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PVC tubing,

I had to buy all types of materials and I needed to get familiar many types of products plastics are one area. What I know could fill a thimbleful, I don't claim to be an expert, or even some to look to for answers. Just someone who has spent a little time with it.

Well, I can see why you picked PVC, it has good chemical resistance, so your good there.

There are different types of PVC,

type I Good corrosion/chemical resistance lower impact vibration resistance used as an electrical Insulator, or fluid transfer pipe, water, air

type II same as type I but has a high impact resistance as well, higher tensile strength so you no longer have a material that can easily crack, due to vibration or temp as type-II is good for -50 to +140F deg.

CPVC is a high temp version of PVC operating temp +0F to + 200F used as chemical Processing & metal finishing, it is fairly tough a higher hardness than Type-I

My experience using the type 1 PVC tubing, putting in water pipes, The cement makes an air tight seal melting the two pieces into one.

I used type-1 pipe to run air lines in my shop and I run 130-PSI compressed air to run air tools all the time.

Westgl
 

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CaptainMidnight85 wrote:
Big Cahuna wrote:
I was thinking...
BC, PVC comes in many different formulas, and can be formulated in many different ways. It is a plastic whose properties con be tailored. Standard s40 plumbingPVC piecesare sufficient to use as manifolds for our bikes.
Crayola Crayons and their 64 colors could be given as a example of the many different types of "PVC", but 64 is a fraction of the true number of possibilities.

Manycharacteristics of s40 PVC are comparable to the characteristics of a standard grade ABS mix, such as that used in my Vetter fairing. Type 1 schedule 40 PVC is stronger than standard black ABS plastic in all respects, but comparable. My plastic ABS Vetter Vindicator is still going strong after 30+ plus years.Granted, it has not been sprayed with gasoline for 75K miles and it is not made of PVC but I suspect it would still be functional if it were. There is more than oneGL out there that has successfully proven this for more than a few years that I am aware of. Quite possibly more.

:byebye:
The point of my post was where it actually states the recommended temp rating for schd 80 pvc, which is twice the wall thickness as schd 40, is only 140 degrees. And being the location of where on a wing it will be used should get to that temp or above. longevity would be my biggest concern from vibration. It was already posted that pvc tends to get brittle when exposed to sunlight, so by exposing it to heat as well would hasten its lifespan. I'm sure it would work for a while, but I would have more faith in the manifold if it was made from copper and sweated together. As far as the Vetter fairing, I'm sure the actual abs plastic has a coating of paint or resin like a fiberglas boat has. Where the pvc is just exposed to the air, sun, gas, ozone, and all the naysayers that say it won't work.,,
 

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westgl wrote:
PVC tubing,

I had to buy all types of materials and I needed to get familiar many types of products plastics are one area. What I know could fill a thimbleful, I don't claim to be an expert, or even some to look to for answers. Just someone who has spent a little time with it.

Well, I can see why you picked PVC, it has good chemical resistance, so your good there.

There are different types of PVC,

type I Good corrosion/chemical resistance lower impact vibration resistance used as an electrical Insulator, or fluid transfer pipe, water, air

type II same as type I but has a high impact resistance as well, higher tensile strength so you no longer have a material that can easily crack, due to vibration or temp as type-II is good for -50 to +140F deg.

CPVC is a high temp version of PVC operating temp +0F to + 200F used as chemical Processing & metal finishing, it is fairly tough a higher hardness than Type-I

My experience using the type 1 PVC tubing, putting in water pipes, The cement makes an air tight seal melting the two pieces into one.

I used type-1 pipe to run air lines in my shop and I run 130-PSI compressed air to run air tools all the time.

Westgl




Do not use PVC piping for air lines. They will burst eventually. And when they do, it's like a bomb going off. Hopefully it happens at night when no one is in the shop.



Check on the garagejournal.com forums. Lots of discussion on the subject.



They may work for you a long time..but I would not risk it after looking into the topic. Black iron is about the best choice. Copper isfine as well.
 

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Not an argument from me BC, just a factual debate...

Schedule 40/80 PVC are both Type-1Classes of PVC.
Type-1 service ratings are not generic, but are specific for the polymers used.
Type-1 PVC (allplumbing PVC available) is defined with ASTM standards and UL listed for itsintended service. Everyone, everywhereuses the same composition because of this for PVC sold in this Country. Other Countries may have different, additional or supplemental standards, but all rely on the ASTM standards for comparison. Additionally, there are ANSI and NSF ratings, but I'm trying to keep it short.

ASTM Type-1 PVCstandardizes schedule 40/80 PVC with:
a melting point of 360°F
a continuous service ambient air temperature rating of *160°[email protected] 264psi (*temperature rating goes up with less pressure)
a deflection temperature of *154°[email protected] 264psi
a Rockwell hardness of 112

Chlorinated PVC (CPVC) has different properties (as noted by Kit above) with:
a melting point of 395°F
a continuous service ambient air temperature rating of *200°F @ 264psi
a deflection temperature of *224°F @ 264psi
a Rockwell hardness of 117

AllSchedule 40/80can be had in Type-2 ratings which would increase its thermal properties, rigidity and strength.

Those are just base figures for base calculations for a given design using base products.As I've said, PVC comes in many different formulas. Those that work with it know. Corzan®, for example, is a high grade proprietary PVC mix. It comes in standard plumbing fittings configurations and its ratings are significantly higher than either Type 1/2. A continuous service ambient air temp rating of280°F is base for that product for example.

Don't misunderstand the pricing of high-end PVC compositions.
The suggested retail price of a Corzan® 2" elbow is over $100... A manifold of any kind made from the stuff would be exoticby anyones standard.
Other mixes have even higher ratings and costs. High temps and plastics don't come cheap.

As I've noted; manifolds from Type-1 schedule40 PVC plumbing fittings are certainly in use and have been for some time.The 140° rating is a code-derived safety rating and should benoted, yes. I've tested using it, and it held-up. I had to test it 'cause others are using it. I had to know for myself.
I am using schedule 80 CPVC for my duals though. It is not that much more expensive. The availability of CPVC is the same as PVC and I've gravitated towards that. That is the process of experimentation and my anal, common sense conclusion since the threads start. For a few bucks more, you get more temperature. I applaud some fellas for having run PVC for years with no ill results. It makes my choices easier. No area of contact on my bike sees the plastic exceeding the temperature limits of Type-1 PVC thermal ratings. I realize you are suspicious, but it is true. Other Forums have members that have proven results and we here shall have the same.

For the curious, a couple of these CPVC set-ups (minus a few+ visual pieces and lots of shaping) and your dual-carb set-up is a day away for about $130. A single-carbset-up is about half the cost plus a hair. Going the Clear route would be slightly more expensive and it would take an artistic hand to look perfect... Schedule 40 is ridiculously inexpensive. Coating (or painting) the end result is additional in recommendation, cost and labor and could be made to give it a unique look. But hey, its plastic... Make it known as such. The real-deal pics on my bike will have to wait for another day.
 

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Sorry Tom2, you posted while I was writing mine up... Not meaning to step over your post. :byebye:
 
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