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Anyone got a good way of getting the rust out of a 'wing tank? Ive got a '75 1000 with what appears to be surface rust inside. I tried the 3 step TANK KREEM product and was severly dissapointed. The first step didn't even work so I didnt bother with the next 2 and I'm out $50 now :X. What I've been told to do instead follows (the tank is removed btw)

1. pourmuriatic acid in tank diluted with water

2. let sit untill rust is gone

3. Baking soda to neutralize acid

4. rinse tank out and let dry

A couple things... isnt puttin baking soda in this stuff gonna react severely? How do I get the tank to dry quickly enough so it doesnt rust again after? What about pouring the stuff out and then rinsing the tank with a baking soda and water mixture?

tell me what u guys think...
 

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never heard of this technigue, but I would pour out the acid before ading the baking soda.... be prepared for lots of foam!
 

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Hi Resto

I have a 1981GL 1100 that had rust real bad. This is top secretebut this is what work for me.

1> Remove the tank (Boy you are fast at that)

2> Go to Walmart,Kmart, or Sporting good store and buy about pint of real steal BBs

not the plastic ones:D

3> Go to a auto paint store and get what is called (metal prep) about a quart.

4> Pour the metal prep,and BBs into tank, close the cap, and petcock (Keep tank from leaking the metal prep)

5>Shake the tank like there is no tomorrow ( I use You ain't nothing but a hound dog by Elvis):dude:for about three to five minutes

6> Pour out the metal prep and BBs into a bowl (Just in case you what to repeat stepFourand Five) If need to repeat do it now. Before continuing.

7> Remove Gas cap and fuel gauge sender.

8>Put Garden hose in tank and flush out about four to five minutes

9>Use air compressor to dry the inside of tank. (Or exhaust form automobile)

10>Install the tank and ride safealso keep the tank full of gas when not in use. (use fuel stab)

That is what worked for me:grinner:

Good luck and Have a safe day

Baja65/Fred K.
 

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Yamaha has a product available to clean tanks that works great, two step product.

I don't remember the P/N off the top of my head, it's been 20 years since I worked in a shop, but I think it's ACC-11001-44-00.

I'll check some sources and see if that's the number, price and so forth.
 

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All the solutions presented thus far are good. In the past when I was restoring vintage wood working machinery I used this cleaner called "The Must for Rust" got it at home depot. It contains Phosphoric acid which does an ion exchange that grabs up the oxygen in rust (Ferric & Ferrous Oxide) and coverts the rust into black iron phosphate. Unbelievable stuff though kinda smelly. Leaves the metal kinda textured which helps the coating bond to it (Kreem & other kits). Some radiator shops use this stuff. Muriatic acid is very agressive so be careful. Muriatic acid will convert the steel in your tank into Ferric(Iron) Chloride. Phosphoric, a weak acid attacks the rust and leave the steel unscathed.

The BB's are good but I like to use hard steel nuts (as in nuts & bolts). They have more mass and sharp edges so they are more apt to abraid the surface. The ideal thing to use and I will be trying it on my tank next month is Alumina stones. You can get this at a rock shop. They are little stones or triangles that are just like sand paper in stone form. The use them in vibratory polishers. I believe they come in different grits just like sand paper.

From Wikepedia:

Rust removal Phosphoric acid may be used by direct application to rusted iron or steel tools or surfaces to convert iron(III) oxide (rust) to a water soluble phosphate compound. It is usually available as a greenish liquid, suitable for dipping (acid bath), but is more generally used as a component in a gel, commonly called Naval jelly. As a thick gel, it may be applied to sloping, vertical, or even overhead surfaces. Care must be taken to avoid acid burns of the skin and especially the eyes, but the residue is easily diluted with water. When sufficiently diluted can even be nutritious to plant life, containing the essential nutrients phosphorus and iron. It is sometimes sold under other names, such as "rust remover" or "rust killer". It should not be directly introduced into surface water such as creeks or into drains, however. After treatment, the reddish-brown iron oxide will be converted to a black iron phosphate compound that may be scrubbed off. Multiple applications may be required to remove all rust. The resultant black compound can provide further corrosion resistance (such protection is somewhat provided by the superficially similar Parkerizing process). After application and removal of rust using phosphoric acid compounds the metal should be oiled (if to be used bare, as in a tool) or appropriately painted, most durably by using a multiple coat process of primer, intermediate, and finish coats.
 

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I trid a lot of the methods mentioned here... wasn't very happy and took my tank to the local radiator shop. They did a super job in cleaning the tank. It cost $35.00 US. You might consider it....Good luck
 

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Hey guys

Thanks for all the ideas. Ill try a couple and see what happens. I actually originally did try to take it to a rad shop 10anthony10 down the street and got the run around so I just assumed that would be the answer everywhere but since you did find a place, maybe i'll call some other places...

Cheers (unless ur ridin')
 

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The radiator shop sounds like a real good idea, you'll have to paint the tank afterwards and I guess remove all hardware brfore having it dipped.
 

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My tank was not dipped, it was only washed on the inside. The outside paint was intact. After the wash the inside was sealed. I was very pleased. Anthony
 

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I've tried using radiator shops on some of my other bike projects. I think they use a product called Red Cote (?). The one thing you should ask them is whether they blow air through the petcock to keep the screens clear, otherwise they will be coated too.

While waiting for a tank at a local shop I notice drums of Phosphoric acid and Sodium citrate powder. The latter is used with radiators for descaling. Whats good about their operation is that their baths are hot so the work quickly and effectively. They time the exposure so that not too much metal is removed. One guy was doing the shake clean using roofing nails and a pressure washer.

Here in California they charge over $100 for the service and up depending where you go.
 
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