Not necessarily. The tensioners can take a few hundred miles before the strain of over-tightening starts to become audible.
 

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The required Tension on the belts is very small... Local mechanic showed me his technique, of Twisting the belt with fingers until it deflects (twists) just shy of 90-degrees... If you can't do that then it's too tight; if it deflects further then it's too loose.

Another way to look at it is that the Spring Tensioners, weak as they are, actually provide the full tension required during installation... eg You don't need to pull (tension) the belts beyond the force that they require --I did mine over 3x, going looser each time, until just the spring tension was being used... and the noise went away.
 

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Get it up to speed and let off the gas and pull in the clutch, if the noise stops it is the timing belts if the noise is still there it is the tires. If you have dunlop 3s on it I would say it is the tires. I have dunlop 3s on mine and the front tire sounds like it is a snow tire. MossWing
 

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How do I know for sure if it is the belts or tire noise? If I don't have to rip it apart again I don't want to. It is not that much fun.
 

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If it's the belts, then you can test it at Idle in neutral... eg Rev the engine up to 2-3k rpm, the point at which the belts typically whine. You should easily be able to hear it, it that's the source.
 

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mosswing wrote:
Get it up to speed and let off the gas and pull in the clutch, if the noise stops it is the timing belts if the noise is still there it is the tires. If you have dunlop 3s on it I would say it is the tires. I have dunlop 3s on mine and the front tire sounds like it is a snow tire. MossWing
It doesn't go away when I pull in the clutch. So I am guessing it is the tire. I have a new E3 rear and and older Bridgestone on the front. It has a lot of meat left but does show beginning stages of cupping.
 

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ALEX BERECZKY wrote:
If it's the belts, then you can test it at Idle in neutral... eg Rev the engine up to 2-3k rpm, the point at which the belts typically whine. You should easily be able to hear it, it that's the source.

Ok good to know. I don't hear it at 2-3 in neutral. Only riding. So I am leaning toward tire wear. Man these bikes are hard to figure out.
 

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GWNorman wrote:
sandiegobrass wrote:
...and after 1200 miles the belts would have already relaxed themselves even if they were initially over-tightened...
Not necessarily. The tensioners can take a few hundred miles before the strain of over-tightening starts to become audible.

Okay.. if the tensioners were old and very bad already that could happen, but good tensioners will not failjust because of tight belts..

What I was referring to was.... every set of belts that I have put on, are on the tight side (compared to what others describe here) and after inspection acouple thousand mileslater the belts are quite loose and they stay that way.. (the tensioners do not change)

And like I said in my first post.. the symptoms point directly to tire noise, so I don't know why we are beating on the subject oftiming belts.
 

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I agree with Jim here. And it should be easy to test.

Take the bike to a relatively quiet street and drive it in second gear, approximating the RPM you would experience at road speed and listen for the noise.
 

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cory1848,

I had the same issue this summer and it starts out fine when start to ride then the after everything warms up then I would get this whining noise. It would start around 30mph and get little worse at higher speed. Mine came out to be the speedo cable. I took it off the wheel sprocket and turned the cable with screw driver and was very stiff. Took the inner cable out and it took abit to get it out and I cleaned cable and housing and lubricated cable and put it back in and the whine went away. So this winter I will completely replace the speedo cable and harnest. I hope this helps you out.
 

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Hey Cory
it dusnt sound like the tensioners. could be many things.Could be from tranny or clutch front or back wheel bearings speedo cable etc. noises on a bike or any auto can seem like they come from one end but may infact come from the other.
Wilf
 

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Ditto sandie , " new E3 rear " ... good tire but whine like crazy on deceleration .
Try to determine if the sound is coming from front or rear and when ?
Suspect the new E3 is doing its normal " what the hell is that " whine.
 
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