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Can anyone clear up and arguement we are having at work. After replacing my water pump I was expecting my temp to go down a couple of notches but it didn't. I stated I thought my carbs were running to lean and it was causing it to run a little hot. The guys at work say a too rich mixture will cause it to run hotter. Can someone settle this for us? From looking at the plugs (somewhat white not light brown) I would say I was a little lean. Bike runs great other than a little warmer than I would like (6 bars instead of 4 on the digital gauge) Bike is an 84 Aspy. Thanks guys
 

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You will run much hotter with a lean setting. I have seen bikes and cars with red hot exhaust from lean conditions. That could even cause burned valves and, in a worse case scenerio, distort a cylinder head over time. Of course, it does not sound like you are even close to that. You may want to richen your carbs, following the manufacturers instructions. Maybehave them balanced afterwards. I would even change the plugs again after doing these adjustments. The white color of your plugs indicate that the cylinders are running lean and hot. A tannish color would show a decent fuel/air mixture, black would be rich.

A rich condition is caused from too much fuel and not enough air whichwill not burn cleanly and produces high amounts of Carbon Monoxide. The black soot is the incomplete combustion of the gas and does not cause over-heating. Hope this helps!
 

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Hockeydad, the guys at work are wrong. As Wendell said lean mixtures burn hotter. In fact with high performance 2 stroke engines the carbs are set up to go extra rich at full throttle as part of keeping the engine from overheating. The Rotax 582 two stroke used in Ultra lights does that, the extra fuel keeps the cylinder head and exhaust gas temp in the safe range when calling for full throttle take off and climb. In Ultralight serviceengines are operated under a much higher load than ground machinery so the extra cooling becomes a big factor.
 

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You may need a new "Radiator" cap!

It controls the flow of the water! Cheap too!

Go to The tip page for a Stant Rad Cap you buy from auto parts store, I think it's a 12 to 14 psi?:baffled:
 

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Thanks guys, I thought I was right and you guys backed me up. Just had the carbs adjusted and synced. That is when it started running hotter. Took it back to the dealer who did the work and they said everything was set up correctly. Guess now I am going to have to learn to set the air-fuel mixture and sync carbs. A couple of more months of this learning and I can start a new business. LOL.Any suggestions on the proper tecnique for setting the air-fuel mixture?
 

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There's a lot of info on the forum about setting the carbs, do a search in the box above. I'd imagine the air bleed screws might need a bit of a tweak. If the bike is running well and not hesitating of flat spotting it's probably not far off. I wouldn't expect changing a water pump to have any effect on the engine temperature. A failing Goldwing pump normally just leaks and or allows come of the coolant to contaminate the oil or vice versa.The water volume pumped isn't usually affected. If you don't have one, it's really worth getting a Honda or Clymer manual for your bike.
 

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hockeydad33 wrote:
Thanks guys, I thought I was right and you guys backed me up. Just had the carbs adjusted and synced. That is when it started running hotter. Took it back to the dealer who did the work and they said everything was set up correctly. Guess now I am going to have to learn to set the air-fuel mixture and sync carbs. A couple of more months of this learning and I can start a new business. LOL.Any suggestions on the proper technique for setting the air-fuel mixture?
hockeydad33, your carbs would have to really out of whack to effect the engine operating temperature. About the only things adjustable on those carbs only effect low speed running. The power band & load pulling parts of the carb are non-adjustable. If the idle (pilot) circuit (pilot needles) were set too lean you would have a very poor running engine (especially cold) & it would pop & backfire as you gave it throttle. IF, the carbs were grossly out of sync it would run poorly at low throttle settings. As the carbs are opened more for road speed the sync becomes much less of an issue as the throttle plate openings are much larger there so sync differences have little effect.

A lot of modern automobiles (& trucks) have algorithms in the software to allow what is called fuel cooling. If the PCM sees a rise in coolant temperature it alters the fuel/air ratio to go rich & fuel cool the combustion chambers due to fuel evaporation & altered combustion. I have seen some that would go as rich as (10 or 11 to 1) A/F under heavy loads in hot weather.

