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I need to remove the fuel tank on my GL1500 to clean it (badly rusted). I followed all of the instructions in the Clymer manual (removed the rear wheel, fender, fuse panel, etc) and it does not clear the swing arms (mainly the mount for the bottom shock bolt). Any suggestions? :baffled:
 

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latest update. I removed the bottom retaining bolt on both shocks and got the swing arm to drop enough to clear the retainers. Now I can't get it past the final driven gear housing. Easy enough to remove (4 bolts). Any suggestions before I go this far? PS. Also had to remove the starter to get the front of the tank to drop enough to raise the rear of the tank to clear the bottom shock bolt retainers. :baffled:
 

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I've never had the tank out of a 1500 but removing the tank from a couple of 1100s required removing just about everything but the swing arm if I remember right. Sounds to me like you're on the right track.
 

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I got the tank out after removing the final driven gear housing and some light coaxing with a rubber mallet. Hardly any dings/damage to the tank other than a few light scratches. I don't care what the manual says I don't see how the tank can be removed without removing the final driven gear with out beating the crap out of the tank. In short my remedy to remove the tank is as follows:



  1. 1. Remove the rear wheel, rear fender and final driven gear housing.
  2. 2. remove the relay box on the left side of the bike
  3. 3. remove the battery and battery box.
  4. 4. remove all fuel hoses, spill tray, etc.
5. be careful not to pinch/damage any wires. Move any wires out of the way. You will have to remove some of them from thier retaining clips.



With a rubber mallet or dead blow hammer gently tap on the tankto get it out. The tank comes out from the rear of the bikebetween the swing arms.





Hope this helps future members looking to remove their tank.



In all took me about 2 hours.
:doh:
 

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It's often been compared to the bike giving birth, that really isn't far off. It takes a lot of juggling to get the thing out even when everything is out of the way. The first time I removed one I forgot to remove the petcock, I wasted half an hour trying to pull that tank out until I noticed the petcock. Duh! Oh well, that's how you learn.
 

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I replaced my fuel tank because I got tired of replacing them small clogging fuel filters.

I did not remove the swing arm, but one side of the shocks needs to be free.

Also, above the center exhaust collector cover, remove the relays and brackets. This will give the gas tank a little more room when it slides out.

I did remove the drive hub and shaft because it was in the way, but I can not remember if it was really necessary. I think it had to come out.

What a pain. I flipped a Yamaha XS Special, and the fuel tank flew off.Only one bolt that I forgot toinstall. Tank could be removed in 2 seconds and that includes unlatching the seat.
 

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that's an accurate analogy. It was like a baby coming out of the bike!:D
 

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I oredered the Kreem 3 part kit for cleaning and sealing the tank. Anyone use this before? I'm going to get as much of the rust as possible out using some nuts/bolts and muratic acid.



Also the fuel pump looks to be in pretty bad shape. Any suggestions how I should clean it up? The screen is really dirty/rusty as well as the bracket.
 

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I ordered the Kreem 3 part kit for cleaning and sealing the tank. Anyone use this before? I'm going to get as much of the rust as possible out using some nuts/bolts and muratic acid.



Also the fuel pump looks to be in pretty bad shape. Any suggestions how I should clean it up? The screen is really dirty/rusty as well as the bracket.
 

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Make sure you follow the directions to the letter on the Kreem. You do not want that coating to fail or you will have lots of problems as it plugs you're fuel system.
 

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tallyho wrote:
Any suggestions how I should clean it up? The screen is really dirty/rusty as well as the bracket.
One of the best ways to clean up a tank is to take it to a radiator shop, they use a lot stronger acids than you can buy commercially.
 

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I have had 2 done professionally now. My Radiator shop uses Red Kote. It is a polymer (sp?) and is basically impervious to just about anything when cured. Cost a hundred and a half but the tanks will out live me.
 

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I looked into having it done professionally and the cost wasn't woth it asa new tank runs $177. I've done some research and it seems to be that the most common cause of the failure of the coating is not getting all of the rust out. Another option I thought about is just cleaning it and not putting on the sealer. This would be no different than a stock tank. Am I missing something?
 

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tallyho wrote:
Another option I thought about is just cleaning it and not putting on the sealer. This would be no different than a stock tank. Am I missing something?
I don't think you are. The bigest problem with stock tanks is people putting their bikes to bed with less than a full tank of gas. That lets condensation develope then rust follows. Flash rust is almost unavoidable but if a tank is kept full when parked it will lastfor decades.
 

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I wouldn't use a sealer. If all goes well a sealer will help but if there's a problem with adherence the stuff will flake forever. If you can get it clean enough so that rust particles aren't plugging the filter that should be good enough. As already mentioned it's an empty tank that rusts. Avoiding condensation accruing in fuel tanks is one reason most aircraft are parked with full tanks. Aircraft also have sump drains to rid them of water which would be nice on bikes too. It's surprising how much water is in the air, you can drain an air compressor tank and after a bit of use the the tank accumulates more water.
 

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Thanks for the input guys. I think I will take your advise, clean the tank and reinstall without the sealer. On another note any comments on how to restore the pump? Can I buy parts (strainer, etc)? Thanks again.
 

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I've seen an article online, don't remember if it was on this forum or not but someone rebuilt a 1500 pump using an automotive pump adapted to the 'Wing's pump assemlby which was apparently a lot cheaper. Probably someone with a better memory around here will jump in with the URL.
 

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Thanks Mike, I just drew a blank last night on where I'd seen it. Too late to hunt for it and I knew some astute member would have the info. I downloaded the .pdf this time as I should have the first time.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
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I purchased a used tank from a 97 GL1500 on ebay for $71.00. Also included the pump and fuel guage sender. Tank is very clean. :action:
 
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