Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 45 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,287 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
imported post

You guessed it ...manifolds...

Anyone have experience and dataabout the affects of using PVC and gasoline together?

Not wanting to have this turn into Chem 101, but personal experiences and knowledge aquired is the aim.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
170 Posts
imported post

isn't gas cans made from the same material just thinner?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,299 Posts
imported post

The PVC may hold up to gas, but the question is will the glue hold up or dissolve? Also would vibration cause the joints to leak?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,797 Posts
imported post

Good questions.

Maybe I'll cut off a small piece with some glue on it and let in soak in gas for awhile.
From what I've read there hasnt been a problem yet.

I wonder too if the PVC and glue are hot if they'd react differently under a fuel air environment under a vacuum.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,287 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
imported post

I believe Polyethylene is what most plastic gas cans are made of g4e.

I have found a post where someone has done some testing:
http://www.spudfiles.com/spudtech_archive/viewtopic.php?t=7896

I've got my own testing underway.
I've thought about the glue issue and am still researching it. Testing to follow.
There is a PVC hot-glue method, though I'm unfamiliar with it.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
27,942 Posts
imported post

What kind of "plastic" is it that a lot of automotive intake manifolds are made from? Some kind of PVC or ABS, I don't know.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,287 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,287 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
imported post

Again, not wanting to go too technical, but this is of interest:
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
427 Posts
imported post

Not sure exactly what you are using it for, but Permatex puts out a couple kinds of sealers for use in fuel enviorments. One takes a hard set and one remains flexible. Both can usually be found at NAPA.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,287 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
imported post

I've found that PVC "glue" or "cement" is a marketing term only.

PVC glues and cements are actually "bonding solvents" that create a chemical "weld" of the two joints that are being joined together. It melts the two pieces together. There would be no residue left for gasoline to attack aside from the PVC itself.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,797 Posts
imported post

There is also a PVC primer which I'm told by a plumber "melts" the PVC to promote a better bond. The primer is applied before the glue
As an electrician I glue gray PVC and have had that bond separate, I guess the primer is suppose to prevent that.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,287 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
imported post

Primer/Cleaner (the purple stuff) then the Solvent. Once assembled, your not gonna seperate 'em. You'll break it trying.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,797 Posts
imported post

What can be used on the PVC joints to get a good strong airtight seal?
In fitting PVC conduit I work with they slide together with couplings and fittings, my holes in the plenum wont be that tight fitting.
Is there a gas resistant epoxy or hard curing sealer that would also bond solidly to the PVC that would seal the joint as well as make it stronger, like something I could smear in the joint sorta like caulking?
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

Most of the red gasoline cans or jerry jugs you see are made of polyethylene not polyvinyl chloride. PVC cement is what should be used to join pieces of PVC, epoxy won't make nearly as strong a bond. Check out the link below for some empirical testing of gasoline on PVC pipe.

http://www.spudfiles.com/spudtech_archive/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7896
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,287 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
imported post

Dan, using the normal, store bought PVC "cements" (the purple/primer can and the gold/solvent can) will give a permanent, air/water tight seal. Many pressurized air and water systems use just the standard cements (solvents) for assembly.

With the amount of couplings and the relatively short runs of straight pieces, is there a need for further reinforcing? This stuff is quite strong....
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,287 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,287 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
imported post

I'm learning that there is many, manydifferent types and grades of PVC. I'll be assembling all of my notes and posting them in sections soon. Looks as if PVC would be a good choice for manifold material.
 

·
Anti-Guru
Joined
·
2,711 Posts
imported post

CaptainMidnight85 wrote:
I'm learning that there is many, manydifferent types and grades of PVC. I'll be assembling all of my notes and posting them in sections soon. Looks as if PVC would be a good choice for manifold material.
If you can keep it from heating - PVC should be rated to soften at/above 175*F -- the shaper I use canbe set to heat at 260*F, but I find that 220*F is usually enough (like 5 minutes soak on a 4" PVC pipe). Once heated, the PVC pipe can be shaped with very little force, and some amount of attention needs to be paid to not crush the ID/OD of the pipe.



Knowing that hot-soak tempscan extend into where PVC softens, you may want to look more at CPVC --- You can still work with solvent welding (joining), but would have a higher soften/flow temperature. The drawback there is that the CPVC becomes more rigid so wall thicknes could be more of an issue to ensure that nothing cracked on ya.



Of course, good thermal isolation would help to reduce the amount of heat that could be directly conducted, so you'd only need to address the radiant heat values.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,111 Posts
imported post

One thing I might add is PVC could also be used as a model if youplaned to use another type of material like steel, aluminum, etc,.... :waving::waving:Bob
 
1 - 20 of 45 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top