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As most of you know I've only been riding about 5 months now and most of that time repairing what I ride. So, when and how do you use the front and rear brakes. Is there a "rule-of-thumb" guide as to when to apply the front brakes only, rear brakes only, or the combination of both:?? I find myself using the front brake a lot because its easy. I don't have to move my foot.
 

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I use both brakes all the time. The situation will determine how of which brake I use. If I need to stop in a hurray I will use more rear brake thann the front. Don't want the front wheel locking up.

Just recomendation, if you haven't already done it registar for a Motorcycle safety course in your area. These are great classes for everyone, new and seasoned rider alike. The teach you slow speed skills that are very useful.
 

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teacher wrote:
As most of you know I've only been riding about 5 months now and most of that time repairing what I ride. So, when and how do you use the front and rear brakes. Is there a "rule-of-thumb" guide as to when to apply the front brakes only, rear brakes only, or the combination of both:?? I find myself using the front brake a lot because its easy. I don't have to move my foot.
Hi Teacher. First, I also highly recommend seeking out and taking at least one motorcycle safety course. You will not regret it. I have a lot of miles on bikes, but have not ridden a lot in the last 19 years, so I'm taking another course in the spring to hone my skills.

Second, you will find this in training manuals, including the one from your state's department of licensing. You need to use both brakes most of the time. The front brake provides approximately 3/4 of your braking power, but it is not safe to use it by itself most of the time. If you need to stop fast, it is imperative that you use both brakes together. You can read the braking section in the Texas Motorcycle license manual on page 11 online. Here's the link. Texas MC manual

The more practice you get doing this, the more prepared you will be in an emergency. If it is already habit for you to use both brakes together, then you will do it in an emergency too.

Happy riding,
John
 

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Both Brakes when you want to slow down. no brakes when you want to speed up. Sorry i couldn't resist ;). John is right a safty corse is well worth the money. Even after riding for years i still learned alot and unlearned a few bad habits I had been carrying for years.
 

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To paraphrase what the guys are saying, "they didn't put the rear disk brake on for looks". Use both. You'll have better control, you'll have twice as much rubber on the road trying to stop you. Your brake pads and tires will last longer. If you're on slippery ground use the rear brake gently, it's not nice to lock up the front wheel, causes adrenalin OD.
 

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When riding the moutains, on occassion where you are required to do a lot of braking, it is best to use your front and assist with your rear. You have more breaking power with your front and also have dual disks which will remain cooler than the single rear. I've had occassion when taking the ride into the Black Canyon of the Gunnerson in Colorado where I lost my rear brake just as I got to the bottom. This was a 16% grade where my top speed was about 15 mph.
 

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I read that Texas drivers manual from cover to cover (so to speak). Thanks for the link, good reading.:cool:
 

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These guys are right, most of time use both breaks almost equally!

Exept in "Gravel" then try not to use your front break!

And if you have to "LOCK" your back break up at high speed and you are the least bit "side ways or leaning don't let off the brake, stay with it or it will "HighSide" you , it will "slingshot" you in the air and maybe into traffic!

Down shift through your gears so you don't have to use much Brake at all!:clapper:
 

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Teacher, I just want to bring interlocking brakes into the discussion, even though your bike will not have them. I suppose it is stated somewhere but I don't offhand know how the interlocking ratio back to front, is set up.

I always try to use the foot brake so as to get the interlocking action, and bring in the hand brake at the same time IF I deem it necessary. I will also use only the hand brake to TWEAK my speed if I am running straight. I always use the foot brake if braking is required in a turn. This method seems to wear everything equally, and seems safe.

I got this all from a 20 year Winger.
 

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I think if you look in the owner's manual Honda recommends using both brakes as does the Washington driver's manual but I suppose it's another one of those different strokes kind of things.
 

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There are "video's" for sale , like "Ride like a Pro" and are well worth the money!

Some bike mags advertise them?!

If you learn 1 thing from them that saves you from an accident , it's worth it!
 

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 I think the ratio is 60% rear, 40% front in  the 80 to 90 wings.. but knowing that does not help in stopping .. one set of shoes may not be working well... one tire may be a little more worn........                                                                                                                                   In Proficient Motorcycling ,  David Hough recommends  a lot of the above items as mentioned by the other site members  , especially in corners....  and a lot of engine braking ,too........ but the key he mentions over ,and over is  to modulate both brakes during the extreme braking  manoeuver... gently at first, and then   increasing both front and rear up to the maximum  hand force you can exert... trying to make the machine sink slowly, on both wheels, not dive nose downward.  /forums/images/emoticons/big_grin.gif             You want to keep the (already tiny) contact patch  on BOTH tires to be about equal , even though the front has most of the raw braking power .. It takes a bit of practise... but you can stop in an amazingly short distance if you master it .     SilverDave /forums/images/emoticons/emoticonsxtra/cooldj.gif
 

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SilverDave: Thanks for stating the ratio. Your other comments apply to extreme braking in panic stops, and seems to be good info.

I think Teacher was referring to normal everyday brake useage where you are running down to the corner store for milk. 90 percent of the time, I use both brakes, but there are times that I may just tweak the hand brake to fine tune a closing speed if the engine and gears can't do it. Kinda hard to describe.
 

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Doesn't the GL1100 have a linked brake system? If so, the rear pedal operates one of the front calipers, and the rear caliper. This is the brake you should use predominantly. The 25/75 rule is only applicable for standard (non-linked brake systems). Since the pedal applies 2 calipers, it should be used as the predominent stopper. The front handle should just be used when that little extra stopping power is needed, or you just want to slow down a bit. (But never in corners! If you need to hit the brakes in a corner, you are too late.)

Again, this is only for linked braking systems. On standard braking systems, the front brake should be used the most.

On my wing, since I have linked brakes, I barely touch the front handle, except to hold me in place while hill-starting, when fine speed adjustments are needed, or in panic stop situations.

I actually did an experiment to see the reletive braking power of both systems, and this is what I found:

From 30 MPH, I was able to stop in about 20 feet with just the rear brake applied.(This was me basically standing on the pedal, andbunny-hopping the rear wheel) Dry, clean asphault.

From 30 MPH I was able to stop in about 40 feet with just the Front brakehandle pulled.

I was able to stop in about 15 feet with both brakes.
 

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I think the linked brakes started on the 1983 1100 Phil, my 1982 doesn't have them.

Have you tried eBay or Craig's listto sell that Cat 22? I sold my Hunter 22 and my Sanibel 18 on eBay and came out quite well.
 

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It's a little late in the season to ebay it, but I'll try in the spring.

That makes sense on the linked brake issue.

The first time I rode this wing there were a few things that scared the poo out of me.

The linked braking system was the first. Every other bike I had ridden used normal, discreet systems where the front brake was the main method for stopping. As I was coming to a column of cars, and decided that I needed to stop, I grabed hold of the front brake, and not a whole lot happened.

The other scary thing was that "OD" light. I wasn't expecting an orange light to come on while I was on the freeway, and I nearly left skidmarks. (Not on the road...)
 

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That OD light is there to warn you against Over Doing it due to Goldwing Rapture.
 

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Teacher, statistics say that about 90 percent of motorcycle fatalities involve riders who never took a motorcycle safety course. I'd really hate for you to become one of those statistics.

Take the course and you'll never regret it. You'll be a much more confident rider who knows how to handle the situations that come up every day on a motorcyle.
 

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I'm waiting on one to start. I'm on this like a bear on honey!:dude:
 
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