On your running hotter problem? Make sure your radiator is not covered with dirt & bugs & that the fins aren't bent,, make sure the air flow isn't blocked by accessories or fender mud flaps. Make sure the antifreeze/water mixture isn't far from 50/50% (too much antifreeze will cool poorly).. Make sure the radiator hoses aren't pinched or twisted that restricts coolant flow.

It's also possible your engine is operating at the correct temperature but the gauge is reading incorrectly. You might try removing the temperature sender unit, then grounding it's base to the engine block with a wire,then placing it in a can of boiling (212°) water & checking the gauge reading.

Remember as the outside ambient temperature raises so will the engine temperatures so riding in real hot weather will show on the dash gauge.



From looking at the plugs (somewhat white not light brown) I would say I was a little lean. Bike runs great other than a little warmer than I would like (6 bars instead of 4 on the digital gauge)
Those 1200 Wings tend to have white plugs even when set correctly due to the lean burn of the engine for emission & fuel economy reasons. My personal 1200 will have pure white plugs even after 10,000 miles on the plugs & I only show 3 bars on the temp gauge even at 95 mph. If your bike is running lean it will run very poorly especially at launch & throttle up at 30-40 mph.


Guess now I am going to have to learn to set the air-fuel mixture and sync carbs. A couple of more months of this learning and I can start a new business. LOL.Any suggestions on the proper technique for setting the air-fuel mixture?
If you want to fool with your low speed fuel air ratio- start by counting the turns to seated on ALL FOUR carb pilot needles, write that down so you can set it back if needed.. They should probably be in the neighborhood of 2-1/2 - 3 turns out from seated if near correct.. Try setting them to 3-1/2 turns out from seated & see if that effects your low speed temperature or runability. Watch your fuel economy & if it gets down to 32-35 mpg you are set too rich.

A little more to think about- The early 1200 Wings had a service bulletin issued to re-calabrate the carbs for a poor running condition (they came too lean just off-idle). I don't remember the exact details but it involved different slide springs, different carb metering rods, & slightly richer pilot jets.

Twisty
 

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Running extremely rich is what keeps Top Fuel and Funny Car dragsters cool. They have no cooling and the super rich mixture keeps the engine cooler.

Raymond
 

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Tony, I agree. As a matter of fact I am not going to worry about it right now and I am just going to ride and enjoy.I will change the radiator cap just to be on the safe side and then just relax. Thanks for all the input, I really do appreciate it alot.
 

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If your radiator cap isn't leaking or blowing off steam, there's not much else it can do, I'd leave it alone. A weak spring can cause one to valve offbefore it reaches the set pressure, but this is usually pretty obvious.
 

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Exavid, you talked me into it since it doesn't really seem bad. I am on my way to ride even though it is like a blast furnace here. I know, not as hot as some other places but I can take the cold better than the heat. I can add enough clothes to get warm but I can't take off enough to get cool with out embarassing myself or going to jail. Be good or be careful.
 

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hockeydad33, what is the ambient air temperature in your area? My 84 Aspy runs at either 5 bars or 6 bars depending on city/highway driving. The ambient air temperature is in the higher 90's. When the ambient temperature is in the 70's and low 80's, it runs at 4 bars and up to 5 bars.

I don't think you have anything to worry about.
 

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1984gl1220a, the temp around here has been in the mid ninety with a heat index of about 100 and it runs at 6 bars in town or on the highway. When the temp gets down in the low 80's it seems to run at 5 sometimes 4 bars. From theinfo inyour post I think I will put my mind to rest. Whatever mind I have left. I guess I was being too picky or cautious.
 

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I don't think that you have any problems. It sounds like it is running about the same as mine.

I am planning on adding a set of wind wings to direct some air in behind the fairing to help with the heat build-up around my legs. That seems to be my only complaint with the high operating temperature.
 

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I hate the look of windwings, but the damn things work pretty well. I find they help in the winter and summer. I'd recommend clear one, they aren't so conspicuous as the colored ones even if the colors match the bike. My bike has Baker Wings, they are pretty sturdy things, when the asphalt gave way under my side stand this spring, the bike went down all the way onto the mirror and wind wing. Other than some small scratches on the lower edge of the mirror no damage done, didn't even bend the wing mounting arms. They really help bringing a breeze in when it's hot and they keep the cold off. Also seem to keep some of the rain from coming in from the sides.
 
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