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Today I installed the microwave in the new house.
The instructions called for a measurement between the bottom of cabinet and the bracket of 17 inch and 21/64 ". I dont think my tape measure has 64th on it.
And really nothing in a house require such an exact measurement. I did 3/8" and it worked fine.
I think the idiocy came from someone converting 44 centimeters in inch. I dont have meter tape either
 

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Today I installed the microwave in the new house.
The instructions called for a measurement between the bottom of cabinet and the bracket of 17 inch and 21/64 ". I dont think my tape measure has 64th on it.
And really nothing in a house require such an exact measurement. I did 3/8" and it worked fine.
I think the idiocy came from someone converting 44 centimeters in inch. I dont have meter tape either
Probably right, that would be the closest fractional conversion. 1/64 would be hard to read on a tape measure anyway. Don't know why we haven't gone metric like the rest of the world.
 

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Don't know why we haven't gone metric like the rest of the world.
Coming from a metric system it was tough to adjust. Many time I used the expression"three eights+ a small line".
Now I dont care too much except when working on mechanical things. I hate when I dont know if the nuts are metric or not
I very much like the gallon at the pump, but it really sucks when you're cooking and work with ounces
PS. In the technical work we used mm no matter the size. Everything mechanical is in mm. Try to express that , here, in 16 th of an inch
 

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My 1985 AMC Jeep Cherokee is one confused truck. Half the bolts are SAE, the other half metric. And some of those are the "odd-wad" (11, 13, 15mm) sizes that typically aren't used on other vehicles! So I have to get out ALL the tools to work on this thing....
 

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My 1985 AMC Jeep Cherokee is one confused truck. Half the bolts are SAE, the other half metric. And some of those are the "odd-wad" (11, 13, 15mm) sizes that typically aren't used on other vehicles! So I have to get out ALL the tools to work on this thing....
AMC says it all. I had a 1981 AMC Jeep CJ7 that was a conglomeration of not only nuts and bolts but also everything under the hood. Some Ford some Chevy some AMC. Had to replace the clutch once and the auto parts store had 5 different replacements for it. All different. The worst vehicle I ever owned.
 

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Not only AMC, Chevy in the mid eighties had both SAE and Metric fasteners mixed in. Ford from the eighties on up has metric engine stuff and SEA body stuff with the occasional metric bolt thrown in just so you empty your tool box for every job. Dodge/Chrysler was pretty good up through the late 90's when I got out of fleet work, they were pretty much mostly SAE. I don't really care one way or the other but stay all one way OR the other on a vehicle! Metric bolts are pretty much always marked with the bolt rating number on the head of the bolt. That is an easy way to spot metrics quickly. SAE bolts just have rating lines or nothing at all.
 

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My 1985 AMC Jeep Cherokee is one confused truck. Half the bolts are SAE, the other half metric. And some of those are the "odd-wad" (11, 13, 15mm) sizes that typically aren't used on other vehicles! So I have to get out ALL the tools to work on this thing....
You can use 7/16 for 11mm, 1/2" for 13mm 9/16 for 14mm and several others but for 9, 15, 17, 18 & some others you have to have the metric wrench. What I don't get how it happened is almost all spark plugs are SAE wrench size but metric thread. And most tires are inch size rims but metric profile.
 

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You can use 7/16 for 11mm, 1/2" for 13mm 9/16 for 14mm and several others but for 9, 15, 17, 18 & some others you have to have the metric wrench. What I don't get how it happened is almost all spark plugs are SAE wrench size but metric thread. And most tires are inch size rims but metric profile.
9mm=5/16
17mm=11/16
19mm=3/4

These are not perfect matches but they will usually get you by. The 13 is a bit loose on a 1/2" and 14 can be hard to get on a new 9/16.
If you are getting into stuff bigger than that then you probably should have dedicated tools.
 

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You should be really happy the British did away with measurement systems like 'Whitworth'. Some sizes were closer to SAE, some were closer to ISO, some only fit the old Ford sizes like 19/32" It made working on your Norton a real cluster.

Forget about thread repairs, except maybe with a file.
 

