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Hi- I appreciate any feedback:



The Symptoms:



  • Engine starts, idles well. From a stop it is sluggish in friction zone and I have to rev the engine high in order to get into first gear.
While at lower speeds (25-35mph, or below 3K RPM) it is not responsive and sluggish on the throttle, I have to continue to roll on the thottle for it to speed up.



When downshifting or rolling off the throttle, it spitfires/ light backfire.



All is fine at highway speeds or above 3K RPM





The Data:

1978 Goldwing w/ 25Ksat idle for at least a year.



Timing, compression, Dyna - ingnition, plugs, wires have just been checked and are fine.



I've ran Gumout through two tanks of gas, the spitfiring isn't as bad but it still does.



I have OEM 4 carb unit- I am unsure if it was ever rebuilt.





Question:



Anything I should look at next?



I've been hearing alot about Seafoam- if you think this might help, where do I pour it on the GL 1000?





Thanks Brothers!



Blessings,
Moose
 

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First, welcome to the forum from another Michigan resident. Nice looking bike in your profile pic.

Regarding your symptoms, I was unsure on a couple of things. First, you say you need to "rev the engine high to get it into first gear". If shifting it into first gear is difficult it's likely not related to the engine being sluggish. If you're meaning you need to rev it up to have enough power when taking off, that makes sense and fits well with the other symptoms.

Your problems sound pretty common for a bike that has sat without being properly prepped. The carbs can be somewhat finicky and the passages are tiny and gum up easily when they are allowed to sit for a while.

I'm not familiar with Gumout but I'm a strong believer in Seafoam for these problems. I would pour a full can (16 ounces) into the fuel tank next time you fill up. Put a few miles on it to make sure it gets into the carbs, then let it sit for a couple days. This should allow the seafoam in the fuel to break down the varnish in the passages. After a couple of days, run through that tank and see if the problem is improving. I've had great results with one tank but I understand some folks have needed to run it in 3 or 4 tankfuls to really get things freed up. If this doesn't take care of the problem, you may need to remove/rebuild the carbs but there's lots of info and help here to help you do it right the first time.

One last thing, you mentioned the ignition but didn't say if you have removed and read the plugs. If they're working correctly, they electrodes should be clean and the center insulator should be a light tan color. If not, you might throw a set of plugs in along with the seafoam treatment..

Best wishes and let us know how things are progressing.

Steve

On edit, check your fuel filter now, and after using the seafoam. That stuff has a way of cleaning out everything in the tank and petcock as well.
 

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Steve thanks for the info and the welcome.
The plugs that I just changed looked healthy for their age and had all the signs you described. I'll try the Seafoam in the tank as I'm headed up north on the bike this Friday. According to the bottle I'm also supposed to put some in the intake and some in the crankcase?

Where in MI are you located.
 

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I'm about 10 minutes south of Grand Rapids.

Regarding the seafoam in the crankcase, I throw it in most of my vehicles about 500 miles before I do an oil change just to help clean out any sludge from the oil passages, lifter valleys, etc. I doubt putting any in the crankcase would have an impact on your sluggishness.

Steve
 

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Welcome to the forum.

+1 for Seafoam in the gas tank. I'm assuming that you changed the oil as well. I would also try putting some in the oil and then running a little while and changing the oil. You never know how much sludge is in that oil pan, not that it would have too much to do with the sluggishness. I have been putting a tiny bit of TC-W3 2-cycle oil in my gas (around an ounce per 5 gallons) and that has helped my 1800 run a little better. The TC-W3 has cleaning agents in it as well as lubricating properties but I would wait to do that until you get the bike running closer to what you want it to be. It does sound like the carbs are a little gummed up though so be prepared for a rebuild. Another echo, as stated by SCB, checking the fuel filter is a must.
 

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Thanks PC Fix and DJCMK. Yes oil was recently changed but not with any cleaning agents in the crankcase. I'll try that.
 

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Just as a side note, a lot of times when a carb'ed rig is sluggish it is due to a rich condition. As engine speed increases you ingest more air and it starts to run better. You might inspect to insure the choke is coming all the way off, that the carbs are not floated too high, that kind of thing.
 

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Try shifting arround 3000 rpm and it will not be so sluggish. And it will accelerate slow if you are at 2000 rpm and at low speed. Keep the rpm's up.
 

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Well Moose, any improvement?
 

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if ALL the tune up stuff is right and the fuel filter is fresh, it is CARB rebuild time.
 
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