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9mm=5/16
17mm=11/16
19mm=3/4

These are not perfect matches but they will usually get you by. The 13 is a bit loose on a 1/2" and 14 can be hard to get on a new 9/16.
If you are getting into stuff bigger than that then you probably should have dedicated tools.
8mm is the same as 5/16
11/16 doesn't fit very well on a 17mm
3/4 & 19mm are the same, I have a snap on socket with both numbers on it.
Anything 24mm and up there is an inch size that fits as well as the metric. All of my sockets over 24mm are inch size and I worked on metric cars all my working life. The inch sizes were cheaper than metric on the tool trucks.
 
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9mm=5/16
17mm=11/16
19mm=3/4



These are not perfect matches but they will usually get you by. The 13 is a bit loose on a 1/2" and 14 can be hard to get on a new 9/16.
If you are getting into stuff bigger than that then you probably should have dedicated tools.
8mm is the same as 5/16
11/16 doesn't fit very well on a 17mm
3/4 & 19mm are the same, I have a snap on socket with both numbers on it.
Anything 24mm and up there is an inch size that fits as well as the metric. All of my sockets over 24mm are inch size and I worked on metric cars all my working life. The inch sizes were cheaper than metric on the tool trucks.
I beg to differ, 18mm and 3/4 are very close, 3/4 is the larger. Its what I use if I misplace my 18mm and it a little bit loose
 

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I beg to differ, 18mm and 3/4 are very close, 3/4 is the larger. Its what I use if I misplace my 18mm and it a little bit loose
You can beg all you want but 3/4 & 19mm are almost identical. 3/4" is .750", 19mm is .760".
 

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I beg to differ, 18mm and 3/4 are very close, 3/4 is the larger. Its what I use if I misplace my 18mm and it a little bit loose
You can beg all you want but 3/4 & 19mm are almost identical. 3/4" is .750", 19mm is .760".
Ok, I will give you that, I know I've used 3/4 in place of 18mm, never tried it in place of 19mm, I did say it was a tad larger than the 18, but have used several times. I haven't used 19mm very often
 

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I beg to differ, 18mm and 3/4 are very close, 3/4 is the larger. Its what I use if I misplace my 18mm and it a little bit loose
You can beg all you want but 3/4 & 19mm are almost identical. 3/4" is .750", 19mm is .760".
Ok, I will give you that, I know I've used 3/4 in place of 18mm, never tried it in place of 19mm, I did say it was a tad larger than the 18, but have used several times. I haven't used 19mm very often
Made me curious, 18mm is actually. 708 inches,
19mm is .748 , almost exactly 3/4. I have to convert between the 2 daily at work, I run a press brake so the dimensions are critical on a lot of jobs. Never used that outside of work until tonight, lol
 

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I wish they would go back to °F, more accurate than °C.
F is a smaller unit so your thermostat would be more accurate. Except is not. The thermostats have a dwelling that help you select when to start and when to stop. Dont know if I said it right. Suppose you set the thermostat at 68 F for heat. You could adjust the dwell so it starts when temp is 3/10 billow setting and stops at 3/10 over the setting. or your heat pump, boiler etc would go nuts
 

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Made me curious, 18mm is actually. 708 inches,
19mm is .748 , almost exactly 3/4. I have to convert between the 2 daily at work, I run a press brake so the dimensions are critical on a lot of jobs. Never used that outside of work until tonight, lol
I just round off 1mm =.040, easier to calculate in my head.
 

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F is a smaller unit so your thermostat would be more accurate. Except is not. The thermostats have a dwelling that help you select when to start and when to stop. Dont know if I said it right. Suppose you set the thermostat at 68 F for heat. You could adjust the dwell so it starts when temp is 3/10 billow setting and stops at 3/10 over the setting. or your heat pump, boiler etc would go nuts
Hysteresis is the term you were looking for. You set your thermostat for 70 degrees. Furnace kicks on at 69 degrees, runs until 71 degrees and shuts off. Doesn't kick on again until 69 degrees. That would be a hysteresis of two degrees. (which would be a pretty sloppy thermostat) :ROFL:

I use the 3/4 inch / 19mm tools interchangeably all the time! And 9/16 / 14mm.
 

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Your talking operation of a system, I'm talking temperature measurement. °C has 100 divisions between freezing water and boiling water, °F has 180 division.
 
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